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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 35, Iss. 36 — Dec. 20, 1996
  • pp: 7075–7084

Four-laser airborne infrared spectrometer for atmospheric trace gas measurements

J. Roths, T. Zenker, U. Parchatka, F. G. Wienhold, and G. W. Harris  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 35, Issue 36, pp. 7075-7084 (1996)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.35.007075


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Abstract

We describe the four-laser airborne infrared (FLAIR) instrument, a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer designed for simultaneous high-sensitivity in situ measurements of four atmospheric trace gases in the troposphere. The FLAIR spectrometer was employed during the large-scale airborne research campaign on tropospheric ozone (TROPOZ II) in 1991 and was used to measure CO, H2O2, HCHO, and NO2 in the free troposphere where detection limits below 100 parts in 1012 by volume were achieved.

© 1996 Optical Society of America

History
Original Manuscript: February 5, 1996
Revised Manuscript: June 3, 1996
Published: December 20, 1996

Citation
J. Roths, T. Zenker, U. Parchatka, F. G. Wienhold, and G. W. Harris, "Four-laser airborne infrared spectrometer for atmospheric trace gas measurements," Appl. Opt. 35, 7075-7084 (1996)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-35-36-7075


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