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Journal of the Optical Society of America

Journal of the Optical Society of America

  • Vol. 4, Iss. 5 — Sep. 1, 1920
  • pp: 388–400

Optics InfoBase > JOSA > Volume 4 > Issue 5 > PRELIMINARY NOTE ON THE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE QUALITY OF COLOR AND THE SPECTRAL DISTRIBUTION OF LIGHT IN THE STIMULUS.

PRELIMINARY NOTE ON THE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE QUALITY OF COLOR AND THE SPECTRAL DISTRIBUTION OF LIGHT IN THE STIMULUS.

IRWIN G. PRIEST.

JOSA, Vol. 4, Issue 5, pp. 388-400 (1920)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSA.4.000388


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IRWIN G. PRIEST., "PRELIMINARY NOTE ON THE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE QUALITY OF COLOR AND THE SPECTRAL DISTRIBUTION OF LIGHT IN THE STIMULUS.," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 4, 388-400 (1920)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josa/abstract.cfm?URI=josa-4-5-388


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References

  1. Color is the sensation due to stimulation of the optic nerve.
  2. The manner of treatment followed in this paper is perhaps vaguely foreshadowed by the work of Sir Isaac Newton (Optics, London, 1730, 4th Ed., pp. 134 to 141), and H. Grassman (Zur Theorie der Farbenmischung, Pogg. Ann. 89, pp. 69–84; 1853: Ges. Werke, Leipzig, 1904, Vol. 2, part 2, pp. 161–173). It is obvious, however, on consideration of the nature of the data dealt with in the present paper, that the similarity of treatment can be only of the most general nature, for such quantitative data were necessarily entirely lacking to these early investigators. In modern works the closest approaches which the author has found to the problem are given by Parsons, “Introduction to the Study of Color Vision,” Cambridge, 1915, Part i, Sec. ii, Chap, iii; H. E. Ives, “The Transformation of Color Mixture Equations,” Jour. Frank. Inst., Dec. 1915, PP. 673–701; and Luckiesh, “The Physical Basis of Color Technology,” Jour. Frank. Inst., July and August, 1917.
  3. Report to Chas. Bittinger on B. S. Test No. 28,479, June, 1920.
  4. Diro Kitao, Zur Farbenlehre, Inaug. Dis., Goettingen, 1878, and Abh. Tokio University, No. 12, 1885; Koenig, Ann. der Phy., 17, pp. 990–I008, 1882; Brodhun, Ann. der Phy., 34, pp. 897–918, 1888; Priest, “A New Study of the Leucoscope,” forthcoming paper in JOUR, OF OPTICAL SOC. OF AMERICA.
  5. Leo Arons, Ann. der Phy. (4), 39, pp. 545–568, 1912; Priest, Pro. Soc. Cot. Prod. Analysts, May, 1914. (There are several serious misprints.) Priest, “The Application of Rotatory Dispersion to Colorimetry,” Phy. Rev. (2), 15, pp. 538, 539, 1920; and forthcoming paper, JOUR. OPTICAL SOC. OF AMERICA.
  6. For other graphs of absorption spectra see: Priest, “Color of Soya Bean Oil,” Chemists’ Section, Cotton Oil Press, Jan., 1920; Priest, Mc-Nicholas and Frehafer, “The Color and Spectral Transmissivity of Vegetable Oils and An Examination of the Lovibond Color Scale,” forthcoming papers, Cotton Oil Press and B. S. Tech. Pap.
  7. Phy. Rev. (2), II, p. 502, 1918, Fig. I, open circles.
  8. Phil. Mag., Dec, 1912, p. 859.
  9. Astrop. Jour., 48, p. 87, 1918.
  10. B. S. Sci. Pap. 303, Table 5.
  11. By means of an Amsler planimeter, making several check determinations. In nearly all cases, check determinations have been made by different operators in order to avoid blunders. In a few cases, check determinations have also been made by mechanical balancing on a knife edge. The final results obtained are accurate to about 0.5 millimicron.
  12. The generality of this conclusion is, of course, limited by the extent of the data considered. The reader will note, however, the diversity of the data, including the confirmatory data on monochromatic analysis in the latter part of this paper. The converse of this proposition is not necessarily true; two spectral distributions of light may have the same wavelength of centre of gravity and not excite colors of the same quality if the lights in the two cases are distributed over different ranges of wave-length. In order that they may excite colors of the same quality another condition must be satisfied. Further study is being given to the formulation of. this condition.
  13. Steindler, Wien. Sits. 115, 2 A., p. 39, 1906; Nutting, Bull. B. S. 6, pp. 89–93.1909.(The decimal point in the tabulated values column 2, Table II, is one place too far to right.) Jones, JOUR. OPTICAL SOC. OF AMERICA, I, pp. 63–77, 1917.
  14. Nutting, Bull. B. S. 9, p. 1, 1913.
  15. Op. Soc. of Am., Com. on Standards and Nomenclature, Sub-com. on Colorimetry, Report, 1919 (Preliminary Draft), pp. 28 and 38. Copy in Bur. Stands. Library, Washington.
  16. Page 397.
  17. L. A. Jones, I. E. S. g, p. 691, 1914.
  18. Hyde and Forsythe, Jour. Frank. Inst., 183, pp. 353, 354, 1917.
  19. Wesson, Cotton Oil Press, Chemists' Section, Table I, p. 66, July, 1920.

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