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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 18 — Aug. 31, 2009
  • pp: 15571–15577
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Experimental investigation of radiation effect on erbium-ytterbium co-doped fiber amplifier for space optical communication in low-dose radiation environment

Jing Ma, Mi Li, Liying Tan, Yanping Zhou, Siyuan Yu, and Qiwen Ran  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 18, pp. 15571-15577 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.015571


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Abstract

High power erbium-ytterbium co-doped fiber amplifier (EYDFA) has been radiated to the dose of 50krad at the dose rate of 40rad/s. Some key parameters have been measured to investigate the radiation effect on the EYDFA for space optical communication. Considering the dose of 50krad is big enough to the most of low-dose radiation environment, these experimental results will be a good reference for the low-dose inter-satellite optical communication designers.

© 2009 OSA

1. Introduction

Fiber amplifiers are being widely deployed in terrestrial applications for long-line or highly distributed optical communications systems [1

1. Y. Mochida, N. Yamaguchi, and G. Ishikawa, “Technology-oriented review and vision of 40-Gb/s-based optical transport networks,” J. Lightwave Technol. 20(12), 2272–2281 (2002).

,2

2. M. Lopez-Amo, L. T. Blair, and P. Urquhart, “Wavelength-division-multiplexed distributed optical fiber amplifier bus network for data and sensors,” Opt. Lett. 18(14), 1159–1161 (1993). [PubMed]

]. Most recently, the technique also attracted much attention from many space engineers, because of their high signal amplification performance and low weight. Especially, Yb-doped power amplifiers are envisioned to amplify the master laser of the Mars Laser Terminal (MLT) for the Mars Laser Communications Demonstration Project (MLCD), which will demonstrate one possible solution to meet NASA’s future long-haul communication needs [3

3. D. M. Boroson, A. Biswas, and B. L. Edwards, “MLCD: Overview of NASA’s mars laser communications demonstration system,” Proc. SPIE 5338, 16–28 (2004).

,4

4. H. Hemmati, A. Biswas, and D. M. Boroson, “30-dB data rate improvement for interplanetary laser communication,” Proc. SPIE 6877, 687707–1-687707–8 (2008).

]. However, the fiber amplifiers will face a harsh radiation environment of various types during their stay in orbit.

Many research groups have note the disadvantage of EDFAs, however, little effort is spent on the study of radiation effect on EYDFAs. There are two reasons for that. Firstly, many important space optical communication programs are carried out by NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) [9

9. E. Korevaar, R. J. Hofmeister, and J. Schuster., “Design of satellite terminal for BMDO lasercom technology demonstration,” Proc. SPIE 2381, 60–71 (1995).

,10

10. J. Shoemaker, P. Brooks, E. Korevaar, G. Arnold, A. Das, J. Stubstad, and R. G. Hay, “The space technology research vehicle (STRV) −2 program,” Proc. SPIE 4136, 36–47 (2000).

] and ESA (European Space Agency) [11

11. B. Laurent and O. Duchmann, “The Silex Project: The first European optical intersatellite link experiment,” Proc. SPIE 1417, 2–12 (1991).

13

13. T. Nielsenetal, “In orbit test results of the first SILEX termina,” Proc. SPIE 3615, 31–42 (1999).

] many years ago. And considering that the EDFA is the most mature technique of amplification in that time, many studies are focus on EDFAs for the requirements of these programs. Secondly, any type of fiber amplifiers cannot work normally again after radiation, because the radiation experiment is a failure experiment. Meanwhile, EYDFA is much more expensive than EDFA. So the cost of radiation experiment is another important problem for the study on the EYDFA. In this paper we will report the experimental results about the radiation effect on high power EYDFA in low dose environment. Some key parameters of EYDFA have been measured in the radiation experiment, such as central wavelength, half width, gain, noise figure (NF) and so on. The experimental results will be a good reference for the space communication designers.

2. Experiment set-up

Figure 1
Fig. 1 Experiment apparatus to measure the radiation effect on EYDFA
is the experimental apparatus for measuring the radiation effect on EYDFA. The light source is a tunable laser diode. And the peak wavelength is set to 1550.13nm by computer. The input power of signal can be controlled by the variable optical attenuator. And the deterioration characteristics of EYDFA will be measured by optical spectrum analyzer and lightwave multimeter. Considering that the measurement instruments will be also affected by gamma radiation, just EYDFA is put in the radiation chamber, while the other measurement instruments are in the testing chamber. These two parts can be connected by 15m fibers and serial port line RS232 during the testing conveniently.

The EYDFA is a benchtop C-band amplifier. And the configuration of EYDFA is shown in Fig. 2
Fig. 2 The configuration of benchtop C-band EYDFA with two special bed plates
. From the figure, it is composed of a key OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) amplifier and other matching equipment. There are two layers in the OEM amplifier in fact. Erbium-ytterbium co-doped fiber (EYDF) and some optical components are in the top layer. While the pump laser diode and circuit board are in the bottom layer. Considering many functions of benchtop amplifier will be not used in space optical communication, only the OEM amplifier is exposed to the radiation environment in our radiation experiment. And the other parts of benchtop amplifier will be covered by lead brick in the radiation chamber. In order to ensure the accuracy and uniformity of the radiation effect on the OEM amplifier, we also make two special bed plates to make the EYDFA stand vertically to the radiation source in the experiment. That is also shown in Fig. 2.

3. Experiment results and discussion

60Co is used as the radiation source in experiment. EYDFA is radiated to the radiation dose of 50krad at the dose rate of 40rad/s. Therefore, the EYDFA will be radiated by 60Co for 1250 seconds in the whole radiation experiment. The dose of 50krad is a typical dose level of low dose space radiation environment for several years. And the dose of 10krad, 20krad, 30krad, 40krad and 50krad are chosen as the break points in radiation experiment. The radiation will stop when each break point is arrived. Then the characteristics parameters of EYDFA will be measured in about 5 minutes.

Considering that many optical instruments are sensitive to the peak wavelength and half width of signal, these two critical parameters have been measured at each break point. Table 1

Table 1. Experimental results of peak wavelength and half width

table-icon
View This Table
shows the radiation experimental results of peak wavelength and half width at the different dose. And the resolution of the optical spectrum analyzer is set to 0.01nm in radiation experiment. The peak wavelength and the half width of input signal show a little fluctuation characteristics because of the tunable laser diode. However, it is clear that the peak wavelength and the half width of input signal will not change after the low dose radiation. The experimental results indicate that the radiation effect on EYDFA chiefly introduces the transmission loss, but the physical mechanics of amplification is not changed by radiation. That is the same as the EDFA [7

7. O. Berne, M. Caussanel, and O. Gilard, “A Model for the prediction of EDFA gain in a space radiation environment,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16(10), 2227–2229 (2004).

]. Therefore, the results assure the precondition of the application for EYDFA in space optical communication systems.

It is also should note that OEM amplifier is composed of the EYDF, optical isolators, the WDM optical couplers, pump laser diode and the circuit board. Therefore, the deterioration of gain and NF showed in Fig. 3(a) and Fig. 3(b) should be ascribed to all the components in fact. In this viewpoint, the radiation effect on the other components should be also investigated further here. The deterioration of the optical isolators and the WDM optical couplers can be neglected usually [14

14. T. S. Rose, D. Gunn, and G. C. Valley, “Gamma and proton radiation effect in erbium-doped amplifiers: Active and passive measurements,” J. Lightwave Technol. 19(12), 1918–1923 (2001).

]. However, less studies of the radiation effect on the circuit board and the pump laser diode have been reported. In order to evaluate the radiation effect on these two components, some other parameters have been further measured here. Figure 3(c) shows the monitored and measured output power as a function of radiation dose. It is clear that these two results are almost the same. It indicates that the monitoring pin of OEM amplifier can be operated normally after the radiation dose of 50krad. In another word, the monitor circuit can still provide the function of ACC (Automatic Current Control) or APC (Automatic Power Control) in this radiation environment.

Another phenomenon should be also noted for the designers. That is an interesting phenomenon which we find in the radiation experiment accidentally. At the initial experimental program, we also intend to monitor the parameters of EYDFA by remote operator panel when the amplifier is radiated. However, once the radiation starts, the EYDFA will shut off immediately. Furthermore, the remote function of EYDFA can recover normally as usual when the radiation stops. We have tried several times in the experiment. The possible reason could be that the remote control circuit of EYDFA is sensitive to the radiation dose rate but not the total radiation dose. Therefore, although we do not make sure the relationship between the phenomenon and the dose rate, the designers should better to test this remote function at the real space radiation dose rate before the function is used.

Considering the requirements of actual space optical communication systems, the deterioration is a little big after the radiation dose of 50krad. Furthermore, since the dose which EYDFAs will face is less than 50krad in many low-dose orbits, the designers should be better to evaluate the deterioration of the EYDFA with our experiment results according to the total dose of actual orbit carefully. And the designers should better note the linear variation characteristics of gain in low dose radiation environment for evaluation. If the characteristics affected by the radiation cannot satisfy the requirements of the real systems, the EYDFA should be made some special radiation protection.

4. Conclusion

We have studied the radiation effects on the EYDFA by experiment for space optical communication. The EYDFA has been radiated to the total radiation dose of 50krad at the dose rate of 40rad/s in the paper. The no change of peak wavelength and half width ensures the precondition of the application for EYDFA in space communication systems. Furthermore, the experimental results show that the radiation effect on the EYDFA can be chiefly ascribed to the factor of EYDF. Considering that the deterioration is a little big, and the dose which EYDFAs will face is less than 50krad in many low-dose orbits, the designers should evaluate the deterioration of the EYDFA with our experiment results according to the total dose of actual orbit carefully. And if the characteristics of radiated EYDFA cannot satisfy the requirements of the actual systems, the EYDFA should be made some special radiation protection. Since we just have one sample of EYDFA, some comparative experiments cannot be carried out further. However, the experimental results will also be a good reference for the space optical communication designers. Considering the importance of EYDFA in space optical communication, more effort is further needed to study the radiation effect on EYDFA both in experiment and theory in future.

References and links

1.

Y. Mochida, N. Yamaguchi, and G. Ishikawa, “Technology-oriented review and vision of 40-Gb/s-based optical transport networks,” J. Lightwave Technol. 20(12), 2272–2281 (2002).

2.

M. Lopez-Amo, L. T. Blair, and P. Urquhart, “Wavelength-division-multiplexed distributed optical fiber amplifier bus network for data and sensors,” Opt. Lett. 18(14), 1159–1161 (1993). [PubMed]

3.

D. M. Boroson, A. Biswas, and B. L. Edwards, “MLCD: Overview of NASA’s mars laser communications demonstration system,” Proc. SPIE 5338, 16–28 (2004).

4.

H. Hemmati, A. Biswas, and D. M. Boroson, “30-dB data rate improvement for interplanetary laser communication,” Proc. SPIE 6877, 687707–1-687707–8 (2008).

5.

G. M. Williams and E. J. Friebele, “Space radiation effects on erbium-doped fiber devices: sources, amplifiers, and passive measurements,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 45(3), 1531–1536 (1998).

6.

G. M. Williams, B. M. Wright, W. D. Mack, and E. J. Friebele, “Projecting the performance of erbium-doped fiber devices in a space radiation environment,” Proc. SPIE 3848, 271–280 (1999).

7.

O. Berne, M. Caussanel, and O. Gilard, “A Model for the prediction of EDFA gain in a space radiation environment,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16(10), 2227–2229 (2004).

8.

Y. Chigusa, M. Watanabe, M. Kyoto, M. Ooe, T. Matsubara, S. Okamoto, T. Yamamoto, T. Iida, and K. Sumita, “γ-ray and neutron irradiation characteristics of pure silica core single mode fiber and its life time estimation,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 35(1), 894–897 (1988).

9.

E. Korevaar, R. J. Hofmeister, and J. Schuster., “Design of satellite terminal for BMDO lasercom technology demonstration,” Proc. SPIE 2381, 60–71 (1995).

10.

J. Shoemaker, P. Brooks, E. Korevaar, G. Arnold, A. Das, J. Stubstad, and R. G. Hay, “The space technology research vehicle (STRV) −2 program,” Proc. SPIE 4136, 36–47 (2000).

11.

B. Laurent and O. Duchmann, “The Silex Project: The first European optical intersatellite link experiment,” Proc. SPIE 1417, 2–12 (1991).

12.

R. Craig, B. Li, and B. Chan, “Laser qualification for the SILEX program,” Proc. SPIE 2123, 238–242 (1994).

13.

T. Nielsenetal, “In orbit test results of the first SILEX termina,” Proc. SPIE 3615, 31–42 (1999).

14.

T. S. Rose, D. Gunn, and G. C. Valley, “Gamma and proton radiation effect in erbium-doped amplifiers: Active and passive measurements,” J. Lightwave Technol. 19(12), 1918–1923 (2001).

15.

H. Ohyama, E. Simoen, C. Claeys, T. Hakata, T. Kudou, M. Yoneoka, K. Kobayashi, M. Nakabayashi, Y. Takami, and H. Sunaga, “Radiation-induced lattice defects in InGaAsP laser diodes and their effects on device performance,” Physica B 273–274(1-3), 1031–1033 (1999).

16.

S. L. Waterhouse, and K. K. Jobbins, “Radiation effects on laser diodes: A literary review,” Proc. SPIE 7070, 70700E–1–70700E–10 (2008).

17.

W. C. Goitsos, “Radiation-induced loss studies in Er-doped fiber amplifier systems,” Proc. SPIE 2699, 304–309 (1996).

OCIS Codes
(060.2320) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber optics amplifiers and oscillators
(060.2330) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fiber optics communications
(350.5610) Other areas of optics : Radiation
(060.2605) Fiber optics and optical communications : Free-space optical communication

ToC Category:
Fiber Optics and Optical Communications

History
Original Manuscript: June 19, 2009
Revised Manuscript: July 27, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: July 27, 2009
Published: August 18, 2009

Citation
Jing Ma, Mi Li, Liying Tan, Yanping Zhou, Siyuan Yu, and Qiwen Ran, "Experimental investigation of radiation effect on erbium-ytterbium co-doped fiber amplifier for space optical communication in low-dose radiation environment," Opt. Express 17, 15571-15577 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-18-15571


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References

  1. Y. Mochida, N. Yamaguchi, and G. Ishikawa, “Technology-oriented review and vision of 40-Gb/s-based optical transport networks,” J. Lightwave Technol. 20(12), 2272–2281 (2002).
  2. M. Lopez-Amo, L. T. Blair, and P. Urquhart, “Wavelength-division-multiplexed distributed optical fiber amplifier bus network for data and sensors,” Opt. Lett. 18(14), 1159–1161 (1993). [PubMed]
  3. D. M. Boroson, A. Biswas, and B. L. Edwards, “MLCD: Overview of NASA’s mars laser communications demonstration system,” Proc. SPIE 5338, 16–28 (2004).
  4. H. Hemmati, A. Biswas, and D. M. Boroson, “30-dB data rate improvement for interplanetary laser communication,” Proc. SPIE 6877, 687707–1-687707–8 (2008).
  5. G. M. Williams and E. J. Friebele, “Space radiation effects on erbium-doped fiber devices: sources, amplifiers, and passive measurements,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 45(3), 1531–1536 (1998).
  6. G. M. Williams, B. M. Wright, W. D. Mack, and E. J. Friebele, “Projecting the performance of erbium-doped fiber devices in a space radiation environment,” Proc. SPIE 3848, 271–280 (1999).
  7. O. Berne, M. Caussanel, and O. Gilard, “A Model for the prediction of EDFA gain in a space radiation environment,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16(10), 2227–2229 (2004).
  8. Y. Chigusa, M. Watanabe, M. Kyoto, M. Ooe, T. Matsubara, S. Okamoto, T. Yamamoto, T. Iida, and K. Sumita, “γ-ray and neutron irradiation characteristics of pure silica core single mode fiber and its life time estimation,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 35(1), 894–897 (1988).
  9. E. Korevaar, R. J. Hofmeister, J. Schuster, et al., “Design of satellite terminal for BMDO lasercom technology demonstration,” Proc. SPIE 2381, 60–71 (1995).
  10. J. Shoemaker, P. Brooks, E. Korevaar, G. Arnold, A. Das, J. Stubstad, and R. G. Hay, “The space technology research vehicle (STRV) −2 program,” Proc. SPIE 4136, 36–47 (2000).
  11. B. Laurent and O. Duchmann, “The Silex Project: The first European optical intersatellite link experiment,” Proc. SPIE 1417, 2–12 (1991).
  12. R. Craig, B. Li, and B. Chan, “Laser qualification for the SILEX program,” Proc. SPIE 2123, 238–242 (1994).
  13. T. Nielsenetal, “In orbit test results of the first SILEX termina,” Proc. SPIE 3615, 31–42 (1999).
  14. T. S. Rose, D. Gunn, and G. C. Valley, “Gamma and proton radiation effect in erbium-doped amplifiers: Active and passive measurements,” J. Lightwave Technol. 19(12), 1918–1923 (2001).
  15. H. Ohyama, E. Simoen, C. Claeys, T. Hakata, T. Kudou, M. Yoneoka, K. Kobayashi, M. Nakabayashi, Y. Takami, and H. Sunaga, “Radiation-induced lattice defects in InGaAsP laser diodes and their effects on device performance,” Physica B 273–274(1-3), 1031–1033 (1999).
  16. S. L. Waterhouse, and K. K. Jobbins, “Radiation effects on laser diodes: A literary review,” Proc. SPIE 7070, 70700E–1–70700E–10 (2008).
  17. W. C. Goitsos, “Radiation-induced loss studies in Er-doped fiber amplifier systems,” Proc. SPIE 2699, 304–309 (1996).

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