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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 16, Iss. 17 — Aug. 18, 2008
  • pp: 13276–13286
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Optically compensated circular polarizers for liquid crystal displays

Chi-Huang Lin  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 16, Issue 17, pp. 13276-13286 (2008)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.16.013276


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Abstract

An optical compensation principle of the crossed circular polarizers is developed to widen the viewing angle of high-transmittance multi-domain vertical-alignment liquid crystal displays (MVA-LCDs). The optical properties of a biaxial film are analyzed by the Berreman 4×4 matrix method, and the analytical solution for the slow-axis orientation of a biaxial film is calculated to obtain the compensation principle of the crossed circular polarizers. Based on this compensation principle, the high-transmittance MVA-LCD theoretically has a complete 80° viewing cone for contrast ratio (CR)>100:1 and experimental results reveal that the compensated high-transmittance MVA-LCD can achieve a viewing angle of over the entire 80° viewing cone for CR>20:1. Practical application as a mobile display is emphasized.

© 2008 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

This study proposes a compensation principle for the crossed circular polarizers to widen the viewing angle of the high-transmittance MVA-LCD. The proposed compensation principle can be utilized to obtain practical compensation methods for the high-transmittance MVA-LCD. We begin with analyzing the optical properties of a biaxial film by using the Berreman 4×4 matrix method [6

6. D. W. Berreman, “Optics in stratified and anisotropic media: 4×4-matrix formulation,” J. Opt. Soc. Am.62, 502–510 (1972). D. W. Berreman, “Optics in smoothly varying anisotropic planar structures: Application to liquid crystal twist cells,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 63, 1374–1380 (1973). [CrossRef]

], and then deriving and analyzing the analytical solution for the slow-axis orientation of a biaxial film, and minimizing the light leakage of the crossed circular polarizers. Finally, the compensation principle of the crossed circular polarizers is developed to widen the viewing angle of the high-transmittance MVA-LCD. Based on the proposed principle, the high-transmittance MVA-LCD is predicted to have a complete 80o viewing cone for CR>100:1. The experimental results demonstrate that the compensated high-transmittance MVA-LCD can achieve a wide viewing angle over the 80o viewing cone for CR>20:1.

2. Design of wide view circular polarizers for liquid crystal displays

Fig. 1. Basic cell configuration of compensated high-transmittance MVA-LCD.

In Fig. 1, the crossed biaxial λ/4 plates are used to prevent the leakage of light from the crossed λ/4 plates that is caused by the shift in the azimuthal angle of the slow axes of crossed λ/4 plates for off-axis light. To investigate the slow-axis orientation of the biaxial λ/4 plates, we first analyze the optical properties of optical films. For an anisotropic medium such as an optical film, the optical properties can be calculated by the Berreman 4×4 matrix method [6–8

6. D. W. Berreman, “Optics in stratified and anisotropic media: 4×4-matrix formulation,” J. Opt. Soc. Am.62, 502–510 (1972). D. W. Berreman, “Optics in smoothly varying anisotropic planar structures: Application to liquid crystal twist cells,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 63, 1374–1380 (1973). [CrossRef]

]. The Berreman 4×4 matrix method which takes the reflected light from boundary into account is superior to the 2×2 matrix method [9

9. A. Lien, “Extended Jones matrix representation for the twisted nematic liquid-crystal display at oblique incidence,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 572767–2769 (1990). [CrossRef]

, 10

10. P. Yeh, “Extended Jones matrix method,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 72, 507–513 (1982). [CrossRef]

]. For a plane monochromatic wave inside the anisotropic medium, the Maxwell equation can be transformed into the Berreman equation which is given as [6

6. D. W. Berreman, “Optics in stratified and anisotropic media: 4×4-matrix formulation,” J. Opt. Soc. Am.62, 502–510 (1972). D. W. Berreman, “Optics in smoothly varying anisotropic planar structures: Application to liquid crystal twist cells,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 63, 1374–1380 (1973). [CrossRef]

]

dψdz=ikD(z)ψ
(1)

where ψ=(Ex, Hy, Ey, -Hx)T, k=ω/c and D(z) is the Berreman matrix. For a nonmagnetic medium with nontilted principal axes, the Berreman matrix D(z) is given by

D(z)=(0D1200D210D230000100D430)
(2)

with

D12=1(χn3)2,
D21=n12cos2ϕ+n22sin2ϕ,
D23=(n12n22)sinϕcosϕ,
D43=n12sin2ϕ+n22cos2ϕχ2.

where n1, n2 and n3 are the principal refractive indices for the principal axes of the anisotropic medium X, Y and Z, respectively, ϕ is the orientation angle of the principal axes with respect to laboratory coordinate system (x, y, z), and χ=sinθi where θi is the incidence angle. For homogeneous media, the matrix D does not depend on z and the solution of Eq. (1) can be written as

ψ(z)=j=14Cjexp(ikqjz)ψj
(3)

where qj and Ψj are the eigenvalues and the eigenstates of the Berreman equation. By substituting Eq. (3) into (1), the Berreman equation leads to an eigenvalue equation for D which is written as

Dψj=qjψj.
(4)

Equation (4) implies that the eigenstates of the incident light inside the homogeneous media can be obtained by calculating the eigenstates of the Berreman matrix D. Since D is a 4×4 matrix, the characteristic equation of D is a quartic equation. By solving this quartic equation, the eigenvalue of the Berreman matrix D are

qe±=±12α+β,
(5)
qo±=±12αβ,
(6)

with

α=(n12+n22)χ2(n12cos2ϕ+n22sin2ϕ+n32)2n32,
β=(n12n22)2+χ4(n12cos2ϕ+n22sin2ϕn32)2n34
2χ2(n12n22)(n12cos2ϕn22sin2ϕn32cos2ϕ)n32.

For the Berreman matrix D, the expression of the eigenstates with eigenvalue can be written as [7

7. C. Oldano, “Electromagnetic-wave propagation in anisotropic stratified media,” Phys. Rev. A 40, 6014–6020 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]

ψj=Aj(D12D23D13(D22qj)D13D21D23(D11qj)(D11qj)(D22qj)D12D21qj[(D11qj)(D22qj)D12D21]),
(7)

where Aj is the normalization constant. By substituting Eqs. (2), (5) and (6) into Eq. (7), the eigenstates of the matrix D are written as

ψe±=(12sin2ϕ(n12n22)(1χ2n32)qe±cosϕsinϕ(n12n12)(qe±)2+(n12cos2ϕ+n212sin2ϕ)(χ2n32)n32(qe±)3+qe±(n12cos2ϕ+n22sin2ϕ)(χ2n32)n32),
(8)

and

ψo±=(12sin2ϕ(n12n22)(1χ2n32)qo±cosϕsinϕ(n12n22)(qo±)2+(n12cos2ϕ+n22sin2ϕ)(χ2n32)n32(qo±)3+qo±(n12cos2ϕ+n212sin2ϕ)(χ2n32)n32).
(9)

where ψ + e and ψ - e are the eigenstates of the forward propagating light and the backward propagating light, respectively, for the extraordinary ray and ψ + o and ψ- o are the eigenstates of the forward propagating light and the backward propagating light, respectively, for the ordinary ray. After normalization, we can see that the eigenstates of the backward propagating light and the forward propagating light, given in Eqs. (8) and (9), have the same component in the electric field and the magnetic field for both the extraordinary ray and ordinary ray. That is the backward propagating light (reflected light) and the forward propagating light (incident light) have the same eigenstates (with different eigenvalues) inside the medium with nontilted principal axes. Notably, the same eigenstates for the reflected light and the incident light is just a consequence of the medium with nontilted principal axes. In the general case, the relations of the eigenstates between the reflected light and the incident light are not so simple.

The above eigenstates, calculated from the Berreman 4×4 matrix method, are the tangential components of the electromagnetic field. Thus, the complete eigenstates of the propagating light inside the anisotropic medium such as an optical film cannot be obtained directly from Eqs.(8) and (9). Based on the above analysis, the reflected light and the incident light have the same eigenstates inside the medium with nontilted principal axes. Thus, the complete eigenstates of the anisotropic medium can be obtained by only considering the forward propagating light (incident light) in our study. The two allowed eigenstates of the anisotropic medium represent the slow axis and the fast axis of the anisotropic medium for the incident light [11

11. P. Yeh and C. Gu, Optis Of Liquid Crystal Displays (Wiley, New York, 1999).

]. For the incident light, the eigenstates of the anisotropic medium can be obtained by calculating the eigenstates of the impermeability tensor. In the principal coordinates, the impermeability tensor of a biaxial film η is given by

η=(1n120001n220001n32)
(10)

A coordinate transformation that causes the Z-axis to be the propagation direction of the light, yields a transformed impermeability tensor ηt, in the new coordinates, that can be simplified as a 2×2 tensor, which can be written as

ηt=(cos2θocos2ϕn12+cos2θosin2ϕn22+sin2θon32cosθocosϕsinϕn12+cosθocosϕsinϕn22cosθocosϕsinϕn12+cosθocosϕsinϕn22sin2ϕn12+cos2ϕn22)
(11)

where θo is the refraction angle of incident light inside the biaxial film, as shown in Fig. 2(a). Calculating the eigenstates of the transformed impermeability tensor ηt yields the analytical solution for the slow-axis orientation of a biaxial film for off-axis light. To eliminate efficiently the off-axis light leakage of the crossed λ/4 plates, we first investigate the orientation of the slow axis of a biaxial film at ϕ=45°, which is the direction of the maximum shift angle of the slow axis of a biaxial film for off-axis light from our calculations (not shown here). For off-axis light, the analytical solution for the slow-axis orientation of a biaxial film at ϕ=45° is derived as

ψ=tan1(ABC2D)
(12)

where A, B, C and D are as follows

A=2(n 2 1-n 2 2)n 2 3cosθo

B=2n 2 1 n 2 2sin2 θo-sin2 θo(n 2 3 n 2 2+n 2 1 n 2 3)

C=2n 2 2 n 2 1sin2 θo+(cos2 θo+1)(n 2 3 n 2 1+n 2 3 n 2 2)

D=8n 2 1 n 2 2 n 2 3(n 2 1sin2 θo+n 2 2sin2θo+2n 2 3cos2 θo)

Notably, the ψ, given in Eq. (12), is defined as the included angle between the slow axis of the optical film and the plane of incidence. For a C plate, its two in-plane refractive indices are equal, i.e., n1=n2. By substituting n1=n2 into Eq. (12), the ψ is zero regardless of the refraction angle. This is because the slow axis of the C plate, which is a plate of uniaxially birefringent medium with its optic axis normal to the plate surfaces [11

11. P. Yeh and C. Gu, Optis Of Liquid Crystal Displays (Wiley, New York, 1999).

], is always parallel to the plane of incidence regardless of the incident angle. A cell of LC with a vertical alignment is a good example of the C plate. Additionally, the slow-axis orientation ψ of the biaxial film affects the final polarization state of the incident light. The basic concept of the optical compensation for LCDs is to keep the polarization state of the off-axis incident light to be the same as that of the normal incident light in the dark state of LCDs by designing the proper ψ and the phase retardation of the biaxial film [11–13

11. P. Yeh and C. Gu, Optis Of Liquid Crystal Displays (Wiley, New York, 1999).

].

For the optical compensation of a LCD, the biaxial factor Nz is used to characterize the optical properties of the biaxial film [14

14. Y. Fujimura, T. Nagatsuka, H. Yoshimi, and T. Shimomura, “Optical properties of retardation films for STN-LCDs,” SID Int. Symp. Digest Tech. Papers , 22, 739–742 (1991).

]. Considering both the difference and ratio of n1, n2 and n3, yields a modified biaxial factor as

Nz=n2(n1n3)n3(n1n2)withn1>n2
(13)

Based on Eqs. (3) and (4), the slow-axis shift angle of the biaxial film Δψ, shown in Fig. 2(a), which is defined as Δψ=ψ(θo)-ψ(θo=0°), is calculated with different Nz for off-axis light at ϕ=45°, as shown in Fig. 2(b). From Fig. 2(b), Δψ is a negative value for the compensation film with Nz>0.5 and a positive value for the compensation film with Nz<0.5, indicating that the slow axis shifts toward the normal to the incident plane when the compensation film has Nz>0.5 and toward a direction parallel to the incident plane when the compensation film has Nz<0.5 for off-axis light. Furthermore, the compensation film with Nz=0.5 has a nearly constant slow-axis orientation, Δψ~0, and the Δψ curves for different Nz, plotted in Fig. 2(b), exhibit almost mirror symmetry with respect to the curve of Nz=0.5, such that the Δψ curves for Nz>0.5 and Nz<0.5 have the same magnitude but different signs. The same tendency of the slow axis to shift is obtained at ϕ=-45°.

Fig. 2. (a) Principal coordinate system of biaxial film (X,Y,Z) and wavevector k⃑ coordinate system (x’,y’,z’). D 1, D 2 and Δψ are two eigenstates and the slow-axis shift angle of the biaxial film, respectively, for incident light. (b) Curves of slow-axis shift angle Δψ of biaxial films with different Nz for off-axis light at viewing direction ϕ=45°. Refractive indices of biaxial films, n1 and n2, in the range 1.5~1.65 and n1-n2>0.001 are used for the calculation. Error bars represent the range for the calculation results of Δψ.

Based on the above analysis for the slow-axis orientation of the biaxial film, the compensation principles for the crossed λ/4 plates and the crossed linear polarizers are developed to eliminate the off-axis light leakage of crossed circular polarizers. For the crossed λ/4 plates, the off-axis light leakage can be significantly reduced under the condition Nz_λ/4+Nz’_λ/4=1, where Nz_λ/4 and Nz’_λ/4 are the Nz values of the top and bottom λ/4 plates, respectively. Figure 3(a) explains this proposed compensation principle for the crossed λ/4 plates. Figure 3(a) is the orientation of the two slow axes of the crossed λ/4 plates at ϕ=45° and ϕ=-45° using a Poincaré sphere representation. Based on the above analysis, the slow axis of the λ/4 plate with its orientation at ϕ=45° shifts from A to C for Nz>0.5 (A to E for Nz<0.5) as the incident angle increases, while the slow axis of the other λ/4 plate at ϕ=-45° shifts from B to F for Nz<0.5 (B to D for Nz>0.5) as shown in Fig. 3(a). Accordingly, the two slow axes of the crossed λ/4 plates shift in the same direction on the equator of the Poincaré sphere for off-axis light when one λ/4 plate with Nz>0.5 and one λ/4 plate with Nz<0.5 are used. Moreover, the mirror symmetry of Δψ curves with respect to the curve of Nz=0.5 in Fig. 2(b) is such that, while Nz_λ/4+Nz’_λ/4=1 is satisfied, the shift angles Δψ1 and Δψ2 (Δψ1’ and Δψ2’), shown in Fig. 3(a), are almost equal, indicating that the slow axes of the crossed λ/4 plates, which are satisfied with Nz_λ/4+Nz’_λ/4=1 remain crossed for off-axis light, and then the off-axis light leakage, which is caused by the crossed λ/4 plates, is eliminated. Additionally, when both of the λ/4 plates with Nz=0.5 are used, the orientation of the two slow-axes of the crossed λ/4 plates remain at A and B, shown in Fig. 3(a), for off-axis light, indicating that the slow axes of the crossed λ/4 plates also remain crossed for off-axis light when both of the λ/4 plates with Nz=0.5 are used. Figure 3(b) plots the calculations of the included angle of the slow axes of the crossed λ/4 plates based on the proposed principle for off-axis light. Figure 3(b) reveals that the maximum deviation of the included angle of the slow axes of the crossed λ/4 plates with various combinations of Nz, as determined by the proposed principle, is less than 2° at θo=70°, which angle represents a significant improvement over that, ~52°, of conventional crossed λ/4 plates.

Fig. 3. (a) Poincaré sphere representation (as seen from north pole) of orientation of slow axes of crossed λ/4 plates at ϕ=45° and ϕ=-45°. (b) Calculations of the included angle of slow axes of crossed λ/4 plates based on proposed principle for off-axis light. Refractive indices of biaxial films, n1 and n2, in the range 1.5~1.65 and n1-n2>0.001 are used for the calculation. Error bars represent the range for the calculation results of the included angle of the crossed λ/4 plates.

A biaxial λ/2 plate with a biaxial factor Nz_λ/2=0.5 is used to eliminate the off-axis light leakage by crossed linear polarizers. The compensation mechanism of the biaxial λ/2 plate with Nz_λ/2=0.5 for the off-axis light leakage of the crossed linear polarizers comes from the fact that the biaxial film of Nz=0.5 has a nearly unchanged slow-axis orientation for off-axis light [13

13. Y. Saitoh, S. Kimura, K. Kusafuka, and H. Shimizu, “Optimum film compensation of viewing angle of contrast in in-plane-switching-mode liquid crystal display,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 37, 4822–4828 (1998). [CrossRef]

]. Figure 2(b) indicates that the maximum shift angle of the slow axis of the biaxial film with Nz_λ/2=0.5, defined by the proposed Eq. (4), is ~0.9° at θo=70°. This value is less than ~1.8°, which is the slow-axis shift of the biaxial film with Nz_λ/2=0.5 by the conventional definition Nz=(n1n3)(n1n2) with n 1>n 2). Accordingly, the off-axis light leakage of the crossed linear polarizers can be greatly reduced by compensation using a biaxial λ/2 plate with the proposed Nz_λ/2=0.5. Following the compensation for the crossed λ/4 plates and the crossed linear polarizers based on the proposed principle, Nz_λ/4+Nz’_λ/4=1 and Nz_λ/2=0.5, the off-axis light leakage of the crossed circular polarizers can be effectively eliminated, thus widening the viewing angle of the high-transmittance MVA-LCD.

3. Simulation and experimental results

Based on the proposed compensation principle, the following refractive indices and film thickness of the LC, the C plate, the biaxial λ/2 plate and the λ/4 plates are employed in the proposed structure to widen the viewing angle of the high-transmittance MVA-LCD; ne_LC=1.5897 and no_LC=1.4874 with dLC=4µm, ne_-c=1.5089 and no_-c=1.5124 with d-c=107.94µm, n1_λ/2=1.5095, n2_λ/2=1.5095 and n3_λ/2=1.5102 with dλ/2=184µm and n1_λ/4=1.5095, n2_λ/4=1.5011, n3_λ/4=1.5095~1.511 for Nz_λ/4=0~1, with dλ/4=92µm. The Berreman 4×4 matrix method is used for the calculation of the viewing angle. The calculations reveal that all of the iso-CR curves of the compensated high-transmittance MVALCD, based on the proposed compensation principle, are similar, and the viewing angle exceeds the entire 80° viewing cone for CR>100:1. Figures 4(a), (b) and (c) plot the calculations for the crossed circular polarizers with (Nz_λ/2, Nz_λ/4, Nz’_λ/4)=(0.5, 0, 1), (0.5, 0.3, 0.7), and (0.5, 0.5, 0.5), respectively.

Fig. 4. Viewing angle characteristic of simulated iso-CR curves of high-transmittance MVALCD for the crossed circular polarizers with (Nz_λ/2, Nz_λ/4, Nz’_λ/4)=(a) (0.5, 0, 1), (b) (0.5, 0.3, 0.7) and (c) (0.5, 0.5, 0.5), respectively. (d) Viewing angle characteristic of experimental iso-CR curves of high-transmittance MVA-LCD for the crossed circular polarizers with (Nz_λ/2, Nz_λ/4, Nz’_λ/4)=(0.5, 0.5, 0.5).

Presently, the compensation film with Nz=0.5 is used widely for the optical compensation of LCDs. Accordingly, in the experiment, the polarizer sample with (Nz_λ/2, Nz_λ/4, Nz’_λ/4)=(0.5, 0.5, 0.5) was prepared (Nitto Denko). The high-transmittance MVA-LCD cell with a cell gap of 4µm was filled with a commercial LC mixture, MJ-042783 (Merck), with Δn=0.1 at 550nm. The diameter and the height of the circular protrusion are 15µm and 1.5µm, respectively, the sub-pixel size is 47µm×141µm, and the gap between two adjacent pixel electrodes is 8µm. Figure 4 (d) plots measured iso-CR curves of the compensated high-transmittance MVA-LCD sample, indicating that the compensated high-transmittance MVALCD sample, based on the proposed principle, can achieve a viewing angle over the entire 80° viewing cone for CR>20:1. The experimental iso-CR curves, shown in Fig. 4(d), are lowered because the ideal parameters may not be precisely controlled. Furthermore, the variation in thickness of the compensation films and the LC alignment distortion near the spacers, the protrusions and the pixel edges also reduce the contrast ratio. In practice, a light-shielding metal layer that is formed during the thin film transistor array process can be designed under the pixel edges, the spacers, and the protrusions to prevent light leakage to improve the iso- CR curves.

Fig. 5. Maximum light leakage of the compensated crossed circular polarizers with (Nz_λ/2, Nz_λ/4, Nz’_λ/4)=(a) (0.5, 0, 1), (b) (0.5, 0.3, 0.7) and (c) (0.5, 0.5, 0.5), respectively, at different viewing angles as a function of wavelength.

For the applications of the LCD, wide spectral bandwidth is as important as wide viewing angle. Although, in the proposed cell configuration, shown in Fig. 1, only single λ/4 plate is used for each of the circular polarizer. However, the slow axes of the two λ/4 plates in the proposed structure are designed to be crossed which leads to the self-compensation effect at the normal viewing direction. Additionally, based on the proposed compensation principle, the slow axes of these two λ/4 plates remain crossed for off-axis light, this indicates that the self-compensation effect occurs over full viewing cone. Because of this self-compensation effect, the proposed compensation films tend to have a wide spectral bandwidth so that the light leakage of the crossed circular polarizers is less than 3.59×10-5 over the 450~650 nm spectral range at the normal viewing direction for different (Nz_λ/2, Nz_λ/4, Nz’_λ/4) designs, as shown in Fig. 5 (calculated by the 4×4 matrix method). The maximum light leakage is ~4×10-3 at λ=450 nm and ~1.47×10-3 at λ=650 nm at 80° viewing cone. This is sufficient for LCD applications because the human visual system is insensitive to blue, thus, the light leakage at blue is more acceptable than red and green. It should be noted that for some LCD applications such as transflective type LCDs, the color dispersion and the viewing angle in the reflective part cannot be compensated by using the proposed simple compensation method. This is because that the reflected light of the transflective type LCD only passes through the top circular polarizer and the self-compensation effect no more occurs under this condition. A more complicated configuration of the crossed circular polarizers is needed to widen the viewing angle and the spectral bandwidth of the transflective type LCDs. Further study on the broadband wide-view circular polarizers for the transflective type LCDs is now underway.

4. Conclusions

This study analyzes the optical properties of the biaxial film by using the Berreman 4×4 matrix method and obtains the analytical solution for the slow-axis orientation of the biaxial film to develop an optical compensation principle of crossed circular polarizers for widening the viewing angle of the high-transmittance MVA-LCD. Based on this principle, the high-transmittance MVA-LCD theoretically and experimentally has a complete 80° wide viewing cone. Because of the self-compensation effect, the light leakage of the proposed crossed circular polarizers is maintained below 4×10-3 over the 450~650 nm spectral range at 80° viewing cone. We believe the proposed principle of the crossed circular polarizers will be a powerful method not only in practical applications of high-transmittance MVA-LCD but also in devices with crossed circular polarizers.

Acknowledgment

The authors would like to thank the National Science Council of the Republic of China, Taiwan for financially supporting this research under Contract Nos. NSC 96-2112-M-110-014-MY2.

References and links

1.

H. Yoshida, Y. Tasaka, Y. Tanaka, H. Sukenori, Y. Koike, and K. Okamoto, “MVA LCD for Notebook or Mobile PCs with High Transmittance, High Contrast Ratio, and Wide Angle Viewing,” SID Int. Symp. Digest Tech. Papers 35, 6–9 (2004). [CrossRef]

2.

Q. Hong, T. X. Wu, R. Lu, and S. T. Wu, “Wide-view circular polarizer consisting of a linear polarizer and two biaxial films,” Opt. Express 13, 10777–10783 (200 5), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-13-26-10777. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

Q. Hong, T. X. Wu, X. Zhu, R. Lu, and S. T. Wu, “Designs of wide-view and broadband circular polarizers,” Opt. Express 13, 8318–8331 (2005), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-13-20-8318. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

Z. Ge, R. Lu, T. X. Wu, S. T. Wu, C. L. Lin, N. C. Hsu, W. Y. Li, and C. K. Wei, “Extraordinarily wide-view circular polarizers for liquid crystal displays,” Opt. Express 16, 3120–3129 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-5-3120. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

C. H. Lin, “Extraordinarily wide-view and high-transmittance vertically aligned liquid crystal displays,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 151112 (2007). [CrossRef]

6.

D. W. Berreman, “Optics in stratified and anisotropic media: 4×4-matrix formulation,” J. Opt. Soc. Am.62, 502–510 (1972). D. W. Berreman, “Optics in smoothly varying anisotropic planar structures: Application to liquid crystal twist cells,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 63, 1374–1380 (1973). [CrossRef]

7.

C. Oldano, “Electromagnetic-wave propagation in anisotropic stratified media,” Phys. Rev. A 40, 6014–6020 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

M. Schubert, “Polarization-independent optical parameters of arbitrarily anisotropic homogeneous layered systems,” Phys. Rev. B 53, 4265–4274 (1996). [CrossRef]

9.

A. Lien, “Extended Jones matrix representation for the twisted nematic liquid-crystal display at oblique incidence,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 572767–2769 (1990). [CrossRef]

10.

P. Yeh, “Extended Jones matrix method,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. 72, 507–513 (1982). [CrossRef]

11.

P. Yeh and C. Gu, Optis Of Liquid Crystal Displays (Wiley, New York, 1999).

12.

T. Ishinabe, T. Miyashita, T. Uchida, and Y. Fujimura, “A wide viewing angle polarizer and a quarter-wave plate with a wide wavelength range for extremely high quality LCDs,” Proc. of IDW’02 485–488 (2002).

13.

Y. Saitoh, S. Kimura, K. Kusafuka, and H. Shimizu, “Optimum film compensation of viewing angle of contrast in in-plane-switching-mode liquid crystal display,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 37, 4822–4828 (1998). [CrossRef]

14.

Y. Fujimura, T. Nagatsuka, H. Yoshimi, and T. Shimomura, “Optical properties of retardation films for STN-LCDs,” SID Int. Symp. Digest Tech. Papers , 22, 739–742 (1991).

OCIS Codes
(230.3720) Optical devices : Liquid-crystal devices
(260.5430) Physical optics : Polarization

ToC Category:
Optical Devices

History
Original Manuscript: June 23, 2008
Revised Manuscript: August 7, 2008
Manuscript Accepted: August 11, 2008
Published: August 13, 2008

Citation
Chi-Huang Lin, "Optically compensated circular polarizers for liquid crystal displays," Opt. Express 16, 13276-13286 (2008)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-17-13276


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References

  1. H. Yoshida, Y. Tasaka, Y. Tanaka, H. Sukenori, Y. Koike, and K. Okamoto, "MVA LCD for Notebook or Mobile PCs with High Transmittance, High Contrast Ratio, and Wide Angle Viewing," SID Int. Symp. Digest Tech. Papers 35, 6-9 (2004). [CrossRef]
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