OSA's Digital Library

Journal of the Optical Society of America A

Journal of the Optical Society of America A

| OPTICS, IMAGE SCIENCE, AND VISION

  • Vol. 15, Iss. 9 — Sep. 1, 1998
  • pp: 2536–2544

Predicting the effects of optical defocus on human contrast sensitivity

David A. Atchison, Russell L. Woods, and Arthur Bradley  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA A, Vol. 15, Issue 9, pp. 2536-2544 (1998)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAA.15.002536


View Full Text Article

Enhanced HTML    Acrobat PDF (279 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We used diffraction modulation transfer functions and model eyes to predict the effect of defocus on the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) and compared these predictions with previously published experimental data. Using the principle that optically induced changes in the modulation transfer function should be paralleled by identical changes in the CSF, we used the modulation transfer function calculations with the best-focus CSF measurements to predict the defocused CSF. An aberration-free model predicted the effects of defocus well when the CSF was measured with small pupils (e.g., 2 mm) but not with larger pupils (6–8 mm). When the model included average aberrations, prediction of the defocused CSF with large pupils was better but remained inaccurate, failing, in particular, to reflect differences between individual subjects. Inclusion of measured aberrations for individual subjects provided accurate predictions in the shape of the monochromatic CSF of two of three subjects with hyperopic defocus and good predictions of the polychromatic CSF of two subjects with hyperopic defocus. Prediction of the effects of myopic defocus by use of measured individual aberrations of one subject were less successful. Hence a diffraction optics model can provide good predictions of the effects of defocus on the human CSF, given that one has knowledge of the individual ocular aberrations. These predictions are dependent on the quality of the aberration measurements.

© 1998 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(110.3000) Imaging systems : Image quality assessment
(110.4100) Imaging systems : Modulation transfer function
(220.1000) Optical design and fabrication : Aberration compensation
(330.1800) Vision, color, and visual optics : Vision - contrast sensitivity

History
Original Manuscript: December 12, 1997
Revised Manuscript: May 19, 1998
Manuscript Accepted: May 20, 1998
Published: September 1, 1998

Citation
David A. Atchison, Russell L. Woods, and Arthur Bradley, "Predicting the effects of optical defocus on human contrast sensitivity," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 15, 2536-2544 (1998)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josaa/abstract.cfm?URI=josaa-15-9-2536

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Citation lists with outbound citation links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Cited by links are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Figure files are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

You do not have subscription access to this journal. Article level metrics are available to subscribers only. You may subscribe either as an OSA member, or as an authorized user of your institution.

Contact your librarian or system administrator
or
Log in to access OSA Member Subscription

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited