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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 42, Iss. 30 — Oct. 20, 2003
  • pp: 6210–6220

On-line detection of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants in technical polymers with laser-induced breakdown spectrometry

Michael Stepputat and Reinhard Noll  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 42, Issue 30, pp. 6210-6220 (2003)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.42.006210


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Abstract

The use of laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) for the analysis of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants in end-of-life waste electric and electronic equipment (EOL-WEEE) pieces is investigated. Single- and double-pulse plasma excitation as well as the influence of detection parameters is studied to yield a parameter field with improved sensitivity and limits of detection. A LIBS analyzer was set up as an on-line measuring unit to detect heavy metals and brominated flame retardants in moving EOL-WEEE pieces in an automatic sorting line. An autofocusing unit with an adjustment range of 50 mm was incorporated to permit measurements of objects that pass by a LIBS analyzer with their surfaces at various distances from it. Tests with EOL-WEEE monitor housings on the conveyor belt of a pilot sorting system successfully demonstrated the capability of the LIBS analyzer to quantify the concentration of hazardous elements in real waste EOL-WEEE pieces.

© 2003 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(120.0280) Instrumentation, measurement, and metrology : Remote sensing and sensors
(140.3440) Lasers and laser optics : Laser-induced breakdown
(160.5470) Materials : Polymers
(300.6360) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, laser
(300.6500) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, time-resolved

History
Original Manuscript: January 20, 2003
Revised Manuscript: July 18, 2003
Published: October 20, 2003

Citation
Michael Stepputat and Reinhard Noll, "On-line detection of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants in technical polymers with laser-induced breakdown spectrometry," Appl. Opt. 42, 6210-6220 (2003)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-42-30-6210


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