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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 38, Iss. 9 — Mar. 20, 1999
  • pp: 1459–1466

Laser-induced breakdown spectrometry as a multimetal continuous-emission monitor

Hansheng Zhang, Fang-Yu Yueh, and Jagdish P. Singh  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 38, Issue 9, pp. 1459-1466 (1999)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.38.001459


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Abstract

Laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) has been used to detect atomic and molecular species in various environments. LIBS has the capability to be used as a continuous-emission monitor to monitor toxic-metal concentrations in stack emissions. Recently a mobile LIBS system was calibrated in our laboratory and tested as a multimetal continuous-emission monitor during a joint U.S. Department of Energy–Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) test. LIBS measurements were performed with three sets of metal concentrations at the EPA Rotary Kiln Incinerator Simulator. The LIBS system successfully measured concentrations of Cr, Pb, Cd, and Be in near real time in this test. Real-time LIBS data were averaged and compared with data obtained from an EPA reference method that was conducted concurrently with LIBS. The details of the LIBS calibration and results of these LIBS measurements are described.

© 1999 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(120.0120) Instrumentation, measurement, and metrology : Instrumentation, measurement, and metrology
(140.3440) Lasers and laser optics : Laser-induced breakdown
(280.1120) Remote sensing and sensors : Air pollution monitoring
(300.2140) Spectroscopy : Emission
(300.6210) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, atomic
(300.6500) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, time-resolved

History
Original Manuscript: June 12, 1998
Revised Manuscript: September 9, 1998
Published: March 20, 1999

Citation
Hansheng Zhang, Fang-Yu Yueh, and Jagdish P. Singh, "Laser-induced breakdown spectrometry as a multimetal continuous-emission monitor," Appl. Opt. 38, 1459-1466 (1999)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-38-9-1459


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