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Journal of the Optical Society of America B

Journal of the Optical Society of America B

| OPTICAL PHYSICS

  • Vol. 15, Iss. 1 — Jan. 1, 1998
  • pp: 103–117

Perturbative model for nonstationary second-order cascaded effects

Guido Toci, Matteo Vannini, and Renzo Salimbeni  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA B, Vol. 15, Issue 1, pp. 103-117 (1998)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAB.15.000103


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Abstract

We report a semianalytical solution describing the type I second-order nonlinear interaction of the fundamental and the second-harmonic fields in a nonlinear crystal, which accounts for the phase- and group-velocity mismatch of the interacting pulses. The method uses a series-development solution of the propagation equations in respect to the second-harmonic conversion efficiency. The method describes the self-phase and self-amplitude modulation experienced by the fundamental pulse in single- and double-pass (i.e., reinjecting into the nonlinear crystal the outgoing pulses) interaction geometries, following better with respect to a numerical analysis, the dependence from the propagation parameters such as the crystal length, the pulse duration, and the phase- and group-velocity mismatch. It appears that it is possible to obtain an efficient self-phase modulation on the fundamental field even in nonstationary conditions. This paper describes the advantages of a double-pass configuration, which, for a given crystal length, allows a stronger nonlinear phase modulation of the fundamental field and minimizes its losses toward the second harmonic.

© 1998 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(190.0190) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics
(190.4410) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics, parametric processes
(320.7110) Ultrafast optics : Ultrafast nonlinear optics

Citation
Guido Toci, Matteo Vannini, and Renzo Salimbeni, "Perturbative model for nonstationary second-order cascaded effects," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 103-117 (1998)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josab/abstract.cfm?URI=josab-15-1-103


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