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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 41, Iss. 9 — Mar. 20, 2002
  • pp: 1601–1603

Response to Comment on “Heterodyne Lidar Returns in the Turbulent Atmosphere: Performance Evaluation of Simulated Systems” by Frehlich and Kavaya

Aniceto Belmonte and Barry J. Rye  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 41, Issue 9, pp. 1601-1603 (2002)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.41.001601


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Abstract

The differences in approach and misunderstandings that account for the problems described in Frehlich and Kavaya’s comment [Appl. Opt. 41, 1595 (2002)] are summarized. We also acknowledge an omission in our paper that has been drawn to our attention separately.

© 2002 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(010.1330) Atmospheric and oceanic optics : Atmospheric turbulence
(010.3640) Atmospheric and oceanic optics : Lidar
(010.7060) Atmospheric and oceanic optics : Turbulence

Citation
Aniceto Belmonte and Barry J. Rye, "Response to Comment on “Heterodyne Lidar Returns in the Turbulent Atmosphere: Performance Evaluation of Simulated Systems” by Frehlich and Kavaya," Appl. Opt. 41, 1601-1603 (2002)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-41-9-1601


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References

  1. R. Frehlich and M. J. Kavaya, “Comment on ‘Heterodyne lidar returns in the turbulent atmosphere: performance evaluation of simulated systems’,” Appl. Opt. 41, 1595¿1600 (2002).
  2. B. J. Rye, “Refractive turbulence contribution to incoherent backscatter heterodyne lidar returns,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 71, 687¿691 (1981).
  3. S. F. Clifford and S. Wandzura, “Monostatic heterodyne lidar performance: the effect of the turbulent atmosphere,” Appl. Opt. 20, 514¿516 (1981).
  4. R. Murty, “Refractive turbulence effects on truncated Gaussian beam heterodyne lidar,” Appl. Opt. 23, 2498¿2502 (1984).
  5. A. Belmonte and B. J. Rye, “Heterodyne lidar returns in the turbulent atmosphere: performance evaluation of simulated systems,” Appl. Opt. 39, 2401¿2411 (2000).
  6. R. G. Frehlich and M. J. Kavaya, “Coherent laser radar performance for general atmospheric refractive turbulence,” Appl. Opt. 30, 5325¿5352 (1991).
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  8. V. A. Banakh, I. N. Smalikho, and C. Werner, “Effect of refractive turbulence on Doppler lidar operation in atmosphere: numerical simulation,” in Proceedings of the Tenth Biennial Coherent Laser Radar Conference, Mt. Hood, Oregon, 28 June¿2 July 1999 (Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, Ala., 1999), pp. 82¿85.
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  11. A. Belmonte, “Feasibility study for the simulation of beam propagation: consideration of coherent lidar performance,” Appl. Opt. 39, 5426¿5445 (2000).
  12. C. E. Coulman, J. Vernin, Y. Coqueugniot, and J. L. Caccia, “Outer scale of turbulence appropriate to modeling refractive-index structure profiles,” Appl. Opt. 27, 155¿160 (1988).
  13. L. C. Andrews, “An analytical model for the refractive-index power spectrum and its application to optical scintillation in the atmosphere,” J. Mod. Opt. 39, 1849¿1853 (1992).
  14. What is called backscatter enhancement in the Russian literature arises from redirection of incident and scattered light (the former leading to target-plane scintillation) and not from an increase in the backscattering cross section. In lidar terms, it is an acceptance angle or antenna area effect and is not related to the backscatter coefficient.
  15. Yu. A. Kravtsov and A. I. Saichev, “Properties of coherent waves reflected in a turbulent medium,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 2, 2100¿2105 (1985).
  16. Yu. N. Barabanenkov, Yu. A. Kravtsov, V. D. Ozrin, and A. I. Saichev, “Enhanced backscattering in optics,” in Progress in Optics, E. Wolf, ed. (Elsevier, New York, 1991), Vol. 29, pp. 67¿197.
  17. M. S. Belen’kii and V. L. Mironov, “Diffraction of optical radiation on a mirror disk in a turbulent atmosphere,” Kvant. Elektron. 5, 38¿45 (1972), cited in Ref. 16.
  18. A. G. Vinogradov, Yu. A. Kravtsov, and V. I. Tatarskii, “Enhanced backscattering from bodies immersed in a random homogeneous medium,” Izv. Vyssh. Uchebn. Zaved. Radiofiz 16, 1064¿1070 (1973), cited in Refs. 15 and 16.

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