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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 20 — Sep. 28, 2009
  • pp: 17596–17602
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All-fiber cavity dumping

M. Malmström, Z. Yu, W. Margulis, O. Tarasenko, and F. Laurell  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 20, pp. 17596-17602 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.017596


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Abstract

Cavity dumping of an all-fiber laser system is demonstrated. The active element is a pulse-picker with nanosecond rise time consisting of a microstructured fiber with electrically driven internal electrodes. The device is used for intracavity polarization rotation and dumping through a polarization splitter. The optical flux is removed from the cavity within one roundtrip and most of the amplified spontaneous emission, spiking and relaxation oscillation that follow during the gain recovery phase of the laser are blocked from the output signal.

© 2009 OSA

1. Introduction

Cavity dumping has been used in the past as a means to remove the optical flux from laser oscillators [1

1. A. A. Vuylsteke, “Theory of Laser Regeneration Switching,” J. Appl. Phys. 34(6), 1615–1622 (1963), http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1702644. [CrossRef]

]. The technique is particularly useful in the generation of higher powers in lasers where the gain medium does not accumulate population inversion for a long time, such as in gas [2

2. F. Keilmann and E. Koteles, “Cavity-dumping a mode-locked TEA CO 2 laser,” Opt. Quantum Electron. 12(4), 347–349 (1980), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00620290. [CrossRef]

], dye [3

3. V. Sundström and T. Gillbro, “Pulse properties of a synchronously mode-locked, cavity dumped, picosecond dye laser system,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process. 24, 233–238 (1981), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00899763.

] and Ti:sapphire lasers [4

4. M. Ramaswamy, M. Ulman, J. Paye, and J. G. Fujimoto, “Cavity-dumped femtosecond Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:A12O3laser,” Opt. Lett. 18(21), 1822–1824 (1993), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-18-21-1822. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Cavity dumping also finds applications in conjunction with mode-locking, in the generation of high power ultrashort pulses [5

5. A. Killi, J. Dörring, U. Morgner, M. Lederer, J. Frei, and D. Kopf, “High speed electro-optical cavity dumping of mode-locked laser oscillators,” Opt. Express 13(6), 1916–1922 (2005), http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OPEX.13.001916. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,6

6. A. Steinmann, A. Killi, G. Palmer, T. Binhammer, and U. Morgner, “Generation of few-cycle pulses directly from a MHz-NOPA,” Opt. Express 14(22), 10627–10630 (2006), http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.14.010627. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], where pulse recirculation is required in the shortening process and the Q-factor of the cavity is generally high. The development of new types of fiber lasers based on novel gain media [7

7. A. E. Vasdekis, G. E. Town, G. A. Turnbull, and I. D. W. Samuel, “Fluidic fibre dye lasers,” Opt. Express 15(7), 3962–3967 (2007), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-7-3962. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,8

8. J. Schäfer, J. P. Mondia, R. Sharma, and Z. H. Lu, “Quantum Dot Microdrop Laser,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper CTuJJ6 http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=URI=CLEO-2008-CTuJJ6

] would benefit from the integrated functionality of cavity dumping. For this to be possible, a fiber-based intracavity switch should be used, with switching times much less than the cavity roundtrip. Various demonstrations of bulk optics-based systems have been reported, for example with acousto-optic modulation [10

10. C. C. Renaud, R. J. Selvas-Aguilar, J. Nilsson, P. W. Turner, and A. B. Grudinin, “Compact high-energy Q-switched cladding-pumped fiber laser with a tuning range over 40 nm,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11(8), 976–978 (1999), http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/68.775318. [CrossRef]

,9

9. I. Abdulhalim, C. N. Pannell, K. P. Jedrzejewski, and E. R. Taylor, “Cavity dumping of neodymium-doped fibre lasers using an acoustooptic modulator,” Opt. Quantum Electron. 26(11), 997–1001 (1994), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00304999. [CrossRef]

], single crystal photo-elastic modulation [11

11. F. Bammer and R. Petkovsek, “Q-switching of a fiber laser with a single crystal photo-elastic modulator,” Opt. Express 15(10), 6177–6182 (2007), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-10-6177. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] or a MEMS system [12

12. C. J. S. de Matos and W. Margulis, “Optical fibre modulator based on electrostatic attraction,” Opt. Commun. 190(1-6), 135–139 (2001), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0030-4018(01)01036-7. [CrossRef]

,13

13. M. Fabert, A. Desfarges-Berthelemot, V. Kermène, A. Crunteanu, D. Bouyge, and P. Blondy, “Ytterbium-doped fibre laser Q-switched by a cantilever-type micro-mirror,” Opt. Express 16(26), 22064–22071 (2008), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-26-22064. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. However these systems require tedious alignment and have high loss due to Fresnel reflections at the different glass, air and crystal interfaces. Therefore a component with fast switching of the guided light in an all-fiber laser setup would be favorable. Switching or modulating light in all-fiber lasers has also been demonstrated, usually with a piezoelectric actuator mechanically pressing on the fiber and introducing losses [14

14. A. Chandonnet and G. Larose, “High-power Q-switched erbium fiber laser using an all-fiber intensity modulator,” Opt. Eng. 32(9), 2031–2035 (1993), http://link.aip.org/link/?JOE/32/2031/1. [CrossRef]

] or birefringence [15

15. Y. Kaneda, Y. Hu, C. Spiegelberg, J. Geng, and S. Jiang, “Single-frequency, all-fiber Q-switched laser at 1550 nm,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics (TOPS), G. Quarles, ed., Vol. 94 of OSA Trends in Optics and Photonics (Optical Society of America, 2004), paper 126 http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ASSP-2004-126

], or with modulation of fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) [16

16. M. Delgado-Pinar, D. Zalvidea, A. Diez, P. Perez-Millan, and M. Andres, “Q-switching of an all-fiber laser by acousto-optic modulation of a fiber Bragg grating,” Opt. Express 14(3), 1106–1112 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?uri=OE-14-3-1106. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,17

17. F. Luo and T. Yeh, “LPFG modulator for fiber laser Q switching,” Proc. SPIE 7195, 719522 (2009), http://link.aip.org/link/?PSI/7195/719522/1. [CrossRef]

]. Problems with these methods include hysteresis, mechanical relaxation, slow rise and fall time and low extinction ratio.

As a proof of principle, this work shows how a fiber pulse-picker can be used to cavity dump an all-fiber erbium doped ring laser. All the laser radiation is dumped within one round trip without ring down, at a repetition rate continuously tunable up to 1.5 kHz. The component used [18

18. Z. Yu, H. Knape, O. Tarasenko, R. Koch, and W. Margulis, “All-fiber single-pulse selection and nanosecond gating,” Opt. Lett. 34(7), 1024–1026 (2009), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-34-7-1024. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] consists of a microstructured fiber with electrically driven internal electrodes for polarization rotation. The maximum average pulse energy extracted is 5.4 nJ with a peak power of ~54 mW. Although the gain medium used here has long lifetime and is therefore more useful for Q-switching, the use of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier is highly convenient for the performance characterization and optimization of the switching process. The cavity dumper developed here can be readily used with other laser systems where gain accumulation is not efficient.

2. The pulse-picker

The component described in detail earlier [18

18. Z. Yu, H. Knape, O. Tarasenko, R. Koch, and W. Margulis, “All-fiber single-pulse selection and nanosecond gating,” Opt. Lett. 34(7), 1024–1026 (2009), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-34-7-1024. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] is based on a microstructured fiber with four holes parallel to the core. The fiber is 125 μm in diameter with a core diameter of 8 μm. The device is manufactured to be single mode at 1.5 µm and compatible with standard telecommunication components. The 28 μm diameter holes are filled with BiSn alloy creating resistive electrodes inside the fiber, two of which are connected to SMA contacts, depicted in Fig. 1
Fig. 1 SEM picture of the cross section of the four-hole fiber used here.
.

3. Experimental

The laser system used in the experiment is a spliced all-fiber ring cavity, based on telecom 125/8 μm diameter/core fibers and components, depicted in Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Setup for all-fiber cavity dumping.
.

It consists of a 1 m long highly doped Er3+ fiber (core diameter 8 µm and 44 dB/m absorption @ 978 nm) pumped in the backward direction by a fiber coupled 976 nm diode laser through a 0.98/1.55 μm wavelength division multiplexer (WDM) fusion coupler.

A circulator in combination with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is placed before the output port from the cavity, in order to filter out amplified spontaneous emission from the output signal and act as an unidirectional isolator. The FBG has high reflectivity (99.99%) at the laser wavelength 1546.96 nm and a bandwidth of 50 pm.

A fiber polarization splitter analyses the polarization state and after switching dumps vertically polarized light to the output port. The intracavity flux is monitored through a beam splitter (1% fiber tap). Power meters, 1- and 10 GHz photodiodes connected to an oscilloscope and an optical spectrum analyzer to analyze the performance of the laser.

Polarization controller 1 (PC1) is adjusted so that light arrives at the pulse-picker linearly polarized and with the appropriate orientation for full switching when the pulse-picker switches ON. PC2 is then adjusted so that continuous wave (CW) lasing can start in the forward direction when the pulse-picker is OFF, and all the flux passes through port H of the polarization splitter.

When the pulse-picker is switched ON, the circulating radiation is directed to port V of the polarization splitter, i.e., emptying the cavity and creating an output pulse, as shown in the oscilloscope trace of Fig. 3
Fig. 3 (a) Electrical pulses applied to the pulse-picker causing it to switch ON and OFF and (b) the output optical pulse.
. The optical pulsewidth corresponds to the cavity roundtrip time. The pulse-picker is switched OFF some nanoseconds after the cavity flux is emptied, allowing laser oscillation to rebuild.

On a long time-scale, the signal at the output port consists of a single cavity dumped pulse, followed by low amplitude noise, as seen in Fig. 4(a)
Fig. 4 (a) Averaged trace of optical output when cavity dumping at time t~0. (b) Corresponding intracavity signal showing the cavity being emptied at time t~0 and the laser action recovery with spiking and relaxation oscillations.
. Most of the spiking and relaxation oscillations that follow during the gain recovery phase of the laser seen in Fig. 4(b) (intracavity flux) are blocked from the output signal with a measured rejection ratio of ~25 dB. It should be noted that the relaxation oscillations converge on an even longer time scale to CW operation, at the amplitude level seen at t < 0 in Fig. 4(b).

The laser system is operated successfully at repetition rates continually tunable up to 1.5 kHz. However, at rates above 150 Hz the relaxation oscillations shown in Fig. 4(b) have not yet settled into CW operation, resulting in unstable dumping, unless the timing for the application of the HV pulse to the polarization rotator is fine tuned to guarantee stable operation.

Figure 5(a)
Fig. 5 (a) Average pulse energy and peak power of cavity dumped laser at 40 Hz. The inset shows the pulse shape. b) Output over time for two different cavity lengths.
displays the pump power versus average peak power and pulse energy, for a pulse of full width half maximum (FWHM) 100 ns (seen in the inset). Here, the output pulses have a FWHM ~100 ns and rise- and falltime ~45 ns. The optical pulse energy is 5.4 nJ and the peak power 54 mW, when pumping with 550 mW (~500 mW is absorbed by the Er-doped fiber).

Since the optical flux is removed within one roundtrip, an output peak power of 54 mW indicates that the intracavity lasing is running CW with a quantum efficiency of ~10% before the dumping. This relatively low value is mainly due to the excess loss of the non-optimal components employed.

The peak power of this setup is limited by cavity losses and the available pump power. Scaling the CW power to the limit of the most vulnerable component - the circulator specified to 500 mW – should be possible. The pulse-picker ought to be able to withstand as much optical flux as a standard 125/8 μm cladding/core diameter fiber. The output pulsewidth could be altered by inserting a length of fiber between the beam-splitter and the Erbium-doped fiber. Figure 5(b) shows output pulses from two cavities of different lengths. The pulse acquires a top-hat shape when the cavity roundtrip time is significantly longer than the risetime of the pulse-picker. The shortest pulse switched is limited in practice by the length of the leads of the various components employed.

The laser cavity used in this study does not consist of polarization maintaining fiber. Some instability occurred, particularly when longer cavity lengths and higher pump powers are employed. It is possible to observe, in some cases, rapid oscillations within one cavity dumped pulse, as illustrated in Fig. 6
Fig. 6 Rapid oscillations (2.6 ns period) observed in a single cavity dumped pulse.
. The typical period is in the range 2-10 ns, much faster than the roundtrip time of the cavity, which is equal to the envelope width of the pulse switched.

A full physical explanation for the behavior observed is not available at present. Similar rapid oscillations have been reported in the literature before, associated with polarization effects [21

21. Q. L. Williams, J. García-Ojalvo, and R. Roy, “Fast intracavity polarization dynamics of an erbium-doped fiber ring laser: Inclusion of stochastic effects,” Phys. Rev. A 55(3), 2376–2386 (1997), http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.55.2376. [CrossRef]

], Risken-Nummedal-Graham-Haken instability [22

22. E. M. Pessina, J. Redondo, E. Roldán, and G. J. Valcárcel,“Multimode instability in ring fiber lasers,” Phys. Rev. A 60(3), 2517–2528 (1999), http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.60.2517. [CrossRef]

], the Kerr effect [23

23. H. D. I. Abarbanel, M. B. Kennel, M. Buhl, and C. T. Lewis, “Chaotic dynamics in erbium-doped fiber ring lasers,” Phys. Rev. A 60(3), 2360–2374 (1999), http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.60.2360. [CrossRef]

] and electrostriction [24

24. E. L. Buckland and R. W. Boyd, “Electrostrictive contribution to the intensity-dependent refractive index of optical fibers,” Opt. Lett. 21(15), 1117–1119 (1996), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-21-15-1117. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,25

25. P. J. Hardman, P. D. Townsend, A. J. Poustie, and K. J. Blow, “Experimental investigation of resonant enhancement of the acoustic interaction of optical pulses in an optical fiber,” Opt. Lett. 21(6), 393–395 (1996), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-21-6-393. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In a CW-mode, i.e. no switching, the rapid oscillations persist over ~0.1–10 ms. The period of these oscillations is not changed by introducing a section of high birefringence fiber into the cavity, but generally shorter periods are observed with spectrally wider FBGs. Removing all polarizing elements from the cavity and analyzing the polarization state at the 1% fiber tap reveals polarization rotation with a period comparable to the rapid oscillations.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion, the first cavity dumped all-fiber laser system based on an integrated polarization rotation pulse-picker is reported. The active component is driven by solid state electronics, has rise- and falltime ~45 ns and is single mode at 1.5 µm. The erbium-doped fiber chosen as gain medium to simplify the characterization of the pulse-picker here can readily be replaced by other types of fiber amplifier where cavity dumping is more advantageous, in particular in a mode-locked regime. Repetition rates up to 1.5 kHz are studied, and 100 ns pulses produced, limited by the cavity roundtrip. The maximum energy measured in the pulses is 5.4 nJ. The optical flux is removed from the cavity within one roundtrip and the amplified spontaneous emission, spiking and relaxation oscillation at the laser output create a background 25 dB lower than the dumped pulses. The laser dynamics occasionally experiences a fast pulsing behavior, and the cavity dumped pulses then consist of a rapidly varying signal within the cavity roundtrip time.

Acknowledgements

It is a pleasure to thank Dr. Carola Sterner for the fabrication the FBGs, and Mats Eriksson and Helena- Eriksson-Quist at Acreo Fiberlab for the microstructured fiber used in the experiments. Discussions with Prof. J. R. Taylor at Imperial College, London are also gratefully acknowledged.

References and links

1.

A. A. Vuylsteke, “Theory of Laser Regeneration Switching,” J. Appl. Phys. 34(6), 1615–1622 (1963), http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1702644. [CrossRef]

2.

F. Keilmann and E. Koteles, “Cavity-dumping a mode-locked TEA CO 2 laser,” Opt. Quantum Electron. 12(4), 347–349 (1980), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00620290. [CrossRef]

3.

V. Sundström and T. Gillbro, “Pulse properties of a synchronously mode-locked, cavity dumped, picosecond dye laser system,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process. 24, 233–238 (1981), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00899763.

4.

M. Ramaswamy, M. Ulman, J. Paye, and J. G. Fujimoto, “Cavity-dumped femtosecond Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:A12O3laser,” Opt. Lett. 18(21), 1822–1824 (1993), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-18-21-1822. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

A. Killi, J. Dörring, U. Morgner, M. Lederer, J. Frei, and D. Kopf, “High speed electro-optical cavity dumping of mode-locked laser oscillators,” Opt. Express 13(6), 1916–1922 (2005), http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OPEX.13.001916. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

A. Steinmann, A. Killi, G. Palmer, T. Binhammer, and U. Morgner, “Generation of few-cycle pulses directly from a MHz-NOPA,” Opt. Express 14(22), 10627–10630 (2006), http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.14.010627. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

A. E. Vasdekis, G. E. Town, G. A. Turnbull, and I. D. W. Samuel, “Fluidic fibre dye lasers,” Opt. Express 15(7), 3962–3967 (2007), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-7-3962. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

J. Schäfer, J. P. Mondia, R. Sharma, and Z. H. Lu, “Quantum Dot Microdrop Laser,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper CTuJJ6 http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=URI=CLEO-2008-CTuJJ6

9.

I. Abdulhalim, C. N. Pannell, K. P. Jedrzejewski, and E. R. Taylor, “Cavity dumping of neodymium-doped fibre lasers using an acoustooptic modulator,” Opt. Quantum Electron. 26(11), 997–1001 (1994), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00304999. [CrossRef]

10.

C. C. Renaud, R. J. Selvas-Aguilar, J. Nilsson, P. W. Turner, and A. B. Grudinin, “Compact high-energy Q-switched cladding-pumped fiber laser with a tuning range over 40 nm,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11(8), 976–978 (1999), http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/68.775318. [CrossRef]

11.

F. Bammer and R. Petkovsek, “Q-switching of a fiber laser with a single crystal photo-elastic modulator,” Opt. Express 15(10), 6177–6182 (2007), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-10-6177. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

C. J. S. de Matos and W. Margulis, “Optical fibre modulator based on electrostatic attraction,” Opt. Commun. 190(1-6), 135–139 (2001), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0030-4018(01)01036-7. [CrossRef]

13.

M. Fabert, A. Desfarges-Berthelemot, V. Kermène, A. Crunteanu, D. Bouyge, and P. Blondy, “Ytterbium-doped fibre laser Q-switched by a cantilever-type micro-mirror,” Opt. Express 16(26), 22064–22071 (2008), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-26-22064. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

A. Chandonnet and G. Larose, “High-power Q-switched erbium fiber laser using an all-fiber intensity modulator,” Opt. Eng. 32(9), 2031–2035 (1993), http://link.aip.org/link/?JOE/32/2031/1. [CrossRef]

15.

Y. Kaneda, Y. Hu, C. Spiegelberg, J. Geng, and S. Jiang, “Single-frequency, all-fiber Q-switched laser at 1550 nm,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics (TOPS), G. Quarles, ed., Vol. 94 of OSA Trends in Optics and Photonics (Optical Society of America, 2004), paper 126 http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ASSP-2004-126

16.

M. Delgado-Pinar, D. Zalvidea, A. Diez, P. Perez-Millan, and M. Andres, “Q-switching of an all-fiber laser by acousto-optic modulation of a fiber Bragg grating,” Opt. Express 14(3), 1106–1112 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?uri=OE-14-3-1106. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

F. Luo and T. Yeh, “LPFG modulator for fiber laser Q switching,” Proc. SPIE 7195, 719522 (2009), http://link.aip.org/link/?PSI/7195/719522/1. [CrossRef]

18.

Z. Yu, H. Knape, O. Tarasenko, R. Koch, and W. Margulis, “All-fiber single-pulse selection and nanosecond gating,” Opt. Lett. 34(7), 1024–1026 (2009), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-34-7-1024. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

H. Knape and W. Margulis, “All-fiber polarization switch,” Opt. Lett. 32(6), 614–616 (2007), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-32-6-614. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

Z. Yu, W. Margulis, O. Tarasenko, H. Knape, and P. Y. Fonjallaz, “Nanosecond switching of fiber Bragg gratings,” Opt. Express 15(22), 14948–14953 (2007), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-22-14948. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

Q. L. Williams, J. García-Ojalvo, and R. Roy, “Fast intracavity polarization dynamics of an erbium-doped fiber ring laser: Inclusion of stochastic effects,” Phys. Rev. A 55(3), 2376–2386 (1997), http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.55.2376. [CrossRef]

22.

E. M. Pessina, J. Redondo, E. Roldán, and G. J. Valcárcel,“Multimode instability in ring fiber lasers,” Phys. Rev. A 60(3), 2517–2528 (1999), http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.60.2517. [CrossRef]

23.

H. D. I. Abarbanel, M. B. Kennel, M. Buhl, and C. T. Lewis, “Chaotic dynamics in erbium-doped fiber ring lasers,” Phys. Rev. A 60(3), 2360–2374 (1999), http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevA.60.2360. [CrossRef]

24.

E. L. Buckland and R. W. Boyd, “Electrostrictive contribution to the intensity-dependent refractive index of optical fibers,” Opt. Lett. 21(15), 1117–1119 (1996), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-21-15-1117. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

25.

P. J. Hardman, P. D. Townsend, A. J. Poustie, and K. J. Blow, “Experimental investigation of resonant enhancement of the acoustic interaction of optical pulses in an optical fiber,” Opt. Lett. 21(6), 393–395 (1996), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-21-6-393. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(060.2410) Fiber optics and optical communications : Fibers, erbium
(060.7140) Fiber optics and optical communications : Ultrafast processes in fibers
(140.3560) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, ring
(190.4370) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics, fibers
(140.3538) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, pulsed
(060.4005) Fiber optics and optical communications : Microstructured fibers

ToC Category:
Fiber Optics and Optical Communications

History
Original Manuscript: August 19, 2009
Revised Manuscript: September 14, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: September 14, 2009
Published: September 16, 2009

Citation
M. Malmström, Z. Yu, W. Margulis, O. Tarasenko, and F. Laurell, "All-fiber cavity dumping," Opt. Express 17, 17596-17602 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-20-17596


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References

  1. A. A. Vuylsteke, “Theory of Laser Regeneration Switching,” J. Appl. Phys. 34(6), 1615–1622 (1963), http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.1702644 . [CrossRef]
  2. F. Keilmann and E. Koteles, “Cavity-dumping a mode-locked TEA CO 2 laser,” Opt. Quantum Electron. 12(4), 347–349 (1980), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00620290 . [CrossRef]
  3. V. Sundström and T. Gillbro, “Pulse properties of a synchronously mode-locked, cavity dumped, picosecond dye laser system,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process. 24, 233–238 (1981), http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00899763 .
  4. M. Ramaswamy, M. Ulman, J. Paye, and J. G. Fujimoto, “Cavity-dumped femtosecond Kerr-lens mode-locked Ti:A12O3laser,” Opt. Lett. 18(21), 1822–1824 (1993), http://ol.osa.org/abstract.cfm?URI=ol-18-21-1822 . [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. A. Killi, J. Dörring, U. Morgner, M. Lederer, J. Frei, and D. Kopf, “High speed electro-optical cavity dumping of mode-locked laser oscillators,” Opt. Express 13(6), 1916–1922 (2005), http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OPEX.13.001916 . [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. A. Steinmann, A. Killi, G. Palmer, T. Binhammer, and U. Morgner, “Generation of few-cycle pulses directly from a MHz-NOPA,” Opt. Express 14(22), 10627–10630 (2006), http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.14.010627 . [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. A. E. Vasdekis, G. E. Town, G. A. Turnbull, and I. D. W. Samuel, “Fluidic fibre dye lasers,” Opt. Express 15(7), 3962–3967 (2007), http://www.opticsexpress.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-7-3962 . [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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