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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 39, Iss. 30 — Oct. 20, 2000
  • pp: 5403–5414

Numerical Simulation of the Effect of Refractive Turbulence on Coherent Lidar Return Statistics in the Atmosphere

Viktor A. Banakh, Igor N. Smalikho, and Christian Werner  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 39, Issue 30, pp. 5403-5414 (2000)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.39.005403


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Abstract

We propose an algorithm and the results of a numerical study of random realizations and statistics of a pulsed coherent lidar return that allow for refractive turbulence. We show that, under conditions of refractive turbulence, the relative variance of the lidar return power can exceed unity by a factor of as much as 1.5. Clear manifestations of the turbulent effect of backscattering amplification have been revealed from simulations of space-based lidar sensing of the atmosphere with coherent lidar. Under conditions of strong optical turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, as a result of the backscattering amplification effect, the mean lidar return power can exceed the return power in the absence of turbulence by a factor of 3.

© 2000 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(010.1300) Atmospheric and oceanic optics : Atmospheric propagation
(010.3640) Atmospheric and oceanic optics : Lidar
(030.6140) Coherence and statistical optics : Speckle
(290.5930) Scattering : Scintillation

Citation
Viktor A. Banakh, Igor N. Smalikho, and Christian Werner, "Numerical Simulation of the Effect of Refractive Turbulence on Coherent Lidar Return Statistics in the Atmosphere," Appl. Opt. 39, 5403-5414 (2000)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-39-30-5403


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References

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