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Journal of the Optical Society of America A

Journal of the Optical Society of America A

| OPTICS, IMAGE SCIENCE, AND VISION

  • Editor: Franco Gori
  • Vol. 29, Iss. 2 — Feb. 1, 2012
  • pp: A1–A9

Chromatic discrimination: differential contributions from two adapting fields

Dingcai Cao and Yolanda H. Lu  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA A, Vol. 29, Issue 2, pp. A1-A9 (2012)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAA.29.0000A1


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Abstract

To test whether a retinal or cortical mechanism sums contributions from two adapting fields to chromatic discrimination, L/M discrimination was measured with a test annulus surrounded by an inner circular field and an outer rectangular field. A retinal summation mechanism predicted that the discrimination pattern would not change with a change in the fixation location. Therefore, the fixation was set either in the inner or the outer field in two experiments. When one of the adapting fields was “red” and the other was “green,” the adapting field where the observer fixated always had a stronger influence on chromatic discrimination. However, when one adapting field was “white” and the other was red or green, the white field always weighted more heavily than the other adapting field in determining discrimination thresholds, whether the white field or the fixation was in the inner or outer adapting field. These results suggest that a cortical mechanism determines the relative contributions from different adapting fields.

© 2012 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(330.1690) Vision, color, and visual optics : Color
(330.4060) Vision, color, and visual optics : Vision modeling
(330.5510) Vision, color, and visual optics : Psychophysics
(330.7320) Vision, color, and visual optics : Vision adaptation

ToC Category:
Chromatic discrimination

History
Original Manuscript: August 3, 2011
Revised Manuscript: October 10, 2011
Manuscript Accepted: October 17, 2011
Published: November 15, 2011

Virtual Issues
Vol. 7, Iss. 4 Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

Citation
Dingcai Cao and Yolanda H. Lu, "Chromatic discrimination: differential contributions from two adapting fields," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 29, A1-A9 (2012)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josaa/abstract.cfm?URI=josaa-29-2-A1


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