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Journal of the Optical Society of America B

Journal of the Optical Society of America B

| OPTICAL PHYSICS

  • Vol. 21, Iss. 12 — Dec. 1, 2004
  • pp: 2197–2205

Pattern formation in a ring cavity with temporally incoherent feedback

Tal Schwartz, Jason W. Fleischer, Oren Cohen, Hrvoje Buljan, Mordechai Segev, and Tal Carmon  »View Author Affiliations


JOSA B, Vol. 21, Issue 12, pp. 2197-2205 (2004)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAB.21.002197


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Abstract

We present a theoretical and experimental study of modulation instability and pattern formation in a passive nonlinear optical cavity that is longer than the coherence length of the light circulating in it. Pattern formation in this cavity exhibits various features of a second-order phase transition, closely resembling laser action.

© 2004 Optical Society of America

OCIS Codes
(190.3100) Nonlinear optics : Instabilities and chaos
(190.4420) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics, transverse effects in

Citation
Tal Schwartz, Jason W. Fleischer, Oren Cohen, Hrvoje Buljan, Mordechai Segev, and Tal Carmon, "Pattern formation in a ring cavity with temporally incoherent feedback," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21, 2197-2205 (2004)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/josab/abstract.cfm?URI=josab-21-12-2197


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References

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