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Journal of the Optical Society of America B

Journal of the Optical Society of America B

| OPTICAL PHYSICS

  • Vol. 21, Iss. 10 — Oct. 1, 2004
  • pp: 1833–1838

Simulation of group-velocity-dependent phase shift induced by refractive-index change in an air-bridge-type AlGaAs two-dimensional photonic crystal slab waveguide

Yoshinori Watanabe, Noritsugu Yamamoto, Kazuhiro Komori, Hitoshi Nakamura, Yoshimasa Sugimoto, Yu Tanaka, Naoki Ikeda, Kiyoshi Asakawa, and Kuon Inoue  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA B, Vol. 21, Issue 10, pp. 1833-1838 (2004)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAB.21.001833


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Abstract

We report on a theoretical study of a refractive-index-change- (Δn-) induced phase shift enhanced by the low group velocity in an air-bridge-type AlGaAs two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal (PC) slab waveguide. The calculation was based on a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method for the design of a phase-shift arm of the 2-D PC-based symmetric Mach–Zehnder- (SMZ-) type all-optical switch. Δn was assumed to be induced by an optical nonlinearity of InAs quantum dots embedded selectively in the phase-shift arm in the PC SMZ. By changing Δn from 0 to -0.01 and -0.1 for an even guided mode in the triangular-lattice single-line-defect waveguide in the PC SMZ, we calculated a group-velocity-dependent phase shift as well as a band diagram and a transmission spectrum. The result showed that the phase shift is almost inversely proportional to the group velocity. Taking into account Δn of approximately -0.001 predicted for actual InAs quantum dots, we evaluated the length of the phase-shift arm, necessary for the π phase shift in the PC SMZ, to be ∼100 µm for a group velocity of 0.031c and a lattice constant of 0.36 µm at a wavelength of ∼1.3 µm, where c is the light velocity in the vacuum. The length of the phase-shift arm was significantly reduced because of the low group velocity in spite of the small Δn. As a result, it was found that the phase-shift arm can be designed short enough to achieve a compact ultrafast all-optical switch.

© 2004 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(230.3990) Optical devices : Micro-optical devices
(230.7400) Optical devices : Waveguides, slab
(320.7080) Ultrafast optics : Ultrafast devices

Citation
Yoshinori Watanabe, Noritsugu Yamamoto, Kazuhiro Komori, Hitoshi Nakamura, Yoshimasa Sugimoto, Yu Tanaka, Naoki Ikeda, Kiyoshi Asakawa, and Kuon Inoue, "Simulation of group-velocity-dependent phase shift induced by refractive-index change in an air-bridge-type AlGaAs two-dimensional photonic crystal slab waveguide," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21, 1833-1838 (2004)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josab/abstract.cfm?URI=josab-21-10-1833


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