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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 25 — Dec. 7, 2009
  • pp: 22735–22746

In vivo real-time recording of UV-induced changes in the autofluorescence of a melanin-containing fungus using a micro-spectrofluorimeter and a low-cost webcam

V. Raimondi, G. Agati, G. Cecchi, I. Gomoiu, D. Lognoli, and L. Palombi  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 25, pp. 22735-22746 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.022735


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Abstract

An optical epifluorescence microscope, coupled to a CCD camera, a standard webcam and a microspectrofluorimeter, are used to record in vivo real-time changes in the autofluorescence of spores and hyphae in Aspergillus niger, a fungus containing melanin, while exposed to UV irradiation. The results point out major changes in both signal intensity and the spectral shape of the autofluorescence signal after only few minutes of exposure, and can contribute to the interpretation of data obtained with other fluorescence techniques, including those, such as GPF labeling, in which endogenous fluorophores constitute a major disturbance.

© 2009 OSA

OCIS Codes
(170.1420) Medical optics and biotechnology : Biology
(170.3880) Medical optics and biotechnology : Medical and biological imaging
(170.6280) Medical optics and biotechnology : Spectroscopy, fluorescence and luminescence
(180.2520) Microscopy : Fluorescence microscopy
(300.6280) Spectroscopy : Spectroscopy, fluorescence and luminescence

ToC Category:
Medical Optics and Biotechnology

History
Original Manuscript: April 30, 2009
Revised Manuscript: September 21, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: November 6, 2009
Published: November 30, 2009

Virtual Issues
Vol. 5, Iss. 1 Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

Citation
V. Raimondi, G. Agati, G. Cecchi, I. Gomoiu, D. Lognoli, and L. Palombi, "In vivo real-time recording of UV-induced changes in the autofluorescence of a melanin-containing fungus using a micro-spectrofluorimeter and a low-cost webcam," Opt. Express 17, 22735-22746 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-25-22735


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