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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 23, Iss. 1 — Jan. 1, 1984
  • pp: 134–138

Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. 1: A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation

Emmett W. Chappelle, Frank M. Wood, Jr., James E. McMurtrey, III, and W. Wayne Newcomb  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 23, Issue 1, pp. 134-138 (1984)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.23.000134


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Abstract

The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of green plants was evaluated as a means of remotely detecting plant stress and determining plant type. Corn and soybeans were used as representatives of monocots and dicots, respectively, in these studies. The fluorescence spectra of several plant pigments was excited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. Intact leaves from corn and soybeans also fluoresced using the nitrogen laser. The two plant species exhibited fluorescence spectra which had three maxima in common at 440, 690, and 740 nm. However, the relative intensities of these maxima were distinctly different for the two species. Soybeans had an additional slight maxima at 525 nm. Potassium deficiency in corn caused an increase in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. Simulated water stress in soybeans resulted in increased fluorescence at 440, 525, 690, and 740 nm. The inhibition of photosynthesis in soybeans by 3-(3-4-dichlorophenyl)-1-1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) gave increased fluorescence primarily at 690 and 740 nm. Chlorosis as occurring in senescent soybean leaves caused a decrease in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of plants offer the potential for remotely detecting certain types of stress condition and also for differentiating plant species.

© 1984 Optical Society of America

History
Original Manuscript: September 20, 1983
Published: January 1, 1984

Citation
Emmett W. Chappelle, Frank M. Wood, James E. McMurtrey, and W. Wayne Newcomb, "Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. 1: A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation," Appl. Opt. 23, 134-138 (1984)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-23-1-134

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