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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 39, Iss. 24 — Aug. 20, 2000
  • pp: 4418–4424

Diode-Pumped 214.8-nm Nd:YAG /Cr 4 +:YAG Microchip Laser System for the Detection of NO

J. Wormhoudt, J. H. Shorter, C. C. Cook, and J. J. Zayhowski  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 39, Issue 24, pp. 4418-4424 (2000)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.39.004418


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Abstract

A passively Q-switched 214.8-nm Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG microchip laser system for the detection of NO was designed, constructed, and tested. The system uses the fifth harmonic of the 1.074-μm transition in Nd:YAG to detect NO by laser-induced fluorescence. A significant challenge was the development of an environmentally stable coating to provide the necessary discrimination between the 1.074-μm laser line and the stronger transition at 1.064 μm. The exact position of the fifth-harmonic frequency was determined by use of NO fluorescence excitation spectra to be 46556 ∓ 1.5 cm−1. With a pulse energy of approximately 50 nJ of fifth-harmonic light, we observed a detection sensitivity for NO of approximately 15 parts per billion by volume in a simple, compact optical system.

© 2000 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(140.3530) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, neodymium
(140.3580) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, solid-state
(190.4160) Nonlinear optics : Multiharmonic generation
(300.2530) Spectroscopy : Fluorescence, laser-induced
(300.6360) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, laser
(300.6540) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, ultraviolet

Citation
J. Wormhoudt, J. H. Shorter, C. C. Cook, and J. J. Zayhowski, "Diode-Pumped 214.8-nm Nd:YAG /Cr 4 +:YAG Microchip Laser System for the Detection of NO," Appl. Opt. 39, 4418-4424 (2000)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-39-24-4418


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  32. In response to a reviewer’s question, we undertook a preliminary investigation into the possibility that the shorter wavelength of the 214.8-nm laser might lead to greater interferences than, for example, the commonly used 225-nm laser line. We found that the major components of vehicle exhausts are saturated hydrocarbons that do not absorb either wavelength. The principal aromatic components such as benzene and toluene turn out to have similar absorption cross sections at 214.8 and 225 nm, with an expected large increase in cross section only coming at still shorter wavelengths. We estimate the absorption at 214.8 nm by these species in a typical automobile exhaust over a path suitable for laser-induced fluorescence to be in the range of one to two tenths of a percent. The point must be kept in mind, however, that high spectral resolution may not guarantee selectivity in a spectral region where some absorption bands do not have line structure.

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