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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 11, Iss. 1 — Jan. 1, 1972
  • pp: 22–25

Microphotography and the Kodak Research Laboratories

J. H. Altman  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 11, Issue 1, pp. 22-25 (1972)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.11.000022


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Abstract

Microphotography is defined as the production of photographs in which the image of the original object has been reduced to extremely small size, but its details are still reproduced with a high degree of clarity. The contributions of the Kodak Research Laboratories to this technology, which is now of considerable commercial importance, have been in the production of sensitized materials having suitable resolution and sensitometric characteristics These include both silver halide materials photoresists. Some of the history and characteristics of various products and processes are sketched briefly.

© 1972 Optical Society of America

History
Original Manuscript: July 26, 1971
Published: January 1, 1972

Citation
J. H. Altman, "Microphotography and the Kodak Research Laboratories," Appl. Opt. 11, 22-25 (1972)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-11-1-22


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References

  1. G. W. W. Stevens, Photogr. J. 90B, 149 (1950). See also A.F.C. Pollard, Brit. Soc. Int. Bibl. 5, 43 (1943).
  2. S. Bradbury, The Evolution of the Microscope (Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1967), Chap. 6.
  3. G. Shadbolt, Photogr. J. 4, 79 (1857).
  4. See, for example, the program of the topical meeting on The Uses of Optics in Microelectronics, sponsored by the Optical Society of America at Las Vegas, Nev., 25–27 Jan. 1971.
  5. E. Goldberg, Brit. J. Photogr. 73, 462 (1926).
  6. H. R. Verry, Microcopying Methods, revised by G. H. Wright (Focal Press, London and New York, 1967), p. 19.
  7. H. J. Fromm, S. C. Insalaco, Natl. Micro-News, No. 83, 3 (1966).
  8. G. Lippmann, Bull. Soc. Franc. Phot. 7 (Series II), 74 (1891).
  9. R. W. Wood, Physical Optics (Macmillan, 1934, reprinted by Dover, New York, 1967), 3rd ed., p. 215.
  10. M. Hepher, J. Photogr. Sci. 12, 181 (1964).
  11. L. M. Minsk, J. G. Smith, W. P. Van Deusen, J. F. Wright, J. Appl. Polymer Sci. 2, 302 (1959). [CrossRef]
  12. E. M. Robertson, W. P. Van Deusen, L. M. Minsk, J. Appl. Polymer Sci. 2, 308 (1959). [CrossRef]
  13. “Where the Action Is in Electronics,” special report, Business Week, Oct.4, 86 (1964).
  14. G. W. W. Stevens, Microphotography (Wiley, New York, 1968).
  15. J. H. Altman, H. C. Schmitt, in Proceedings of the 1968 Kodak Microminiaturization Seminar (Kodak publ. P-192-B), p. 12.
  16. D. F. Ilten, K. V. Patel, Image Technol. 13, 9 (Feb./March 1971).

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