OSA's Digital Library

Journal of the Optical Society of America

Journal of the Optical Society of America

  • Vol. 70, Iss. 11 — Nov. 1, 1980
  • pp: 1375–1377

Temporal selectivity of changing-size channels

K. I. Beverley and D. Regan  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA, Vol. 70, Issue 11, pp. 1375-1377 (1980)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSA.70.001375


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (680 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

Changing-size channels tuned to the oscillation frequency are excited by a stimulus square whose size oscillates at a fixed frequency. In the 0.25–16 Hz frequency band there are at least three kinds of changing-size channels tuned to different frequencies.

© 1980 Optical Society of America

Citation
K. I. Beverley and D. Regan, "Temporal selectivity of changing-size channels," J. Opt. Soc. Am. 70, 1375-1377 (1980)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josa/abstract.cfm?URI=josa-70-11-1375


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset

References

  1. D. Regan and K. I. Beverley, "Looming detectors in the human visual pathway," Vision Res. 18, 415–421 (1978).
  2. D. Regan and K. I. Beverley, "Visual responses to changing size and to sideways motion for different directions of motion in depth: linearization of visual responses," J. Opt. Soc. Am 70, 1289–1296 (1980).
  3. D. Regan, K. I. Beverley, and M. Cynader, "Stereoscopic subsystems for position in depth and for motion in depth," Proc. R. Soc. London, Sec. B 204, 485–501 (1979).
  4. D. Regan, K. I. Beverley, and M. Cynader, "The visual perception of motion in depth," Sci. Am. 241, 136–151 (1979).
  5. D. Regan and M. Cynader, "Neurons in area 18 of cat visual cortex selectively sensitive to changing size: nonlinear interactions between the responses to two edges," Vision Res. 19, 699–711 (1979).
  6. K. I. Beverley and D. Regan, "Visual perception of changing size: the effect of object size." Vision Res. 19, 1093–1104 (1979).
  7. The data from two subjects were discarded. Individual subject means for all remaining subjects were averaged for each plotted point. Between two and seven subjects contributed to each point with a mean number of 3.6 subjects for each antiphase condition and 3.0 subjects for each inphase condition. Vertical lines indicate 1 standard error based on the total number of experimental settings for that condition.
  8. The following sets out the grounds on which we rejected the hypothesis that no more than two subsystems were adequate to explain our data. First, we examined whether the antiphase peak for adapt 2 Hz is at a different frequency from the antiphase peak for adapt 8 Hz. Threshold elevations for adapt 2 Hz test 0.5 Hz were greater than elevations for adapt 8 Hz test 0.5 Hz at the 0.01 level (t test). Threshold elevations for adapt 2 Hz test 12 Hz were smaller than elevations for adapt 8 Hz test 12 Hz at the 0.001 level. Therefore these two peaks were at different frequencies so that we have at least two subsystems. Then we tested whether three (or more) subsystems were needed to explain the data of Fig. 1. If there were only two subsystems with peak sensitivities at (say) 0.5 Hz and 12 Hz, then adapting at 4 Hz would have produced either a bimodal elevation curve with subpeaks near 0.5 Hz and 12 Hz, or a flat-topped elevation curve extending from about 0.5 Hz to 12 Hz. This was not so, as shown by the following treatment. Threshold elevations for adapt 4 Hz test 0.5 Hz were less than elevations for adapt 2 Hz test 0.5 Hz at the 0.02 level, while elevations for adapt 4 Hz test 4 Hz were greater than elevations for adapt 2 Hz test 4 Hz at the 0.001 level. Also, elevations for adapt 4 Hz test 4 Hz were greater than elevations for adapt 8 Hz test 4 Hz at the 0.001 level, while elevations for adapt 4 Hz test 12 Hz were less than elevations for adapt 8 Hz test 12 Hz at the 0.005 level.
  9. R. A. Smith, "Adaptation of visual contrast sensitivity to specific temporal frequencies," Vision Res. 10, 275–279 (1970).
  10. W. Richards, "Flashback to Maxwell: flicker matching," OSA Annual Meeting, Boston (1975).
  11. A. Pantle, "Flicker adaptation-I: Effect on visual sensitivity to temporal fluctuations of light intensity," Vision Res., 11, 943–952 (1971).
  12. T. H. Nilsson, C. F. Richmond, and T. M. Nelson, "Flicker adaptation shows evidence of many visual channels selectively sensitive to temporal frequency," Vision Res. 15, 621–624 (1975).
  13. D. Regan, "Chromatic adaptation and steady-state evoked potentials," Vision Res. 8, 149–158 (1968).
  14. D. Regan, Evoked Potentials in Psychology, Sensory Physiology and Clinical Medicine (Chapman and Hall, London, and Wiley, New York, 1972).

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited