OSA's Digital Library

Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 33, Iss. 21 — Jul. 20, 1994
  • pp: 4539–4547

The sylvanshine: retroreflection from dew-covered trees

Alistair B. Fraser  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 33, Issue 21, pp. 4539-4547 (1994)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.33.004539


View Full Text Article

Enhanced HTML    Acrobat PDF (1259 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

Some dew-covered plants are strongly retroreflective. The bright glow seen when the antisolar point falls on grass is known as the heiligenschein. Its widely accepted explanation requires that the grass be covered with hair. The discovery of the sylvanshine, a closely related phenomenon best seen at night, revealed that strong retroreflection can occur on hairless dew-covered plants. A simple model shows that below a contact angle of 90°, the enhancement in the backscatter direction is virtually identical to that given by a diffusely reflecting surface, but as the contact angle climbs to 140°, enhancement increases by 2 orders of magnitude. Plants that exhibit such large contact angles are not the norm, but can be found chiefly among coniferous trees, a few of which display the sylvanshine with great brilliance.

© 1994 Optical Society of America

History
Original Manuscript: September 27, 1993
Revised Manuscript: January 24, 1994
Published: July 20, 1994

Citation
Alistair B. Fraser, "The sylvanshine: retroreflection from dew-covered trees," Appl. Opt. 33, 4539-4547 (1994)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-33-21-4539

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

If you are accessing the full text through a member bundle, please use the Enhanced HTML link to gain access to the citation lists and other restricted features. Note that accessing both the PDF and HTML versions of an article will count as only one download against your account.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

If you are accessing the full text through a member bundle, please use the Enhanced HTML link to gain access to the citation lists and other restricted features. Note that accessing both the PDF and HTML versions of an article will count as only one download against your account.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

If you wish to use one of your free member downloads to view the figures, click "Enhanced HTML" above and access the figures from the article itself or from the navigation tab.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

If you are accessing the full text through a member bundle, please use the Enhanced HTML link to gain access to the citation lists and other restricted features. Note that accessing both the PDF and HTML versions of an article will count as only one download against your account.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited