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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 10 — May. 10, 2010
  • pp: 10888–10895

Effects of scatterers’ sizes on near-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under tightly focused radially and linearly polarized light excitation

Jian Lin, Wei Zheng, Haifeng Wang, and Zhiwei Huang  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 10, pp. 10888-10895 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.010888


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Abstract

We employ the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique as a numerical approach to studying the effects of scatterers’ sizes on near-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy under tightly focused radially and linearly polarized light excitations. The FDTD results show that in a uniform medium (water), the full width at half maximum (FWHM) (transverse resolution) of radially polarized near-field CARS (RP-CARS) radiation is approximately 7.7% narrower than that of linearly polarized near-field CARS (LP-CARS) imaging, whereas the depth of focus (DOF) of RP-CARS radiation is 6.5% longer than LP-CARS. However, with the presence of scatterers in the uniform medium, both the FHWM and DOF of near-field RP-CARS radiation become much narrower compared to those of near-field LP-CARS radiation. In addition, the signal to nonresonant background ratio of near-field RP-CARS is significantly improved when the scatterer’s size is larger than a half wavelength of the pump light field. This work suggests that near-field CARS radiations are strongly influenced by the scatterers’ sizes in the medium; and near-field RP-CARS microscopy is superior to the near-field LP-CARS by providing both higher transverse and axial resolutions for three-dimensional molecular imaging of fine structures in biological systems.

© 2010 OSA

OCIS Codes
(180.6900) Microscopy : Three-dimensional microscopy
(260.5430) Physical optics : Polarization
(290.5850) Scattering : Scattering, particles
(300.6230) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

History
Original Manuscript: January 4, 2010
Revised Manuscript: March 16, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: April 12, 2010
Published: May 10, 2010

Virtual Issues
Vol. 5, Iss. 9 Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics
Unconventional Polarization States of Light (2010) Optics Express

Citation
Jian Lin, Wei Zheng, Haifeng Wang, and Zhiwei Huang, "Effects of scatterers’ sizes on near-field coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under tightly focused radially and linearly polarized light excitation," Opt. Express 18, 10888-10895 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-10-10888


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