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Journal of the Optical Society of America A

Journal of the Optical Society of America A

| OPTICS, IMAGE SCIENCE, AND VISION

  • Editor: Franco Gori
  • Vol. 31, Iss. 4 — Apr. 1, 2014
  • pp: A303–A306

Recognition of simulated cyanosis by color-vision-normal and color-vision-deficient subjects

Stephen J. Dain  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA A, Vol. 31, Issue 4, pp. A303-A306 (2014)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAA.31.00A303


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Abstract

There are anecdotal reports that the recognition of cyanosis is difficult for some color-deficient observers. The chromaticity changes of blood with oxygenation in vitro lie close to the dichromatic confusion lines. The chromaticity changes of lips and nail beds measured in vivo are also generally aligned in the same way. Experiments involving visual assessment of cyanosis in vivo are fraught with technical and ethical difficulties A single lower face image of a healthy individual was digitally altered to produce levels of simulated cyanosis. The color change is essentially one of saturation. Some images with other color changes were also included to ensure that there was no propensity to identify those as cyanosed. The images were assessed for reality by a panel of four instructors from the NSW Ambulance Service training section. The images were displayed singly and the observer was required to identify if the person was cyanosed or not. Color normal subjects comprised 32 experienced ambulance officers and 27 new recruits. Twenty-seven color deficient subjects (non-NSW Ambulance Service) were examined. The recruits were less accurate and slower at identifying the cyanosed images and the color vision deficient were less accurate and slower still. The identification of cyanosis is a skill that improves with training and is adversely affected in color deficient observers.

© 2014 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(330.0330) Vision, color, and visual optics : Vision, color, and visual optics
(330.1690) Vision, color, and visual optics : Color
(330.1720) Vision, color, and visual optics : Color vision
(330.4300) Vision, color, and visual optics : Vision system - noninvasive assessment
(330.5510) Vision, color, and visual optics : Psychophysics
(330.7310) Vision, color, and visual optics : Vision

ToC Category:
Variations and deficiencies of color vision

History
Original Manuscript: October 8, 2013
Revised Manuscript: January 15, 2014
Manuscript Accepted: January 18, 2014
Published: February 25, 2014

Virtual Issues
Vol. 9, Iss. 6 Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

Citation
Stephen J. Dain, "Recognition of simulated cyanosis by color-vision-normal and color-vision-deficient subjects," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 31, A303-A306 (2014)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josaa/abstract.cfm?URI=josaa-31-4-A303


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References

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