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Journal of the Optical Society of America

Journal of the Optical Society of America

  • Vol. 15, Iss. 2 — Mar. 1, 1927
  • pp: 96–109

A PHOTOELECTRIC PROCESS OF HALFTONE NEGATIVE MAKING APPLICABLE OVER TELEPHONE LINES

HERBERT E. IVES

JOSA, Vol. 15, Issue 2, pp. 96-109 (1927)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSA.15.000096


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Citation
HERBERT E. IVES, "A PHOTOELECTRIC PROCESS OF HALFTONE NEGATIVE MAKING APPLICABLE OVER TELEPHONE LINES," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 15, 96-109 (1927)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josa/abstract.cfm?URI=josa-15-2-96


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References

  1. "Transmission of Pictures over Telephone Lines," Bell System Technical Journal, April 1925. "Some Photographic Problems Encountered in the Transmission of Pictures by Electricity," J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 12, p. 173; 1926.
  2. Frederic E. Ives, 1878.
  3. "Tone Reproduction in the Halftone Photoengraving Process," J.O.S.A. & R.S.I., 13, p. 537; 1926.
  4. The use of the light valve to control the amount of light passing through an out-offocus aperture, or an aperture with shaded edges, was given consideration, but dismissed as unsatisfactory in the light of the previous study of tone rendering by the screen process (reference 3).
  5. See reference 1 for pictures made substantially in this way.
  6. It is obvious that the dot so produced does not lie at the center of the space exposed by the passage of the sector disc. This could be arranged by the use of a pair of ribbons with a tab upon each, but this refinement is of no practical advantage.
  7. One due to Mr. P. Crisson of the American Telephone & Telegraph Co. will be described elsewhere.
  8. A stereotype copy of a bichromated gelatine relief print as used in making the first halftone plates (reference 2) would probably be superior to an etched plate for this purpose. Attention may be called to the fact that figures 7 and 10 have lost some of their characteristic dot shape in reproduction, largely through the etching process employed in making the printing plates.

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