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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 43, Iss. 29 — Oct. 10, 2004
  • pp: 5443–5451

Measurement of small-signal absorption coefficient and absorption cross section of collagen for 193-nm excimer laser light and the role of collagen in tissue ablation

Brian T. Fisher and David W. Hahn  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 43, Issue 29, pp. 5443-5451 (2004)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.43.005443


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Abstract

A 193-nm ArF excimer laser transmission was measured at subablative fluence through varying strength solutions of dissolved collagen, yielding an absorption cross section of 1.14 × 10-17 cm2 for the peptide bond, which accounts for 96% of the total collagen attenuation that is based on additional transmission measurements through solutions of isolated constituent amino acids. The measured absorption cross sections, in combination with typical corneal tissue composition, yield a predicted corneal tissue absorption coefficient of 16,000 cm-1. In addition, dry collagen films were prepared and ablation-rate data were recorded as a function of laser fluence. Ablation rates were modeled by use of a Beer-Lambert blow-off model, incorporating a measured ablation threshold and an absorption coefficient that are based on the measured collagen absorption cross section and the film bond density. The measured ablation rates and those predicted by the model were in very good agreement. The experiments suggest that collagen-based absorption coefficients are consistent with predicted corneal tissue ablation rates and previously observed dynamic changes in tissue properties under ablative conditions.

© 2004 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(170.0170) Medical optics and biotechnology : Medical optics and biotechnology
(170.1020) Medical optics and biotechnology : Ablation of tissue
(170.4470) Medical optics and biotechnology : Ophthalmology

History
Original Manuscript: February 18, 2004
Revised Manuscript: May 11, 2004
Published: October 10, 2004

Citation
Brian T. Fisher and David W. Hahn, "Measurement of small-signal absorption coefficient and absorption cross section of collagen for 193-nm excimer laser light and the role of collagen in tissue ablation," Appl. Opt. 43, 5443-5451 (2004)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-43-29-5443


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