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Biomedical Optics Express

Biomedical Optics Express

  • Editor: Joseph A. Izatt
  • Vol. 1, Iss. 4 — Nov. 1, 2010
  • pp: 1209–1216

Direct and instantaneous observation of intravenously injected substances using intravital confocal micro-videography

Yu Matsumoto, Takahiro Nomoto, Horacio Cabral, Yoko Matsumoto, Sumiyo Watanabe, R. James Christie, Kanjiro Miyata, Makoto Oba, Tadayoshi Ogura, Yuichi Yamasaki, Nobuhiro Nishiyama, Tatsuya Yamasoba, and Kazunori Kataoka  »View Author Affiliations


Biomedical Optics Express, Vol. 1, Issue 4, pp. 1209-1216 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/BOE.1.001209


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Abstract

We describe the development and application of intravital confocal micro-videography to visualize entrance, distribution, and clearance of drugs within various tissues and organs. We use a Nikon A1R confocal laser scanning microscope system attached to an upright ECLIPSE FN1. The Nikon A1R allows simultaneous four channel acquisition and speed of 30 frames per second while maintaining high resolution of 512 × 512 scanned points. The key techniques of our intravital imaging are (1) to present a flat and perpendicular surface to the objective lens, and (2) to expose the subject with little or no bleeding to facilitate optical access to multiple tissues and organs, and (3) to isolate the subject from the body movement without compressing the blood vessels, and (4) to insert a tail vein catheter for timed injection without moving the subject. Ear lobe dermis tissue was accessible without surgery. Liver, kidney, and subcutaneous tumor were accessed following exteriorization through skin incision. In order to image initial extravasations of compounds into tissue following intravenous injection, movie acquisition was initialized prior to drug administration. Our technique can serve as a powerful tool for investigating biological mechanisms and functions of intravenously injected drugs, with both spatial and temporal resolution.

© 2010 OSA

OCIS Codes
(170.1790) Medical optics and biotechnology : Confocal microscopy
(170.2655) Medical optics and biotechnology : Functional monitoring and imaging

ToC Category:
Microscopy

History
Original Manuscript: September 27, 2010
Revised Manuscript: October 16, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: October 17, 2010
Published: October 21, 2010

Citation
Yu Matsumoto, Takahiro Nomoto, Horacio Cabral, Yoko Matsumoto, Sumiyo Watanabe, R. James Christie, Kanjiro Miyata, Makoto Oba, Tadayoshi Ogura, Yuichi Yamasaki, Nobuhiro Nishiyama, Tatsuya Yamasoba, and Kazunori Kataoka, "Direct and instantaneous observation of intravenously injected substances using intravital confocal micro-videography," Biomed. Opt. Express 1, 1209-1216 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/boe/abstract.cfm?URI=boe-1-4-1209


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