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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 16, Iss. 11 — May. 26, 2008
  • pp: 8067–8076
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Zero-broadening SBS slow light propagation in an optical fiber using two broadband pump beams

Shihe Wang, Liyong Ren, Yu Liu, and Yasuo Tomita  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 16, Issue 11, pp. 8067-8076 (2008)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.16.008067


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Abstract

A new method of tailoring stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) gain spectrum for slow light propagation is proposed by use of two Gaussian-shaped broadband pump beams with different powers and spectral widths. The central frequency interval between the two pump beams are carefully set to be two inherent Brillouin frequency shift, ensuring that the gain spectrum of one pump has the same central frequency with the loss spectrum of the other one. Different gain profiles are obtained and analyzed. Among them a special gain profile is found that ensures a zero-broadening of the signal pulse independent of the Brillouin gain. This is owing to the compensation between the positive gain-dependent broadening and the negative GVD (group velocity dispersion) dependent broadening. The relationship of two pump beams is also found for constructing such a gain profile. It provides us a new idea of managing the broadening of SBS-based slow pulse by artificially constructing and optimizing the profile of gain spectrum.

© 2008 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) slow light in an optical fiber has attracted a wide attention since the first demonstration [1

1. K. Y. Song, M. G. Herráez, and L. Thévenaz, “Observation of pulse delaying and advancement in optical fibers using stimulated Brillouin scattering,” Opt. Express 13, 82–88 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 2

2. Y. Okawachi, M. S. Bigelow, J. E. Sharping, Z. M. Zhu, A. Schweinsberg, D. J. Gauthier, R. W. Boyd, and A. L. Gaeta, “Tunable all-optical delays via Brillouin slow light in an optical fiber,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, Art. No. 153902 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. It has several advantages such as the simplicity, the low threshold of pump power, the compatibility to fiber-optic communication systems and the flexibility of the configuration. It shows many applications such as data buffering, data synchronization, optical switch, optical memory and optical signal processing [3–5

3. D. Dahan and G. Eisenstien, “Tunable all optical delay via slow and fast light propagation in a Raman assisted fiber optical parametric amplifier: a route to all optical buffering,” Opt. Express 13, 6234–6248 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

The basic principle of SBS slow light in an optical fiber can be depicted as follows: Two light beams are simultaneously injected into a single mode fiber (SMF) from its two ends. One beam is a strong continuous-wave (cw) laser acting as the pump light and the other one is a weak pulse laser acting as the signal pulse. Because of the electrostriction effect the two beams give rise to a density fluctuation in the fiber, generating an index grating or an acoustic wave which travels in the same direction with the pump beam. The frequency of the acoustic wave field is equal to the frequency difference between the pump beam and the signal beam. The pump beam produces strong backward scattering because of the moving index grating, which down shifts the pump frequency to the same level of the signal and simultaneously produces phonons. As a result both the signal pulse and the acoustic field are constructively enhanced. The strongest SBS occurs when the frequency shift equals to the inherent Brillion frequency shift ΩB (decided by the electrostriction response characteristic of the fiber material). Around this resonance and in a normal dispersion fiber the index of refraction changes rapidly with frequency, inevitably leading to the increase of the group index and thus the decrease of the group velocity of the signal pulse. This is the so called SBS slow light.

However, the inherent SBS bandwidth of SMF is only tens of MHz (defined by the inverse phonon lifetime in silica fiber which is in the 10-ns range). This narrow gain bandwidth causes the amplification of only a small portion of the pulse spectrum near the Brillouin resonance and inevitably yields pulse broadening while propagating along the fiber [6

6. M. G. Herráez, K. Y. Song, and L. Thévenaz, “Arbitrary-bandwidth Brillouin slow light in optical fibers,” Opt. Express 14, 1395–1400 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. But in practical applications, it is more important to achieve slow light for short pulses of sub-nanosecond durations corresponding to Gbits/sec data streams with little broadening. To overcome this obstacle, many ways of broadening the gain spectrum have been proposed. This includes overlapping the multi-line frequencies of a single pump laser [7

7. K. Y. Song, M. G. Herráez, and L. Thévenaz, “Gain-assisted pulse advancement using single and double Brillouin gain peaks in optical fibers,” Opt. Express 13, 9758–9765 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 8

8. M. D. Stenner, M. A. Neifeld, Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, and D. J. Gauthier, “Distortion management in slow-light pulse delay,” Opt. Express 13, 9995–10002 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and modulating the pump laser by frequency- [6

6. M. G. Herráez, K. Y. Song, and L. Thévenaz, “Arbitrary-bandwidth Brillouin slow light in optical fibers,” Opt. Express 14, 1395–1400 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 9

9. Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, D. J. Gauthier, L. Zhang, and A. E. Willner, “12-GHz-bandwidth SBS slow light in optical fibers,” in Proc. of OFC 2006, paper PDP1 (2006).

], amplitude- [10–12

10. A. Minardo, R. Bernini, and L. Zeni, “Low distortion Brillouin slow light in optical fibers using AM modulation,” Opt. Express 14, 5866–5876 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and phase-modulation [13

13. V. P. Kalosha, L. Chen, and X. Bao, “Slow and fast light via SBS in optical fibers for short pulses and broadband pump,” Opt. Express 14, 12693–12703 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 14

14. A. Zadok, A. Eyal, and M. Tur, “Extended delay of broadband signals in stimulated Brillouin scattering slow light using synthesized pump chirp,” Opt. Express 14, 8498–8505 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. All of these methods have only solved the problem to some extent. Even using the broadband pump scheme [15

15. Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, D. J. Gauthier, L. Zhang, and A. E. Willner, “Broadband SBS slow light in an optical fiber,” J. Lightwave Technol. 25, 201–206 (2007). [CrossRef]

, 16

16. K. Y. Song and K. Hotate, “25GHz bandwidth Brillouin slow light in optical fibers,” Opt. Lett. 32, 217–219 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], large pulse broadening still exists.

The spectral configuration of our double broadband pump scheme is shown in Fig. 1. The frequency separation between the central frequency of pump1 (ωp01) and that of pump2 (ωp02) is 2ΩB. Therefore, the Stocks gain spectrum of pump1 has the same central frequency with the anti-Stocks loss spectrum of pump2, denoted by ω0p01Bp02B. We can see that a wide gain spectrum with a flat-top is produced by overlapping gain1 and loss2. Suppose a signal pulse with a carrier frequency at ω0 oppositely launches the fiber, it will experience the slow-light propagation. In what follows we will theoretically analyze the characteristics of the time delay and the broadening of the signal pulse using such a pump scheme we proposed.

Fig. 1. Spectral configuration of double broadband pump beams and the corresponding Brillouin gain as well as loss spectra of them. The total gain profile is constructed by overlapping the Stokes gain spectrum (gain1) of pump1 and the anti-Stokes loss one (loss2) of pump2, where the gain1 and the power spectrum of pump1 are normalized to unity, respectively. Here Δωp2=Δωp1/(2)1/3, Ip1/Ip2=2 and Δωp1=0.5ΩB.

2. Theory

The SBS gain is given by the convolution of the intrinsic SBS gain spectrum g0(ω) with the power spectrum of the tailored pump beam Ip(ω), as given by [15

15. Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, D. J. Gauthier, L. Zhang, and A. E. Willner, “Broadband SBS slow light in an optical fiber,” J. Lightwave Technol. 25, 201–206 (2007). [CrossRef]

]

g(ω)=g0(ω)Ip(ω)=+g0(ωωp)Ip(ωp)dωp,
(1)

where

g0(ωωp)=±gB[iγ(ωωp±ΩB)+iγ],
(2)

and

Ip(ωp)=Ip1πΔωp1exp[(ωpωp01Δωp1)2]+Ip2πΔωp2exp[(ωpωp02Δωp2)2],
(3)

where gB is the intrinsic Brillouin gain coefficient, γ is the half width at half maximum of inherent Brillouin gain spectrum, +/- correspond to the Stokes gain and the anti-Stokes loss, respectively; Δωp1 (Δωp2) and Ip1 (Ip2) are the 1/e half width and the intensity of pump1 (pump2), respectively.

Inserting Eqs. (2) and (3) into Eq. (1) and assuming the conditions that γ≪Δωp1 and γ≪Δωp2 (they are satisfied in our case), one can approximate g(ω) to

g(ω)=gBπγ[Ip1Δωp1eξ12erfc(iξ1)Ip2Δωp2eξ22erfc(iξ2)],
(4)

where ξ1=(ω-ω0)/Δωp1 and ξ2=(ω-ω0)/Δωp2, erfc is the complementary error function. The real part of g(ω) leads to an amplification of the counter propagating signal pulse, whereas the imaginary part results in an accompanied phase shift of it. They can be expressed from Eq. (4) as follows:

Re[g(ω)]=gBπγ[Ip1Δωp1eξ12Ip2Δωp2eξ22],
(5)
Im[g(ω)]=2gBγ[Ip1Δωp1eξ120ξ1et2dtIp2Δωp2eξ220ξ2et2dt].
(6)

ΔTd(ω)=dIm[g(ω)z2]dωω
=gBzγ[Ip1Δωp12(12ξ1eξ120ξ1et2dt)Ip2Δωp22(12ξ2eξ220ξ2et2dt)],
(7)

where z is the fiber length.

As can be seen from Eq. (5) a flat-top gain can be obtained when d2Re[g(ω)]/d2ω=0 at the central frequency ω0. This condition is equivalent to Ip1/Ip2=Δωp1 3/Δωp2 3. Let us denote it as Ip1/Ip2=Δωp1 3/Δωp2 3=b for convenience. With this condition, at the resonance frequency ω0 thus ξ12=0, Eq. (7) can be reduced to the following simple form:

ΔTd(ω0)=gBzγ[Ip1Δωp12Ip2Δωp22]=gBzγIp1Δωp12(11b3).
(8)

Equation (8) indicates that slow light (ΔTd0)>0) can only be produced when b>1. Equivalently, the intensity and the spectral width of pump1 should be larger than that of pump2, i.e., Ip1>Ip2 and Δωp1>Δωp2.

Moreover, as shown in Fig. 1 the net gain spectrum is the superposition of a positive Gaussian-shaped gain spectrum (gain1) with a negative Gaussian-shaped loss one (loss2). Mathematically, the segment between the two peaks of the first derivative of a Gaussian function can be approximated to a straight line. And taking into account the condition of Δωp1>Δωp2 we select the frequency separation between two peaks of the first derivative of loss2 as the flat-top width of the net gain spectrum, denoted by Wflat-top and it is easy to get:

Wflattop=2Δωp2=2Δωp1b3.
(9)

In this paper we assume a Gaussian-shaped signal pulse having the carrier frequency of ω0 experiences slow-light propagation in the fiber. And we select the 1/e half bandwidth of the pulse (denoted by 1/δin, where δin being the 1/e half duration) to be the half of Wflat-top, ensuring that the entire spectrum of the signal pulse may fit within the frequency range between ω0-Wflat-top/2 and ω0+Wflat-top/2. In this case, we have

1δin=Wflattop2=2Δωp22=2Δωp12b3.
(10)

Note from Eq. (10) that Wflat-top determines the maximum spectral width (or the minimum temporal width δin) of the signal pulse. It is easy to see from Eq. (8) that the time delay ΔTd0) increases with b, while from Eq. (9) that the width of flat-top Wflat-top decreases with b. These relationships are shown in Fig. 2. With a trade-off between ΔTd0) and Wflat-top, throughout the paper we select b=2 as an example for simulations. Such a selection does not lose the generality of the method we proposed here. In Sec. 3 we will investigate the dependences of the time delay and the temporal broadening of signal pulse on SBS gain profile.

Fig. 2. Dependences of the time delay and the width of the flat-top on parameter b. Here Δωp1=0.5ωB, Pp1=0.2 W and Ip1/Ip2=Δωp1 3/Δωp2 3=b.

3. Results and discussion

Let us introduce the parameters we used for our simulations. These parameters are selected either corresponding to the properties of the common single-mode fiber SMF-28 at 1550 nm or according to the possible experimental conditions in practice: γ/(2π)=20 MHz, gB=5×10-11 m/W, ΩB/(2π)=10.8 GHz and the effective mode area Aeff=50 µm2; We set Δωp1 to its maximum, i.e., Δωp1=0.5ΩB, for obtaining a complete separation between gain1 and loss1 (as shown in Fig. 1); We set the fiber length at z=3.5 km and the laser power of pump1 (Pp1) at 0.2 W, note that Ip1 depends on Pp1 and Aeff through Ip1=Pp1/Aeff. Taking into account of Δωp1=0.5ΩB and b=2 we get δin=52 ps from Eq. (10). In what follows we will use these parameters unless otherwise is stated.

To construct different gain profiles, in this paper we fix Ip1 (by fixing Pp1 at 0.2 W) and change Ip2 and let Ip1/Ip2=a for the convenience. Note that from now on b=2 is always kept but it just means Δωp2=Δωp1/(2)1/3. The dependences of Brillouin gain and time delay on the parameter a, as respectively described by Eqs. (5) and (7), are firstly investigated. Figure 3(a) shows the spectral dependence of Brillouin gain exponent for different a. Three typical gain profiles are obtained. We can see that a flat-top is indeed produced, as analyzed in Sec. 2, when a=2; a dip around the central frequency ω0 is produced when a<2; and the normal case where gain is maximum at ω0 is yielded when a>2. Figure 3(b) shows the spectral dependence of time delay for different a. We can clearly see that at the flat-top gain situation (a=2) the time delay does not show a flat-top; while a flat-top delay is obtained around ω0 when a=2.5. At the wings, the time delay becomes negative which means the signal would experience superluminal process.

Fig. 3. Spectral dependences of (a) the gain exponent and (b) the time delay for different values of a. Here Δωp1=0.5ΩB, Pp1=0.2 W and Δωp2=Δωp1/(2)1/3.

According to the above parameters, we simulate the dependence of pulse broadening on the parameter a, as shown in Fig. 4. It is seen from Fig. 4 that although both Bgain and BGVD increase with the increase of a, they imply different meanings. Bgain is always positive, meaning that the front edge of the signal pulse always keeps in the front during the process of gain-dependent broadening. Note that Bgain<1 means the pulse is compressed and Bgain>1 means the pulse is broadened; while BGVD could be negative, this means the front edge of the signal pulse could fall behind of the back edge of it. Examining the total broadening curve we find that there exists a special point at a=2.073 where we get B=1. At this special point, a little positive Bgain (thus a slight pulse broadening) is compensated by the low negative BGVD (thus a slight pulse compression), leading to zero-broadening of the signal pulse.

Fig. 4. Dependences of Bgain, BGVD and B on parameter a. Here Δωp1=0.5ωB, Pp1=0.2 W and Δωp2=Δωp1/(2)1/3.

Furthermore, Eqs. (5) through (7) intuitively tell us that the pulse broadening may be dependent on Δωp1 and Ip1, i.e., the spectral width and the intensity of pump1. Therefore, it is significant for us to investigate the dependences of a (for B=1) on Δωp1 and Ip1 (or the laser power of pump1, i.e., Pp1). Figure 6(a) shows the dependence of a on Δωp1 where Pp1 is fixed at 0.2 W. We can see that although a decreases with Δωp1, the variation of a is very inappreciable even in a large range of Δωp1. The insert of Fig. 6(a) shows the allowable signal pulse-width δin under different Δωp1 as determined by Eq. (10) where b=2. Given a certain signal pulse to experience slow propagation we can decide Δωp1 according to the pulse’s width δin, then from Fig. 6(a) there exists an optimal a for obtaining B=1. Figure 6(b) indicates the dependence of a on Pp1 where Δωp1 is fixed at 0.5ΩB. It is seen that a increases slightly with Pp1. Both Figs. 6(a) and 6(b) denote that a can be regarded as nearly independent of the spectral width and the power of pump1 (Δωp1 and Pp1). This insensitive characteristic of a (nearly constant) for B=1 is owing to the specific gain profile we constructed. A signal pulse will experience group delay without broadening (related to SBS process) regardless of the pump power and the propagation distance.

Fig. 5. Spectral dependences of Brillouin gain and signal pulse intensity when a=2.073 for B=1. (a) Real and imaginary parts of gain; (b) Intensities of input and output pulses as well as the exponential gain. The 1/e full bandwidths for both the input and output pulses are shown in Fig. 5(b). Here Δωp1=0.5ΩB, Pp1=0.2 W and Δωp2=Δωp1/(2)1/3.
Fig. 6. Dependences of a for B=1 on the spectral width (Δωp1) and the laser power (Pp1) of pump1 in our double pump scheme. (a) on Δωp1, where Pp1 is fixed at 0.2 W; and (b) on Pp1, where Δωp1 is fixed at 0.5ωB. The insert of Fig. 6(a) shows the allowable signal pulse-width δin calculated by Eq. (10) for different Δωp1. Here Δωp2=Δωp1/(2)1/3.

Finally, we will study the dependences of time delay and pulse broadening of signal pulse on the laser power of pump1, Pp1, in the double broadband pump scheme (pump1 and pump2). Here we select a=2.085 as an example, which is a mediate value of a when Pp1 is between 0 and 1 W (as shown in Fig. 6(b)). Figure 7 shows these relationships under the condition of B≤2. The results of using a single broadband pump beam (only pump1) are also shown for comparison. We can see from Fig. 7(a) that for both cases the time delays increase linearly with the increase of Pp1, indicating the tunable time delay of slow light, but the time delay for double pump case is smaller as compared with that for single pump case under the same pump power. Meanwhile, this reduction of time delay can be compensated by increasing the pump power, the fiber length and/or using highly nonlinear optical fibers. Figure 7(b) shows the variations of pulse broadening with Pp1. It is seen that Bgain, BGVD and B monotonously increase with the increase of Pp1 for the single pump case, leading to a large broadening of signal pulse. On the contrary, for the double pump case the broadening factor B is nearly independent of the pump power, keeping almost unity in the process of Brillouin scattering. This is owing to the compensation between the positive gain-dependent broadening Bgain and the negative GVD-dependent broadening BGVD. Essentially, this property is attributed to the specific gain profile we designedly constructed.

Fig. 7. Dependences of the time delay and the pulse broadening on the laser power of pump1 under both the single pump scheme and the double pump scheme we proposed. (a) for time delay and (b) for pulse broadening factors Bgain, BGVD and B. Here δin=52 ps, a=2.085, Δωp1=0.5ΩB and Δωp2=Δωp1/(2)1/3.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion we have proposed a new SBS gain spectrum tailoring method for slow light propagation in a single mode optical fiber using two broadband pump beams with different powers and spectral widths. Theoretical analyses are given to discuss the characteristics of Brillouin gain and pulse broadening by use of this method. The dependence of pulse broadening on the SBS gain profile is investigated for the first time to our knowledge. It is shown that varying gain profiles can be obtained, including the narrow arched, the flat-top, the slight center-dipped and the bimodal ones, provided that the intensity and spectral width proportions of the two pump beams are properly chosen. Among them there exists a specific gain profile, i.e., the narrow arched gain profile, which will result in an approximate zero-broadening of signal pulse. This is owing to the compensation between the positive gain-dependent broadening and the negative GVD-dependent broadening. Before ending this paper, we also point out that the law we got in this paper is also applicable for the linear propagation of arbitrarily shaped light pulses. This is because that through a resonant amplifying medium the pulse can acquire a nearly Gaussian shape, regardless of its initial temporal shape and spectral profile. And the incident pulses having different shapes but the same area and the same width can be reshaped in the medium to give approximately the same Gaussian-shaped pulse, as reported in Ref. [20

20. B. Macke and B. Ségard, “Pulse normalization in slow-light media,” Phys. Rev. A 73, Art. No. 043802 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. This zero-broadening property we presented in this paper is very significant for slow light propagation, especially in the high-speed short-pulse systems. It indicates that we can control the pulse broadening of SBS slow light not only by just increasing the bandwidth of SBS gain spectrum, but also by artificially constructing and optimizing the profile of it.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant No. 60778020) and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

References and links

1.

K. Y. Song, M. G. Herráez, and L. Thévenaz, “Observation of pulse delaying and advancement in optical fibers using stimulated Brillouin scattering,” Opt. Express 13, 82–88 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

Y. Okawachi, M. S. Bigelow, J. E. Sharping, Z. M. Zhu, A. Schweinsberg, D. J. Gauthier, R. W. Boyd, and A. L. Gaeta, “Tunable all-optical delays via Brillouin slow light in an optical fiber,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, Art. No. 153902 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

D. Dahan and G. Eisenstien, “Tunable all optical delay via slow and fast light propagation in a Raman assisted fiber optical parametric amplifier: a route to all optical buffering,” Opt. Express 13, 6234–6248 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

D. J. Gauthier, “Slow light brings faster communications,” Phys. World 18, 30–32 (2005).

5.

M. G. Herráez, K. Y. Song, and L. Thévenaz, “Optically controlled slow and fast light in optical fibers using stimulated Brillouin scattering,” Appl. Phys. Lett.87, Art. No. 081113 (2005).

6.

M. G. Herráez, K. Y. Song, and L. Thévenaz, “Arbitrary-bandwidth Brillouin slow light in optical fibers,” Opt. Express 14, 1395–1400 (2006). [CrossRef]

7.

K. Y. Song, M. G. Herráez, and L. Thévenaz, “Gain-assisted pulse advancement using single and double Brillouin gain peaks in optical fibers,” Opt. Express 13, 9758–9765 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

M. D. Stenner, M. A. Neifeld, Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, and D. J. Gauthier, “Distortion management in slow-light pulse delay,” Opt. Express 13, 9995–10002 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, D. J. Gauthier, L. Zhang, and A. E. Willner, “12-GHz-bandwidth SBS slow light in optical fibers,” in Proc. of OFC 2006, paper PDP1 (2006).

10.

A. Minardo, R. Bernini, and L. Zeni, “Low distortion Brillouin slow light in optical fibers using AM modulation,” Opt. Express 14, 5866–5876 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

E. Shumakher, N. Orbach, A. Nevet, D. Dahan, and G. Eisenstein, “On the balance between delay, bandwidth and signal distortion in slow light systems based on stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers,” Opt. Express 14, 5877–5884 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

L. Y. Ren and Y. Tomita, “Reducing group-velocity-dispersion-dependent broadening of stimulated Brillouin scattering slow light in an optical fiber by use of a single pump laser,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25, 741–746 (2008). [CrossRef]

13.

V. P. Kalosha, L. Chen, and X. Bao, “Slow and fast light via SBS in optical fibers for short pulses and broadband pump,” Opt. Express 14, 12693–12703 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

A. Zadok, A. Eyal, and M. Tur, “Extended delay of broadband signals in stimulated Brillouin scattering slow light using synthesized pump chirp,” Opt. Express 14, 8498–8505 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, D. J. Gauthier, L. Zhang, and A. E. Willner, “Broadband SBS slow light in an optical fiber,” J. Lightwave Technol. 25, 201–206 (2007). [CrossRef]

16.

K. Y. Song and K. Hotate, “25GHz bandwidth Brillouin slow light in optical fibers,” Opt. Lett. 32, 217–219 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

T. Schneider, M. Junker, and K. U. Lauterbach, “Potential ultra wide slow-light bandwidth enhancement,” Opt. Express 14, 11082–11087 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

T. Schneider, R. Henker, K. U. Lauterbach, and M. Junker, “Comparison of delay enhancement mechanisms for SBS-based slow light systems,” Opt. Express 15, 9606–9613 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

R. M. Camacho, M. V. Pack, and J. C. Howell, “Low-distortion slow light using two absorption resonances,” Phys. Rev. A 73, Art. No. 063812 (2006). [CrossRef]

20.

B. Macke and B. Ségard, “Pulse normalization in slow-light media,” Phys. Rev. A 73, Art. No. 043802 (2006). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(060.2310) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber optics
(060.4370) Fiber optics and optical communications : Nonlinear optics, fibers
(060.5530) Fiber optics and optical communications : Pulse propagation and temporal solitons
(290.5900) Scattering : Scattering, stimulated Brillouin

ToC Category:
Fiber Optics and Optical Communications

History
Original Manuscript: February 7, 2008
Revised Manuscript: March 24, 2008
Manuscript Accepted: April 7, 2008
Published: May 20, 2008

Citation
Shihe Wang, Liyong Ren, Yu Liu, and Yasuo Tomita, "Zero-broadening SBS slow light propagation in an optical fiber using two broadband pump beams," Opt. Express 16, 8067-8076 (2008)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-11-8067


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References

  1. K. Y. Song, M. G. Herráez, and L. Thévenaz, "Observation of pulse delaying and advancement in optical fibers using stimulated Brillouin scattering," Opt. Express 13, 82-88 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. Y. Okawachi, M. S. Bigelow, J. E. Sharping, Z. M. Zhu, A. Schweinsberg, D. J. Gauthier, R. W. Boyd, and A. L. Gaeta, "Tunable all-optical delays via Brillouin slow light in an optical fiber," Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, Art. No. 153902 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. D. Dahan and G. Eisenstien, "Tunable all optical delay via slow and fast light propagation in a Raman assisted fiber optical parametric amplifier: a route to all optical buffering," Opt. Express 13, 6234-6248 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. D. J. Gauthier, "Slow light brings faster communications," Phys. World 18, 30-32 (2005).
  5. M. G. Herráez, K. Y. Song, and L. Thévenaz, "Optically controlled slow and fast light in optical fibers using stimulated Brillouin scattering," Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, Art. No. 081113 (2005).
  6. M. G. Herráez, K. Y. Song, and L. Thévenaz, "Arbitrary-bandwidth Brillouin slow light in optical fibers," Opt. Express 14, 1395-1400 (2006). [CrossRef]
  7. K. Y. Song, M. G. Herráez, and L. Thévenaz, "Gain-assisted pulse advancement using single and double Brillouin gain peaks in optical fibers," Opt. Express 13, 9758-9765 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. M. D. Stenner, M. A. Neifeld, Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, and D. J. Gauthier, "Distortion management in slow-light pulse delay," Opt. Express 13, 9995-10002 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. Z. M. Zhu, A. M. C. Dawes, D. J. Gauthier, L. Zhang, and A. E. Willner, "12-GHz-bandwidth SBS slow light in optical fibers," in Proc. of OFC 2006, paper PDP1 (2006).
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