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Journal of the Optical Society of America B

Journal of the Optical Society of America B

| OPTICAL PHYSICS

  • Vol. 15, Iss. 2 — Feb. 1, 1998
  • pp: 817–825

Femtosecond Z-scan and degenerate four-wave mixing measurements of real and imaginary parts of the third-order nonlinearity of soluble conjugated polymers

Marek Samoc, Anna Samoc, Barry Luther-Davies, Zhenan Bao, Luping Yu, Bing Hsieh, and Ullrich Scherf  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA B, Vol. 15, Issue 2, pp. 817-825 (1998)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAB.15.000817


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Abstract

We investigated the third-order nonlinear optical properties of several soluble π-conjugated polymers with a goal of reliable determination of the parameters that characterize the nonlinearity, such as the real and imaginary parts of the nonlinear refractive index n2 and the one-photon loss and two-photon loss merit factors W and T, respectively. The measurements were performed at 800 nm with 100-fs pulses from an amplified Ti:sapphire system. We present results of investigations of several 2, 5-substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylenes), including poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)-p-phenylenevinylene] and a soluble ladder poly (p-phenylene) polymer. In particular, Z-scan measurements of polymer solutions were found to be useful for the determination of the complex nonlinear refractive index. The results could be verified by time-dependent degenerate four-wave mixing studies performed on thin films of the polymers. We found generally good agreement between the values of n2 determined from Z scan and those from degenerate four-wave mixing. The results indicate that the nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10−12 cm2/W can be readily obtained for various conjugated polymers. However, the two-photon merit factors T larger than unity are commonly encountered within the two-photon absorption ranges of these compounds.

© 1998 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(160.4330) Materials : Nonlinear optical materials
(160.5470) Materials : Polymers
(190.4380) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics, four-wave mixing
(190.4710) Nonlinear optics : Optical nonlinearities in organic materials

Citation
Marek Samoc, Anna Samoc, Barry Luther-Davies, Zhenan Bao, Luping Yu, Bing Hsieh, and Ullrich Scherf, "Femtosecond Z-scan and degenerate four-wave mixing measurements of real and imaginary parts of the third-order nonlinearity of soluble conjugated polymers," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 817-825 (1998)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josab/abstract.cfm?URI=josab-15-2-817


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