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Biomedical Optics Express

Biomedical Optics Express

  • Editor: Joseph A. Izatt
  • Vol. 5, Iss. 7 — Jul. 1, 2014
  • pp: 2341–2348
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Controlled 3D rotation of biological cells using optical multiple-force clamps

Yoshio Tanaka and Shin-ich Wakida  »View Author Affiliations


Biomedical Optics Express, Vol. 5, Issue 7, pp. 2341-2348 (2014)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/BOE.5.002341


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Abstract

Controlled three-dimensional (3D) rotation of arbitrarily shaped objects in the observation space of optical microscopes is essential for realizing tomographic microscope imaging and offers great flexibility as a noncontact micromanipulation tool for biomedical applications. Herein, we present 3D rotational control of inhomogeneous biological samples using 3D optical multiple-force clamps based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus-tunable lens. For inhomogeneous samples with shape and optical anisotropy, we choose diatoms and their fragments, and demonstrate interactive and controlled 3D rotation about arbitrary axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates. We also outline the hardware setup and 3D rotation method for our demonstrations.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Precise optical controlled manipulation of non-spherical micro-objects, especially synthetic microstructures [1

1. D. Palima and J. Glückstad, “Gearing up for optical microrobotics: micromanipulation and actuation of synthetic microstructures by optical forces,” Laser Photonics Rev. 7(4), 478–494 (2013). [CrossRef]

] and biological samples such as diatoms [2

2. Y. Tanaka, H. Kawada, K. Hirano, M. Ishikawa, and H. Kitajima, “Automated manipulation of non-spherical micro-objects using optical tweezers combined with image processing techniques,” Opt. Express 16(19), 15115–15122 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 3

3. D. B. Phillips, S. H. Simpson, J. A. Grieve, G. M. Gibson, R. Bowman, M. J. Padgett, M. J. Miles, and D. M. Carberry, “Position clamping of optically trapped microscopic non-spherical probes,” Opt. Express 19(21), 20622–20627 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], is of widespread importance but is a challenging task. Such manipulations must occur in a three-dimensional (3D) microscopic working space, where their motion generally has six degrees-of-freedom (6DOF), that is, 3D translation and 3D rotation. In particular, since the 3D rotation of single cells can provide two-dimensional (2D) views of their subcellular structures from different directions [4

4. M. K. Kreysing, T. Kiessling, A. Fritsch, C. Dietrich, J. R. Guck, and J. A. Käs, “The optical cell rotator,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16984–16992 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7

7. F. Hörner, M. Woerdemann, S. Müller, B. Maier, and C. Denz, “Full 3D translational and rotational optical control of multiple rod-shaped bacteria,” J. Biophotonics 3(7), 468–475 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], the precise control techniques of 3D rotation can be used for the realization of computer tomographic (CT) microscope imaging [8

8. J. Swoger, P. Verveer, K. Greger, J. Huisken, and E. H. K. Stelzer, “Multi-view image fusion improves resolution in three-dimensional microscopy,” Opt. Express 15(13), 8029–8042 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

However, until now, the precise rotation of microscopic samples for 3D tomographic imaging has required an intricate setup of electric motors [9

9. P. J. Shaw, D. A. Agard, Y. Hiraoka, and J. W. Sedat, “Tilted view reconstruction in optical microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction of Drosophila melanogaster embryo nuclei,” Biophys. J. 55(1), 101–110 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 10

10. M. Fauver, E. J. Seibel, J. R. Rahn, M. G. Meyer, F. W. Patten, T. Neumann, and A. C. Nelson, “Three-dimensional imaging of single isolated cell nuclei using optical projection tomography,” Opt. Express 13(11), 4210–4223 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], because non-mechanical methods using optical forces have not yet established owing to several limitations. First, in the case of using single-beam scanning optical tweezers [5

5. G. Carmon and M. Feingold, “Rotation of single bacterial cells relative to the optical axis using optical tweezers,” Opt. Lett. 36(1), 40–42 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 6

6. Y. Tanaka, K. Hirano, H. Nagata, and M. Ishikawa, “Real-time three-dimensional orientation control of non-spherical micro-objects using laser trapping,” Electron. Lett. 43(7), 412–414 (2007). [CrossRef]

], the control parameters (for example, scanning pattern, and laser power) with regard to the tilt angles (namely, rotation angles around an arbitrary axis perpendicular to the optical axis of an objective lens) strongly depend on the shape and optical properties of samples. This is because their stable posture is a result of a delicate balance between the optical force acting on the broad area by scanning and other forces such as gravity and buoyancy [6

6. Y. Tanaka, K. Hirano, H. Nagata, and M. Ishikawa, “Real-time three-dimensional orientation control of non-spherical micro-objects using laser trapping,” Electron. Lett. 43(7), 412–414 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. Therefore, aside from simple shapes such as rod-shaped bacterium [5

5. G. Carmon and M. Feingold, “Rotation of single bacterial cells relative to the optical axis using optical tweezers,” Opt. Lett. 36(1), 40–42 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], it may be impossible to precisely control complicated samples without an intelligent visual-feedback approach. Secondly, although counter-propagating divergent beam traps with either optical fibers [4

4. M. K. Kreysing, T. Kiessling, A. Fritsch, C. Dietrich, J. R. Guck, and J. A. Käs, “The optical cell rotator,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16984–16992 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] or the GPC method [11

11. D. Palima, A. R. Bañas, G. Vizsnyiczai, L. Kelemen, P. Ormos, and J. Glückstad, “Wave-guided optical waveguides,” Opt. Express 20(3), 2004–2014 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] could well perform the 3D rotation of inhomogeneous samples under objective lenses with low magnifications, custom-made devices for generating counter-propagating beams and the precise alignment of their opposing beams are essential for these methods. The visual-feedback approach is also required [12

12. S. Tauro, A. Bañas, D. Palima, and J. Glückstad, “Dynamic axial stabilization of counter-propagating beam-traps with feedback control,” Opt. Express 18(17), 18217–18222 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], because their axial performances are governed by the wave propagation of opposing beams. Thirdly, in the case of using holographic optical tweezers, the precise 3D rotation of non-spherical micro-objects has not yet been demonstrated to the best of our knowledge, apart from known-shaped sphere-connected structures [13

13. V. Bingelyte, J. Leach, J. Courtial, and M. J. Padgett, “Optically controlled three-dimensional rotation of microscopic objects,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82(5), 829–831 (2003). [CrossRef]

]. This is because the real-time generation of multiple traps with uniform trapping forces at each specified 3D coordinate has not been established, and is a challenging task.

In this paper, we present the 3D rotational control of inhomogeneous biological samples using 3D optical multiple-force clamps based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus-tunable lens. For inhomogeneous samples with shape and optical anisotropy, we choose diatoms and their fragments, and demonstrate interactive and controlled 3D rotation about arbitrary axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates. We also outline the hardware setup and the 3D rotation method for our demonstrations.

2. Optical multiple-force clamps with 3D-T3S optical tweezers

Optical multiple-force clamps are based on multiple-beam optical tweezers, in which some beams irradiate different parts of a single object, maintaining the relative positions of the traps. Time-shared synchronized scanning (T3S) is a suitable method for real-time independent control of multiple traps, as it is simple to generate and change trapping positions, saving computation time in complicated control algorithms based on intelligent control techniques [14

14. Y. Tanaka, H. Kawada, S. Tsutsui, M. Ishikawa, and H. Kitajima, “Dynamic micro-bead arrays using optical tweezers combined with intelligent control techniques,” Opt. Express 17(26), 24102–24111 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In addition, for enhancing precision-based biomedical applications such as tomographic cell imaging and cell stretching [15

15. P. J. H. Bronkhorst, G. J. Streekstra, J. Grimbergen, E. J. Nijhof, J. J. Sixma, and G. J. Brakenhoff, “A new method to study shape recovery of red blood cells using multiple optical trapping,” Biophys. J. 69(5), 1666–1673 (1995). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], T3S optical tweezers based on single-beam gradient-force optical traps using a single objective lens are a practical and low-cost technique, because they can use a commercially available standard microscope and do not require a spatial light modulator (SLM). Furthermore, the T3S method operates not under diffractive optics but under geometrical optics, and therefore the positions of generated traps experience no obscurity, such as the ghost traps emerging in the dynamic hologram using SLMs. Recently, based on the above-mentioned superior features of the T3S approach, we have presented a 3D multiple optical tweezers system with a fast focus-tunable lens [16

16. Y. Tanaka, “3D multiple optical tweezers based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus tunable lens,” J. Opt. 15(2), 025708 (2013). [CrossRef]

]. Thus, in this work, we choose the same 3D-T3S optical tweezers technique for the physical method of applying a 3D optical multiple-force clamps technique.

3. Demonstrations

3.1 Samples

Diatoms, which have silica cell walls consisting of two interlocking valves, are non-spherical, unicellular microscopic algae. The study of diatoms is important for fields such as ecology, palaeoecology, and forensic science [17

17. Y. A. Hicks, D. Marshall, P. L. Rosin, R. R. Martin, D. G. Mann, and S. J. M. Droop, “A model of diatom shape and texture for analysis, synthesis and identification,” Mach. Vis. Appl. 17(5), 297–307 (2006). [CrossRef]

]; some diatoms are also useful for force probing of micro objects [3

3. D. B. Phillips, S. H. Simpson, J. A. Grieve, G. M. Gibson, R. Bowman, M. J. Padgett, M. J. Miles, and D. M. Carberry, “Position clamping of optically trapped microscopic non-spherical probes,” Opt. Express 19(21), 20622–20627 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Many diatoms nearly always offer a repeatable 2D view in images provided by a conventional microscopic observation, because their valves are sufficiently flat that they can lie stably on the microscope slide. Accordingly, we chose diatoms and their fragments as non-spherical samples for our demonstrations. The diatoms were collected from a creek in the Kagawa prefecture of Japan and cleaned in an acid solution to remove organic matter in the samples. We selected diatoms and their fragments ranging in size from 20 to 30 μm long from the viewpoint of acting clamp forces and the visual observation area of their 3D orientation by a color CCD camera with a × 100 objective lens.

3.2 Controlled 3D rotations of diatoms

Here we demonstrate the interactive and controlled 3D rotations of diatoms and their fragments in water using the optical two-, three-, and four-point clamp techniques. The laser power at the entrance pupil of the objective lens (Olympus, UPlanSApo × 100, 1.40 NA, IR) was 300 mW, and the dwell time for scanning each clamp position was 15 ms. In the demonstrations, all the initial clamp points were located on an xy-plane, and subsequent 3D rotations of the clamped samples about arbitrary axes were performed using the 3 × 3 rotation matrices:
Ax=[1000cosθxsinθx0sinθxcosθx],
(1)
Ay=[cosθy0sinθy010sinθy0cosθy],
(2)
and:

Az=[cosθzsinθz0sinθzcosθz0001].
(3)

Figure 3
Fig. 3 Interactive and controlled 3D rotation of the fragment of a diatom. (a) Illustration of the fragment (colored yellow) and optical square-clamp points (shown as red circles). (b–l) (Media 2) Video frame sequence of the controlled rotations of the fragment in the 3D working space. The accompanying movie is in real-time, not accelerated.
(Media 2) shows snapshots of the interactive and controlled 3D rotation of the fragment of a single diatom using the optical four-point clamps. In Fig. 3(a), the clamped fragment is colored yellow in the restoration of the diatom, and the points indicated by letters A, B, and C correspond to the points indicated by the same letters in Figs. 3(b)3(l). The square-clamp points (that is, four-point clamps) illustrated by the red circles in Fig. 3(a) can be identified by the red light spots in Figs. 3(b)3(l), which appear when the coaxial He-Ne laser beams are introduced for visualizing the clamp positions. First, the fragment was clamped stably by four trap points and subsequently rotated to the desired angle θz about the z-axis interactively, by applying the rotation matrix of Eq. (3) (Figs. 3(b)3(d)). Second, by applying the rotation matrix of Eq. (1), the fragment could be rotated by angle θx about the x-axis within an approximate range varying from −60° to 60° degrees (Figs. 3(e)3(h)). However, this fragment turned 90° autonomously if the commanded angle was θx > 60° or θx < −60°, which was due to the undesired release of two of the four clamps (Fig. 3(i)). Third, Figs. 3(j)3(l) show a video frame sequence of another controlled 3D rotation of the same fragment; the fragment was rotated about its shorter axis, which was parallel to the x-axis in the 3D Cartesian coordinates. The 2D views of these postures cannot be observed without controlled rotation using three-point clamps at least. Thus, we were able to control the fragment in the 3D working space to obtain 2D views of different postures.

In another two demonstrations, shown in Fig. 4
Fig. 4 Video frame sequences of 3D rotations of diatoms using two different optical multiple-force clamps (shown as red circles). (a–c) (Media 3) Controlled rotation of the diatom using the optical triangle-clamp points. (d–f) (Media 4) Autonomous rotation of the diatom using the optical two-point clamps. The accompanying movies are in real-time, not accelerated.
, a complete diatom body was rotated in a 3D working space using two different optical multiple-force clamps. In the case of using three-point clamps (Figs. 4(a)4(c), Media 3), a diatom was clamped stably at its valve edges using the triangle-clamp points, which are indicated by the red circles in Fig. 4(a), on an xy-plane. After a controlled rotation of θz = 90° about the z-axis (Fig. 4(b)), the diatom was controlled interactively to rotate about the x-axis (Fig. 4(c)). Consequently, the diatom’s longer axis gradually became parallel to the z-axis in 3D Cartesian coordinates. On the other hand, in the case of using two-point clamps (Figs. 4(d)4(f), Media 4), a similar-shaped diatom was clamped at its raphe sternum (that is, the central area of the diatom) using two trap points. Unlike the three-point clamps method, which can rigidly clamp a non-spherical object, the two-point clamps method cannot clamp it rigidly, because the non-spherical object in a 3D working space has 3DOF of rotation, and a non-controllable 1DOF remains in the clamped object. The axial extent of a two-point clamp is considerably longer than the lateral extent, and diatoms prefer to align themselves along the z-axis if possible [2

2. Y. Tanaka, H. Kawada, K. Hirano, M. Ishikawa, and H. Kitajima, “Automated manipulation of non-spherical micro-objects using optical tweezers combined with image processing techniques,” Opt. Express 16(19), 15115–15122 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 6

6. Y. Tanaka, K. Hirano, H. Nagata, and M. Ishikawa, “Real-time three-dimensional orientation control of non-spherical micro-objects using laser trapping,” Electron. Lett. 43(7), 412–414 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. Therefore, the diatom trapped at its raphe sternum using the two-point clamps autonomously turned 90° about its longer axis (Figs. 4(e)4(f)).

3.3 Discussion

For 6DOF control (that is, 3D translation and 3D rotation) of a rigid body without symmetry, a necessary and sufficient condition is a triangle-clamp on the body and 3D control of the clamp positions while maintaining their relative distances. Our 3D-T3S tweezers system, based on geometrical optics, can simply perform the 6DOF control under this condition, because each clamp position in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be strictly specified by the DA voltages that have a one-to-one correspondence with the 3D Cartesian coordinates. Therefore, the four-point clamps (or clamps of more than four points) on the diatom fragment, as shown in Fig. 3, are redundant for the 6DOF control of a non-spherical object. However, the 6DOF-controlled manipulation can be performed better using the redundant clamps (that is, the square-clamp points) than by using the triangle-clamp points, because the accidental release of some traps or the unavoidable obscuring of clamped positions behind the rotating object often occurs in practical demonstrations.

In many applications that require the 3D rotation of cells, the selection of clamp positions is important both for stable clamps and for no undesired-release of clamps. The margin of the relative distance between clamps is also important for 3D rotation using the 3D-T3S method. This is because the z-axial positions of a clamped object change with rotation around an arbitrary axis perpendicular to z-axis, resulting the settlement of its clamp positions with different z-coordinates has delay owing to the response time of a focus-tunable lens. In our demonstration for diatoms, the most effective clamp positions were their edge (namely, the inner boundary between a cell and ambient water), which can be automatically chosen for the given diatoms using image processing techniques when necessary [2

2. Y. Tanaka, H. Kawada, K. Hirano, M. Ishikawa, and H. Kitajima, “Automated manipulation of non-spherical micro-objects using optical tweezers combined with image processing techniques,” Opt. Express 16(19), 15115–15122 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

For the realization of single-cell CT imaging, the current accuracy of the 3D rotations demonstrated here may be insufficient, owing to the delayed response and distortion of the electrically focus-tunable lens [18

18. F. O. Fahrbach, F. F. Voigt, B. Schmid, F. Helmchen, and J. Huisken, “Rapid 3D light-sheet microscopy with a tunable lens,” Opt. Express 21(18), 21010–21026 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. However, the accuracy will be improved if the system is installed with a vision-feedback scheme based on the measurement [12

12. S. Tauro, A. Bañas, D. Palima, and J. Glückstad, “Dynamic axial stabilization of counter-propagating beam-traps with feedback control,” Opt. Express 18(17), 18217–18222 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] or estimation [19

19. H. Oku, M. Ishikawa, T. Theodorus, and K. Hashimoto, “High-speed autofocusing of a cell using diffraction patterns,” Opt. Express 14(9), 3952–3960 (2006). [CrossRef]

] of the z-axial positions of a clamped object, as well as the precise calibration in z-axis coordinates.

4. Conclusion

We have demonstrated the feasibility of controlled 3D rotation of inhomogeneous biological samples based on an optical multiple-force clamps technique using our 3D-T3S optical tweezers system. This approach easily enabled us to observe the different 2D views of the 3D structure of diatoms and their fragments with natural shapes and optical properties, via interactive and controlled rotation about arbitrary axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates. Although the demonstrations performed here were only controlled 3D rotations, the multiple-force clamps, especially the four-point clamps, based on the 3D-T3S technique can simply provide 6DOF control of a micro-object. This technique can be introduced to applications such as the probing of 3D microstructures [11

11. D. Palima, A. R. Bañas, G. Vizsnyiczai, L. Kelemen, P. Ormos, and J. Glückstad, “Wave-guided optical waveguides,” Opt. Express 20(3), 2004–2014 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 20

20. D. B. Phillips, G. M. Gibson, R. Bowman, M. J. Padgett, S. Hanna, D. M. Carberry, M. J. Miles, and S. H. Simpson, “An optically actuated surface scanning probe,” Opt. Express 20(28), 29679–29693 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], under a commercially available standard microscope. Furthermore, the technique of optical multiple-force clamps can also be expanded to exciting application tools such as 3D noncontact mechanotransduction for live cells [21

21. X. Trepat, L. Deng, S. S. An, D. Navajas, D. J. Tschumperlin, W. T. Gerthoffer, J. P. Butler, and J. J. Fredberg, “Universal physical responses to stretch in the living cell,” Nature 447(7144), 592–595 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Acknowledgment

This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 24560318.

References and links

1.

D. Palima and J. Glückstad, “Gearing up for optical microrobotics: micromanipulation and actuation of synthetic microstructures by optical forces,” Laser Photonics Rev. 7(4), 478–494 (2013). [CrossRef]

2.

Y. Tanaka, H. Kawada, K. Hirano, M. Ishikawa, and H. Kitajima, “Automated manipulation of non-spherical micro-objects using optical tweezers combined with image processing techniques,” Opt. Express 16(19), 15115–15122 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

D. B. Phillips, S. H. Simpson, J. A. Grieve, G. M. Gibson, R. Bowman, M. J. Padgett, M. J. Miles, and D. M. Carberry, “Position clamping of optically trapped microscopic non-spherical probes,” Opt. Express 19(21), 20622–20627 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

M. K. Kreysing, T. Kiessling, A. Fritsch, C. Dietrich, J. R. Guck, and J. A. Käs, “The optical cell rotator,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16984–16992 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

G. Carmon and M. Feingold, “Rotation of single bacterial cells relative to the optical axis using optical tweezers,” Opt. Lett. 36(1), 40–42 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

Y. Tanaka, K. Hirano, H. Nagata, and M. Ishikawa, “Real-time three-dimensional orientation control of non-spherical micro-objects using laser trapping,” Electron. Lett. 43(7), 412–414 (2007). [CrossRef]

7.

F. Hörner, M. Woerdemann, S. Müller, B. Maier, and C. Denz, “Full 3D translational and rotational optical control of multiple rod-shaped bacteria,” J. Biophotonics 3(7), 468–475 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

J. Swoger, P. Verveer, K. Greger, J. Huisken, and E. H. K. Stelzer, “Multi-view image fusion improves resolution in three-dimensional microscopy,” Opt. Express 15(13), 8029–8042 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

P. J. Shaw, D. A. Agard, Y. Hiraoka, and J. W. Sedat, “Tilted view reconstruction in optical microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction of Drosophila melanogaster embryo nuclei,” Biophys. J. 55(1), 101–110 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

M. Fauver, E. J. Seibel, J. R. Rahn, M. G. Meyer, F. W. Patten, T. Neumann, and A. C. Nelson, “Three-dimensional imaging of single isolated cell nuclei using optical projection tomography,” Opt. Express 13(11), 4210–4223 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

D. Palima, A. R. Bañas, G. Vizsnyiczai, L. Kelemen, P. Ormos, and J. Glückstad, “Wave-guided optical waveguides,” Opt. Express 20(3), 2004–2014 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

S. Tauro, A. Bañas, D. Palima, and J. Glückstad, “Dynamic axial stabilization of counter-propagating beam-traps with feedback control,” Opt. Express 18(17), 18217–18222 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

V. Bingelyte, J. Leach, J. Courtial, and M. J. Padgett, “Optically controlled three-dimensional rotation of microscopic objects,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82(5), 829–831 (2003). [CrossRef]

14.

Y. Tanaka, H. Kawada, S. Tsutsui, M. Ishikawa, and H. Kitajima, “Dynamic micro-bead arrays using optical tweezers combined with intelligent control techniques,” Opt. Express 17(26), 24102–24111 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

P. J. H. Bronkhorst, G. J. Streekstra, J. Grimbergen, E. J. Nijhof, J. J. Sixma, and G. J. Brakenhoff, “A new method to study shape recovery of red blood cells using multiple optical trapping,” Biophys. J. 69(5), 1666–1673 (1995). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

Y. Tanaka, “3D multiple optical tweezers based on time-shared scanning with a fast focus tunable lens,” J. Opt. 15(2), 025708 (2013). [CrossRef]

17.

Y. A. Hicks, D. Marshall, P. L. Rosin, R. R. Martin, D. G. Mann, and S. J. M. Droop, “A model of diatom shape and texture for analysis, synthesis and identification,” Mach. Vis. Appl. 17(5), 297–307 (2006). [CrossRef]

18.

F. O. Fahrbach, F. F. Voigt, B. Schmid, F. Helmchen, and J. Huisken, “Rapid 3D light-sheet microscopy with a tunable lens,” Opt. Express 21(18), 21010–21026 (2013). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

H. Oku, M. Ishikawa, T. Theodorus, and K. Hashimoto, “High-speed autofocusing of a cell using diffraction patterns,” Opt. Express 14(9), 3952–3960 (2006). [CrossRef]

20.

D. B. Phillips, G. M. Gibson, R. Bowman, M. J. Padgett, S. Hanna, D. M. Carberry, M. J. Miles, and S. H. Simpson, “An optically actuated surface scanning probe,” Opt. Express 20(28), 29679–29693 (2012). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

X. Trepat, L. Deng, S. S. An, D. Navajas, D. J. Tschumperlin, W. T. Gerthoffer, J. P. Butler, and J. J. Fredberg, “Universal physical responses to stretch in the living cell,” Nature 447(7144), 592–595 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(140.7010) Lasers and laser optics : Laser trapping
(170.0170) Medical optics and biotechnology : Medical optics and biotechnology
(170.4520) Medical optics and biotechnology : Optical confinement and manipulation
(350.4855) Other areas of optics : Optical tweezers or optical manipulation

ToC Category:
Optical Traps, Manipulation, and Tracking

History
Original Manuscript: April 30, 2014
Revised Manuscript: June 9, 2014
Manuscript Accepted: June 13, 2014
Published: June 18, 2014

Citation
Yoshio Tanaka and Shin-ich Wakida, "Controlled 3D rotation of biological cells using optical multiple-force clamps," Biomed. Opt. Express 5, 2341-2348 (2014)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/boe/abstract.cfm?URI=boe-5-7-2341


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References

  1. D. Palima and J. Glückstad, “Gearing up for optical microrobotics: micromanipulation and actuation of synthetic microstructures by optical forces,” Laser Photonics Rev.7(4), 478–494 (2013). [CrossRef]
  2. Y. Tanaka, H. Kawada, K. Hirano, M. Ishikawa, and H. Kitajima, “Automated manipulation of non-spherical micro-objects using optical tweezers combined with image processing techniques,” Opt. Express16(19), 15115–15122 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. D. B. Phillips, S. H. Simpson, J. A. Grieve, G. M. Gibson, R. Bowman, M. J. Padgett, M. J. Miles, and D. M. Carberry, “Position clamping of optically trapped microscopic non-spherical probes,” Opt. Express19(21), 20622–20627 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. M. K. Kreysing, T. Kiessling, A. Fritsch, C. Dietrich, J. R. Guck, and J. A. Käs, “The optical cell rotator,” Opt. Express16(21), 16984–16992 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. G. Carmon and M. Feingold, “Rotation of single bacterial cells relative to the optical axis using optical tweezers,” Opt. Lett.36(1), 40–42 (2011). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. Y. Tanaka, K. Hirano, H. Nagata, and M. Ishikawa, “Real-time three-dimensional orientation control of non-spherical micro-objects using laser trapping,” Electron. Lett.43(7), 412–414 (2007). [CrossRef]
  7. F. Hörner, M. Woerdemann, S. Müller, B. Maier, and C. Denz, “Full 3D translational and rotational optical control of multiple rod-shaped bacteria,” J. Biophotonics3(7), 468–475 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. J. Swoger, P. Verveer, K. Greger, J. Huisken, and E. H. K. Stelzer, “Multi-view image fusion improves resolution in three-dimensional microscopy,” Opt. Express15(13), 8029–8042 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. P. J. Shaw, D. A. Agard, Y. Hiraoka, and J. W. Sedat, “Tilted view reconstruction in optical microscopy. Three-dimensional reconstruction of Drosophila melanogaster embryo nuclei,” Biophys. J.55(1), 101–110 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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