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Applied Spectroscopy

Applied Spectroscopy

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  • Vol. 49, Iss. 9 — Sep. 1, 1995
  • pp: 14A–28A

Laser Ablation

Richard E. Russo

Applied Spectroscopy, Vol. 49, Issue 9, pp. 14A-28A (1995)


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Abstract

"Laser ablation" conjures up star-wars images of a high-powered laser beam obliterating anything in its path! In reality, this view is accurate. When a short-pulsed, high-peak-power laser beam is focused onto any solid target, a portion of the material instantaneously explodes into vapor. The drawing in Fig. 1 is a conceptual interpretation of laser ablation. Photographs in Figs. 2 and 3 show target results after laser ablation (with the use of multiple pulses and different laser-beam energies). Laser "craters" resemble those caused by meteorites striking a planet or volcanic eruptions.

Citation
Richard E. Russo, "Laser Ablation," Appl. Spectrosc. 49, 14A-28A (1995)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/as/abstract.cfm?URI=as-49-9-14A


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