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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 2 — Jan. 18, 2010
  • pp: 1049–1058

Birefringent device converts a standard scanning microscope into a STED microscope that also maps molecular orientation

Matthias Reuss, Johann Engelhardt, and Stefan W. Hell  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 2, pp. 1049-1058 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.001049


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Abstract

Stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy usually employs a scanning excitation beam that is superimposed by a donut-shaped STED beam for keeping the fluorophores at the periphery of the excitation spot dark. Here, we introduce a simple birefringent device that produces a donut-shaped focal spot with suitable polarization for STED, while leaving the excitation spot virtually intact. The device instantly converts a scanning (confocal) microscope with a co-aligned STED beam into a full-blown STED microscope. The donut can be adapted to reveal, through the resulting fluorescence image, the orientation of fluorophores in the sample, thus directly providing subdiffraction resolution images of molecular orientation.

© 2010 OSA

OCIS Codes
(000.2170) General : Equipment and techniques
(180.2520) Microscopy : Fluorescence microscopy
(350.5730) Other areas of optics : Resolution
(080.4865) Geometric optics : Optical vortices

ToC Category:
Microscopy

History
Original Manuscript: November 12, 2009
Revised Manuscript: December 28, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: December 28, 2009
Published: January 7, 2010

Virtual Issues
Vol. 5, Iss. 3 Virtual Journal for Biomedical Optics

Citation
Matthias Reuss, Johann Engelhardt, and Stefan W. Hell, "Birefringent device converts a standard scanning microscope into a STED microscope that also maps molecular orientation," Opt. Express 18, 1049-1058 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-2-1049


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References

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