OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 12 — Jun. 8, 2009
  • pp: 10265–10276

Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements

J.J. Laserna, R. Fernández Reyes, R. González, L. Tobaria, and P. Lucena  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 12, pp. 10265-10276 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.010265


View Full Text Article

Enhanced HTML    Acrobat PDF (320 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We report on an experimental study of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. The characteristics of the atmosphere dictate specific performance constraints to this technology. Unlike classical laboratory LIBS systems where the distance to the sample is well known and characterized, LIBS systems working at several tens of meters to the target have specific atmospheric propagation conditions that cause the quality of the LIBS signals to be affected to a significant extent. Using a new LIBS based sensor system fitted with a nanosecond laser emitting at 1064 nm, propagation effects at distances of up to 120 m were investigated. The effects observed include wander and scintillation in the outgoing laser beam and in the return atomic emission signal. Plasmas were formed on aluminium targets. Average signal levels and signal fluctuations are measured so the effect of atmospheric turbulence on LIBS measurements is quantified.

© 2009 OSA

OCIS Codes
(010.1300) Atmospheric and oceanic optics : Atmospheric propagation
(120.0280) Instrumentation, measurement, and metrology : Remote sensing and sensors
(280.1545) Remote sensing and sensors : Chemical analysis
(300.6365) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, laser induced breakdown

ToC Category:
Remote Sensing and Sensors

History
Original Manuscript: April 3, 2009
Revised Manuscript: May 13, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: June 1, 2009
Published: June 4, 2009

Citation
J.J. Laserna, R. Fernández Reyes, R. González, L. Tobaria, and P. Lucena, "Study on the effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on standoff nanosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements," Opt. Express 17, 10265-10276 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-12-10265


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. S. Palanco, S. Conesa, and J. J. Laserna, “Analytical control of liquid steel in an induction melting furnace using a remote laser induced plasma spectrometer,” J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 19(4), 462–467 (2004). [CrossRef]
  2. U. Panne, R. E. Neuhauser, C. Haisch, H. Fink, and R. Niessner, “Remote analysis of a mineral melt by Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy,” Appl. Spectrosc. 56(3), 375–380 (2002). [CrossRef]
  3. A. I. Whitehouse, “Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and its application to the remote characterization of hazardous materials,” Spectroscopy Europe 18, 14–21 (2006).
  4. R. Grönlund, M. Lundqvist, and S. Svanberg, “Remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and remote cultural heritage ablative cleaning,” Opt. Lett. 30(21), 2882–2884 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. B. Sallé, P. Mauchien, and S. Maurice, “Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in open-path configuration for the analysis of distant objects,” Spectrochim. Acta, B At. Spectrosc. 62(8), 739–768 (2007). [CrossRef]
  6. J. J. Laserna, in First International Conference on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Applications (LIBS 2000), (personal communication, 2000).
  7. S. Palanco, J. M. Baena, and J. J. Laserna, “Open-path laser-induced plasma spectrometry for remote analytical measurements on solid surfaces,” Spectrochim. Acta, B At. Spectrosc. 57(3), 591–599 (2002). [CrossRef]
  8. J. M. Vadillo, P. L. García, S. Palanco, D. Romero, J. M. Baena, and J. J. Laserna, “Remote, real-time, on-line monitoring of high-temperature samples by noninvasive open-path laser plasma spectrometry,” Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 375(8), 1144–1147 (2003). [PubMed]
  9. R. Grönlund, M. Lundqvist, and S. Svanberg, “Remote imaging laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy using nanosecond pulses from a mobile lidar system,” Appl. Spectrosc. 60(8), 853–859 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. S. Palanco, C. Lopez Moreno, and J. J. Laserna, “Design, construction and assessment of a field-deployable laser-induced breakdown spectrometer for remote elemental sensing,” Spectrochim. Acta, B At. Spectrosc. 61(1), 88–95 (2006). [CrossRef]
  11. L. C. Andrews, and R. L. Phillips, Laser Beam Propagation through Random Media 2nd Ed (SPIE Press, Bellingham, 2005).
  12. A. Zilberman, N. S. Kopeida, and Y. Sorani, Laser beam widening as a function of elevation in the atmosphere for horizontal propagation, Proc. SPIE Laser Weapons Technology II, vol. 4376, 2001.
  13. E. Friedman, and J. L. Miller, Photonics Rules of Thumb 2nd. Ed. (McGraw-Hill New York, 2004), pp. 176.
  14. A. Ferrero and J. J. Laserna, “A theoretical study of atmospheric propagation of laser and return light for stand-off laser induced breakdown spectroscopy purposes,” Spectrochimica Acta Part B 63(2), 305–311 (2008). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited