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Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Vol. 44, Iss. 11 — Apr. 10, 2005
  • pp: 2162–2176

Adjustment of guidelines for exposure of the eye to optical radiation from ocular instruments: statement from a task group of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP)

David Sliney, Danielle Aron-Rosa, Francois DeLori, Franz Fankhauser, Robert Landry, Martin Mainster, John Marshall, Bernard Rassow, Bruce Stuck, Stephen Trokel, Teresa Motz West, and Michael Wolffe  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 44, Issue 11, pp. 2162-2176 (2005)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.44.002162


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Abstract

A variety of optical and electro-optical instruments are used for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications to the human eye. These generally expose ocular structures to either coherent or incoherent optical radiation (ultraviolet, visible, or infrared radiation) under unique conditions. We convert both laser and incoherent exposure guidelines derived for normal exposure conditions to the application of ophthalmic sources.

© 2005 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(170.4460) Medical optics and biotechnology : Ophthalmic optics and devices
(170.4470) Medical optics and biotechnology : Ophthalmology

History
Original Manuscript: December 9, 2004
Manuscript Accepted: December 12, 2004
Published: April 10, 2005

Citation
David Sliney, Danielle Aron-Rosa, Francois DeLori, Franz Fankhauser, Robert Landry, Martin Mainster, John Marshall, Bernard Rassow, Bruce Stuck, Stephen Trokel, Teresa Motz West, and Michael Wolffe, "Adjustment of guidelines for exposure of the eye to optical radiation from ocular instruments: statement from a task group of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP)," Appl. Opt. 44, 2162-2176 (2005)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-44-11-2162


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