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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 38, Iss. 7 — Mar. 1, 1999
  • pp: 1163–1168

Design approaches with a lenslet array and a single, high-numerical-aperture annular-field objective lens for optical data storage systems that incorporate large numbers of parallel read–write–erase channels

José M. Sasián and Masud Mansuripur  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 38, Issue 7, pp. 1163-1168 (1999)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.38.001163


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Abstract

To achieve very high data rates (>109 bits/s) in optical data storage systems it is necessary to employ a large number of laser beams for parallel read–write–erase operations. Bringing all these beams to diffraction-limited focus with a high-numerical-aperture objective lens (while maintaining focus and tracking) requires techniques that are fundamentally different from those that are currently practiced in the field of optical data storage. We present two possible solutions to the problem of designing an objective lens for such systems, one involving an array of high-quality lenslets and the other based on a single, high-numerical-aperture annular-field-of-view conventional lens. Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages, on which we elaborate in the course of our discussions.

© 1999 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(080.3630) Geometric optics : Lenses
(210.0210) Optical data storage : Optical data storage
(210.3810) Optical data storage : Magneto-optic systems

History
Original Manuscript: September 23, 1998
Revised Manuscript: November 19, 1998
Published: March 1, 1999

Citation
José M. Sasián and Masud Mansuripur, "Design approaches with a lenslet array and a single, high-numerical-aperture annular-field objective lens for optical data storage systems that incorporate large numbers of parallel read–write–erase channels," Appl. Opt. 38, 1163-1168 (1999)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-38-7-1163


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References

  1. M. Mansuripur, The Physical Principles of Magneto-optical Recording (Cambridge U. Press, Cambridge, UK, 1995). [CrossRef]
  2. M. A. Fitch, “Molded optics: mating precision and mass production,” Photon. Spectra 25, 83–87 (1991).
  3. Examples of these emerging technologies include vertical cavity laser diode arrays, large arrays of miniature spatial light modulators, integrated optical waveguide–modulator–detector arrays, smart-pixel detector arrays, micromechanical actuators, and miniature beam scanners.
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  5. Each focused spot covers an area roughly equal to p2. Covering N tracks would require an area of Np2, which is approximately 1/N of the area of the circle.
  6. A. Offner, “New concepts in projection mask aligners,” Opt. Eng. 14, 130–132 (1975). [CrossRef]
  7. J. Braat, “Quality of microlithographic projection lenses,” in Optical Microlithography for Integrated Circuit Fabrication and Inspection, H. L. Stover, S. Wittekoek, eds., Proc. SPIE811, 22–30 (1987). [CrossRef]

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