OSA's Digital Library

Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 38, Iss. 5 — Feb. 10, 1999
  • pp: 757–765

Motion-distorted composite-frame restoration

Adrian Stern and Norman S. Kopeika  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 38, Issue 5, pp. 757-765 (1999)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.38.000757


View Full Text Article

Enhanced HTML    Acrobat PDF (2608 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

Many imaging systems produce pictures by the superimposition of two fields of frames of interlaced sequences. Pictures obtained in this way, which are termed composite frames, are severely degraded if relative motion between the camera and the scene occurs. In the presence of motion the composite frame is affected by two types of distortion: the edge staircase effect that is due to the fact that objects appear at different positions in successive fields and motion blur that is due to scene motion during each field exposure. Motion-deinterlacing methods previously proposed to recover the staircase effect neglect motion blur. However, motion blur may be significant, especially in systems designed for low-intensity radiometric imaging that use long exposures or even in short-exposure systems that happen to be in moving vehicles such as tanks, planes, ships, etc. We introduce an algorithm for the restoration of the two types of distortion in a composite frame degraded by linear uniform motion.

© 1999 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(100.2000) Image processing : Digital image processing
(100.3020) Image processing : Image reconstruction-restoration

History
Original Manuscript: May 15, 1998
Revised Manuscript: September 22, 1998
Published: February 10, 1999

Citation
Adrian Stern and Norman S. Kopeika, "Motion-distorted composite-frame restoration," Appl. Opt. 38, 757-765 (1999)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-38-5-757


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. W. K. Pratt, Digital Image Processing (Wiley, New York, 1978).
  2. N. S. Kopeika, A System Engineering Approach to Imaging, (SPIE Optical Engineering, Bellingham, Wash., 1998), Chap. 14, pp. 411–440.
  3. B. Girod, “Motion compensation: visual aspects, accuracy, and fundamental limits,” in Motion Analysis and Image Sequence Processing, M. I. Sezan, R. L. Lagendijk, eds. (Kluwer, Boston, 1993), Chap. 5, pp. 135–139.
  4. R. A. F. Belfor, R. L. Lagendijk, J. Biemond, “Subsampling of digital image sequences using motion information,” in Motion Analysis and Image Sequence Processing, M. I. Sezan, R. L. Lagendijk, eds. (Kluwer, Boston, 1993), Chap. 9. [CrossRef]
  5. V. Markandey, T. Clatanoff, R. Gove, K. Ohara, “Motion adaptive deinterlacer for DMD (digital micromirror device) based digital television,” IEEE Trans. Consumer Electron. 40, 735–741 (1994). [CrossRef]
  6. R. Manduchi, G. M. Cortelazzo, “Spectral characteristics and motion-compensated restoration of composite frames,” IEEE Trans. Image Process. 4, 95–99 (1995). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. L. Levi, Applied Optics (Wiley, New York, 1980), Vol. 2, Chap. 18, pp. 722–728.
  8. N. S. Kopeika, A System Engineering Approach to Imaging (SPIE Optical Engineering, Bellingham, Wash., 1998), Chap. 18, pp. 517–524.
  9. M. Sonka, V. Hlavac, R. Boyle, Image Processing, Analysis and Machine Vision (Chapman & Hall, London, 1993), Chaps. 7 and 14. [CrossRef]
  10. O. Hadar, I. Dror, N. S. Kopeika, “Image resolution limits resulting from mechanical vibration. Part IV: real time numerical calculation of optical transfer functions and experimental verification,” Opt. Eng. 33, 566–578 (1994). [CrossRef]
  11. T. Reuter, “Standards conversion using motion compensation,” Signal Process. 16, 73–82 (1989). [CrossRef]
  12. S. Tubaro, F. Rocca, “Motion field estimators and their application to image interpolation,” in Motion Analysis and Image Sequence Processing, M. I. Sezan, R. L. Lagendijk, eds. (Kluwer, Boston, 1993), Chap. 6, pp. 160–165.
  13. E. Dubois, “The sampling and reconstruction of time-varying imagery with application in video systems,” Proc. IEEE 73, 502–522 (1985). [CrossRef]
  14. A. Stern, N. S. Kopeika, “Analytical method to calculate optical transfer function for image motion and vibration using moments and its implementation in image restoration,” in Digital Image Recovery and Synthesis III, P. S. Idell, T. J. Schultz, eds., Proc. SPIE2827, 191–202 (1996). [CrossRef]
  15. O. Hadar, Z. Adar, A. Cotter, N. S. Kopeika, “Restoration of images degraded by extreme mechanical vibrations,” Opt. Laser Technol. 29, 171–177 (1997). [CrossRef]
  16. A. Stern, N. S. Kopeika, “Analytical method to calculate optical transfer function for image motion and vibration using moments,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14, 388–396 (1997). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited