OSA's Digital Library

Applied Optics

Applied Optics

APPLICATIONS-CENTERED RESEARCH IN OPTICS

  • Editor: Joseph N. Mait
  • Vol. 48, Iss. 10 — Apr. 1, 2009
  • pp: 1891–1897

Adaptive dynamic range matching for spectroscopic measurements

J. Kinast and M. E. Gehm  »View Author Affiliations


Applied Optics, Vol. 48, Issue 10, pp. 1891-1897 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/AO.48.001891


View Full Text Article

Enhanced HTML    Acrobat PDF (356 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We describe the design and development of an adaptive spectrometer that actively manages dynamic range mismatch between source signals and the spectrometer’s detector. The introduction of an inexpensive digital micromirror array yields performance improvements compared to a traditional device. Simulation results are presented that indicate real-world scenarios in which the adaptive spectrometer will yield superior performance. Experimental results from a first-generation prototype adaptive spectrometer confirm the expectations of the simulations.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(120.6200) Instrumentation, measurement, and metrology : Spectrometers and spectroscopic instrumentation
(300.6190) Spectroscopy : Spectrometers

ToC Category:
Spectroscopy

History
Original Manuscript: November 17, 2008
Revised Manuscript: March 2, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: March 6, 2009
Published: March 25, 2009

Citation
J. Kinast and M. E. Gehm, "Adaptive dynamic range matching for spectroscopic measurements," Appl. Opt. 48, 1891-1897 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/ao/abstract.cfm?URI=ao-48-10-1891


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. P. Burt and R. J. Kolczynski, “Enhanced image capture through fusion,” in Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Computer Vision (IEEE, 1993), pp. 173-182.
  2. B. C. Madden, “Extended intensity range imaging,” Tech. Rep. (GRASP Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania, 1993), pp. 1-19.
  3. C. Schlick, “Quantization techniques for visualization of high dynamic range pictures,” in 5th Eurographics Workshop on Rendering (Springer-Verlag, 1994), pp. 7-18.
  4. S. Mann and R. W. Picard, “Being 'undigital' with digital cameras: extending dynamic range by combining differently exposed pictures,” in Proceedings of the 46th Annual IS&T Conference (IEEE, 1995), pp. 442-448.
  5. P. E. Debevec and J. Malik, “Recovering high dynamic range radiance maps from photographs,” in Proceedings of the 24th Annual Conference on Computer Graphics and Interactive Techniques (ACM Press/Addison-Wesley, 1997), pp. 369-378.
  6. T. Mitsunaga and S. K. Nayar, “Radiometric self calibration,” in IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (IEEE, 1999), Vol. 1, pp. 374-380.
  7. M. A. Robertson, S. Borman, and R. L. Stevenson, “Dynamic range improvement through multiple exposures,” in Proceedings of the International Conference on Image Processing (IEEE, 1999), Vol. 3, pp. 159-163.
  8. S. Battiato, A. Castorina, and M. Mancuso, “High dynamic range imaging for digital still camera: an overview,” J. Electron. Imaging 12, 459-469 (2003). [CrossRef]
  9. J. Castracane and M. Gutin, “DMD-based bloom control for intensified imaging systems,” Proc. SPIE 3633, 234-242(1999). [CrossRef]
  10. M. P. Christensen, G. W. Euliss, M. J. McFadden, K. M. Coyle, P. Milojkovic, M. W. Haney, J. van der Gracht, and R. A. Athale, “ACTIVE-EYES: an adaptive pixel-by-pixel image-segmentation sensor architecture for high-dynamic-range hyperspectral imaging,” Appl. Opt. 41, 6093-6103 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. S. K. Nayar and V. Branzoi, “Adaptive dynamic range imaging: optical control of pixel exposures over space and time,” in Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Vision (IEEE, 2003), Vol. 2, pp. 1168-1175. [CrossRef]
  12. S. C. Wang and D. N. Ludington, “Readout circuit for optical sensing charge injection device facilitating an extended dynamic range,” U.S. patent 4,734,776 (29 March 1988).
  13. S. Mendis, S. Kemeny, R. Gee, B. Pain, Q. Kim, and E. Fossum, “Progress in CMOS active pixel image sensors,” Proc. SPIE 2172, 19-29 (1994). [CrossRef]
  14. Y. T. Tsai, “Method and apparatus for extending the dynamic range of an electronic imaging system,” U.S. patent 5,309,243 (3 May 1994).
  15. E. P. Rudd and T. A. Skunes, “Method and apparatus for exposure control in light-based measurement,” U.S. patent 5,519,204 (21 May 1996).
  16. V. M. Brajovic, R. Miyagawa, and T. Kanade, “Temporal photoreception for adaptive dynamic range image sensing and encoding,” Neural Networks 11, 1149-1158 (1998). [CrossRef]
  17. M. A. Tan and J. Luo, “Self-calibrating anti-blooming circuit for CMOS image sensor having a spillover protection performance in response to a spillover condition,” U.S. patent 7,381,936 (3 June 2008).

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.

Figures

Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3
 
Fig. 4
 

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited