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Biomedical Optics Express

Biomedical Optics Express

  • Editor: Joseph A. Izatt
  • Vol. 4, Iss. 10 — Oct. 1, 2013
  • pp: 2209–2223

Light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities based on hybrid simplified spherical harmonics with radiosity model

Defu Yang, Xueli Chen, Zhen Peng, Xiaorui Wang, Jorge Ripoll, Jing Wang, and Jimin Liang  »View Author Affiliations


Biomedical Optics Express, Vol. 4, Issue 10, pp. 2209-2223 (2013)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/BOE.4.002209


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Abstract

Modeling light propagation in the whole body is essential and necessary for optical imaging. However, non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption regions commonly exist in biological tissues, which lead to inaccuracy of the existing light transport models. In this paper, a novel hybrid light transport model that couples the simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPN) with the radiosity theory (HSRM) was presented, to accurately describe light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities. In the model, the radiosity theory was used to characterize the light transport in non-scattering regions and the SPN was employed to handle the scattering problems, including subsets of low-scattering and high absorption. A Neumann source constructed by the light transport in the non-scattering region and formed at the interface between the non-scattering and scattering regions was superposed into the original light source, to couple the SPN with the radiosity theory. The accuracy and effectiveness of the HSRM was first verified with both regular and digital mouse model based simulations and a physical phantom based experiment. The feasibility and applicability of the HSRM was then investigated by a broad range of optical properties. Lastly, the influence of depth of the light source on the model was also discussed. Primary results showed that the proposed model provided high performance for light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities.

© 2013 OSA

OCIS Codes
(170.3660) Medical optics and biotechnology : Light propagation in tissues
(170.7050) Medical optics and biotechnology : Turbid media
(170.6935) Medical optics and biotechnology : Tissue characterization

ToC Category:
Optics of Tissue and Turbid Media

History
Original Manuscript: July 18, 2013
Revised Manuscript: September 13, 2013
Manuscript Accepted: September 17, 2013
Published: September 23, 2013

Citation
Defu Yang, Xueli Chen, Zhen Peng, Xiaorui Wang, Jorge Ripoll, Jing Wang, and Jimin Liang, "Light transport in turbid media with non-scattering, low-scattering and high absorption heterogeneities based on hybrid simplified spherical harmonics with radiosity model," Biomed. Opt. Express 4, 2209-2223 (2013)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/boe/abstract.cfm?URI=boe-4-10-2209


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