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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 37, Iss. 31 — Nov. 1, 1998
  • pp: 7419–7428

Comparison of Two- and Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Methods in Optical Tomography

Martin Schweiger and Simon R. Arridge  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 37, Issue 31, pp. 7419-7428 (1998)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.37.007419


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Abstract

We present a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction scheme for optical near-infrared imaging of highly scattering material. The algorithm reconstructs the spatial distribution of the optical parameters of a volume Ω from transillumination measurements on the boundary of Ω. We test the performance of the method for a cylindrical object with embedded absorbing perturbation for a number of different source and detector arrangements. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of a mismatched reconstruction, using a two-dimensional (2D) reconstruction model to image a single plane of the object from 3D tomographic data obtained in a single plane. The motivation for the application of 2D models is their advantage in speed and memory requirements. We found that the difference in the measurement data between 2D and 3D models depends greatly on the measurement type used, giving a much better agreement for mean time-of-flight data than for dc intensity data. Image artifacts that are due to data model mismatches can therefore be significantly reduced by use of mean time data.

© 1998 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(110.3080) Imaging systems : Infrared imaging
(170.3010) Medical optics and biotechnology : Image reconstruction techniques
(170.3880) Medical optics and biotechnology : Medical and biological imaging
(170.6920) Medical optics and biotechnology : Time-resolved imaging

Citation
Martin Schweiger and Simon R. Arridge, "Comparison of Two- and Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Methods in Optical Tomography," Appl. Opt. 37, 7419-7428 (1998)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-37-31-7419


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