OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 23 — Nov. 9, 2009
  • pp: 20816–20823
« Show journal navigation

Sub-100 W picosecond output from a phase-conjugate Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier

K. Nawata, M. Okida, K. Furuki, K. Miyamoto, and T. Omatsu  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 23, pp. 20816-20823 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.020816


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (254 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We demonstrated >80 W picosecond output at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 MHz from a dual Nd:YVO4 amplifier laser system consisting of a phase-conjugate Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier combined with a second diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier. The output exhibited high quality spatial form with M2 < 1.8 and a pulse duration (FWHM) of 9.2 ps. A peak power of >7.4 MW with an average power of 78.5 W was also achieved at a pulse repetition frequency of 1.0 MHz.

© 2009 OSA

1. Introduction

High-power picosecond lasers have been intensively investigated because they have the potential to be used in various applications, including nonlinear frequency-conversion processes, nonlinear microscopy, and microfabrication [1

1. L. McDonagh, R. Wallenstein, and A. Nebel, “111 W, 110 MHz repetition-rate, passively mode-locked TEM00Nd:YVO4 master oscillator power amplifier pumped at 888 nm,” Opt. Lett. 32(10), 1259–1261 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,2

2. S. Tokita, J. Kawanaka, Y. Izawa, M. Fujita, and T. Kawashima, “23.7-W picosecond cryogenic-Yb:YAG multipass amplifier,” Opt. Express 15(7), 3955–3961 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Most such lasers have been based on a regenerative amplifier scheme and consequently their pulse repetition frequencies have been limited to about 100 kHz [3

3. M. Siebold, M. Hornung, J. Hein, G. Paunescu, R. Sauerbrey, T. Bergmann, and G. Hollemann, “A high-average-power diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative laser amplifier for picosecond-pulses,” Appl. Phys. B 78, 387–390 ( 2004). [CrossRef]

,4

4. J. Kleinbauer, R. Knappe, and R. Wallenstein, “A powerful diode-pumped laser source for micro-machining with ps pulses in the infrared, the visible and the ultraviolet,” Appl. Phys. B 80(3), 315–320 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

].

Side-pumped bounce amplifiers based on a neodymium-doped vanadate slab such as Nd:YVO4 [5

5. A. Agnesi, L. Carra, F. Pirzio, G. Reali, A. Tomaselli, D. Scarpa, and C. Vacchi, “Amplification of a low-power picosecond Nd:YVO4 laser by a diode-laser, side-pumped, grazing-incidence slab amplifier,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 42(8), 772–776 ( 2006). [CrossRef]

,6

6. G. Smith, P. C. Shardlow, and M. J. Damzen, “High-power near-diffraction-limited solid-state amplified spontaneous emission laser devices,” Opt. Lett. 32(13), 1911–1913 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], Nd:GdVO4 [7

7. A. Minassian, B. A. Thompson, G. Smith, and M. J. Damzen, “High-power scaling (>100 W) of a diode-pumped TEM00 Nd:GdVO4 laser system,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11(3), 621–625 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

], and Nd:GdxY1- xVO4 [8

8. N. Shiba, Y. Morimoto, K. Furuki, Y. Tanaka, K. Nawata, M. Okida, and T. Omatsu, “Picosecond master-oscillator, power-amplifier system based on a mixed vanadate phase conjugate bounce amplifier,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16382–16389 ( 2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] exhibit extremely high single-pass gains (>1,000). They are useful for generating high-average-power outputs with high efficiencies in the picosecond regime without using a regenerative amplifier geometry. They are also capable of producing high-repetition rate (megahertz) pulses at a high cost efficiency.

A phase-conjugate master-oscillator power amplifier (PC-MOPA) system formed by bounce amplifiers and a phase-conjugate mirror can produce high output powers from such systems without degrading the beam quality by utilizing a self-aligned multipass geometry [9

9. Y. Ojima, K. Nawata, and T. Omatsu, “Over 10-watt picosecond diffraction-limited output from a Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a phase conjugate mirror,” Opt. Express 13(22), 8993–8998 ( 2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [PubMed]

]. In recent years, we have demonstrated a high average output power (~26 W) with high beam quality (M2 < 1.5) and an extraction efficiency of 35% from a PC-MOPA system based on a side-pumped Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier and a photorefractive phase-conjugate mirror formed from rhodium-doped barium titanate (Rh:BaTiO3) [10

10. K. Nawata, Y. Ojima, M. Okida, T. Ogawa, and T. Omatsu, “Power scaling of a pico-second Nd:YVO(4) master-oscillator power amplifier with a phase-conjugate mirror,” Opt. Express 14(22), 10657–10662 ( 2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,11

11. T. Omatsu, K. Nawata, M. Okida, and K. Furuki, “MW ps pulse generation at sub-MHz repetition rates from a phase conjugate Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier,” Opt. Express 15(15), 9123–9128 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Our system has the potential to be utilized in the above-mentioned applications.

In this present paper, we describe power scaling of a picosecond PC-MOPA system by cascading the phase-conjugate output to a second Nd:YVO4 power amplifier. We also investigate the thermal effects in the second amplifier at various external incident angles with a view to minimizing degradation of the beam quality of the output from the second power amplifier. Using this system, 80.5 W picosecond output with a beam propagation factor of M2 < 1.8 was demonstrated at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 100 MHz. Generation of high-intensity megahertz pulses with peak powers of 7.4 MW and an average power of 78.5 W was also demonstrated by using a pulse picker formed from a rubidium titanyl phosphate (RTP) Pockels cell.

2. Experiments

2.1 PC-MOPA system

The output pulses from the master laser were selected to have a PRF of 1.0 MHz by an external electro-optical modulator (EOM) synchronized with the pulses from the master laser. The master laser beam was focused to an elliptical spot by two cylindrical lenses, HCL1 (f = 500 mm) and VCL (f = 100 mm), and it was then injected into the amplifier. This arrangement assured good spatial overlap between the master laser beam and the ellipsoidal gain volume in the amplifier. The powers of the master laser beam injected into the amplifier were respectively fixed to 12 and 2 mW at PRFs of 100 and 1.0 MHz to ensure that no depoling of the Rh:BaTiO3 crystal occurred [12

12. L. Lombard, A. Brignon, J. P. Huignard, E. Lallier, G. Lucas-Leclin, P. Georges, G. Pauliat, and G. Roosen, “Diffraction-limited polarized emission from a multimode ytterbium fiber amplifier after a nonlinear beam converter,” Opt. Lett. 29(9), 989–991 ( 2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

The amplified master laser beam was retroreflected by 4f imaging optics formed by two mirrors and a spherical lens L (f = 100 mm) causing it to re-enter the amplifier. The external incident angles of the master laser beam and the amplified beam relative to the pump surface were 16° and 19°, respectively.

The amplified beam emerging from the amplifier was collimated by the two cylindrical lenses, VCL1 (f = 100 mm) and HCL2 (f = 200 mm), and it was then directed toward a Rh:BaTiO3 crystal [13

13. N. V. Bogodaev, L. I. Ivleva, A. S. Korshunov, A. V. Mamaev, N. N. Polozkov, and A. A. Zozulya, “Geometry of a self-pumped passive ring mirror in crystals with strong fanning,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 10(6), 1054–1059 ( 1993). [CrossRef]

,14

14. N. Huot, J. M. C. Jonathan, G. Roosen, and D. Rytz, “Characterization and optimization of a ring self-pumped phase-conjugate mirror at 1.06 μm with BaTiO3:Rh,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15(7), 1992–1999 ( 1998). [CrossRef]

] by relay optics formed by two cylindrical lenses, HCL3 (f = 200 mm) and HCL4 (f = 75 mm). The polarization of the amplified beam was rotated using a half-wave plate HWP2 so that it lay in the extraordinary plane of the Rh:BaTiO3 crystal in order to achieve effective phase conjugation. The phase conjugate of the amplified beam was automatically fed-back to the amplifier. To prevent feedback to the master laser, an optical isolator was formed by a polarizing beam splitter (PBS), a Faraday rotator (FR), and a half-wave plate (HWP). In this manner, the phase conjugate beam, after passing twice through the amplifier, was ejected as output by the PBS.

The photorefractive crystal used was a 1000-ppm Rh-ion-doped BaTiO3 crystal with dimensions of 8 mm × 7 mm × 8 mm; it was 0°-cut to the normal to the c-axis. The crystal surfaces were AR-coated for 1 μm to reduce surface reflection loss. The temperature of the crystal mount was maintained at ~20 °C. A ring phase-conjugate mirror was formed by the BaTiO3 crystal and an external loop that contained a 4f imaging lens (f = 150 mm). The external loop angle was 15° and the loop was 600 mm long. Using this system, phase conjugation built up within a couple of minutes and it had a typical reflectivity of ~50%.

Figure 2
Fig. 2 Red circles are experimental output powers as a function of the pump power at PRF of 100 MHz. Blue circles are output powers at PRF of 1MHz.
shows the average output power in the PC-MOPA system as a function of the pump power. When the PRF was fixed to 100 MHz and the EOM was switched off, a maximum output power of 27.9 W was achieved at a pump power of 95 W. When the EOM was turned on, the laser started to operate at a PRF of 1 MHz. The actual input power to the amplifier was only ~2 mW. The amplifier in the PC-MOPA system was saturated even with such a weak input, and the output power reached 25.6 W at the maximum pump power.

The output from the system exhibited a near Gaussian spatial profile, and its corresponding beam-propagation factor, M 2, was <1.5, while the M 2 of the incident amplified beam on the phase-conjugate mirror was ~3.1. These results indicate that the system compensates for thermal distortions inside the amplifier.

2.2 Cascading PC-MOPA output to second power amplifier

We combined a second power amplifier based on a side-diode-pumped 1 at.% Nd:YVO4 slab with the PC-MOPA system [15

15. T. Omatsu, K. Nawata, D. Sauder, A. Minassian, and M. J. Damzen, “Over 40-watt diffraction-limited Q-switched output from neodymium-doped YAG ceramic bounce amplifiers,” Opt. Express 14(18), 8198–8204 ( 2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Figure 3
Fig. 3 Schematic diagram of the experimental setup of the second power amplifier.
shows a schematic diagram of this system. The pump power in the PC-MOPA system was fixed at 95 W. The slab used for the second amplifier was identical to that used for the PC-MOPA system. The second amplifier was also pumped by a fast-axis collimated CW diode array stack. To reduce the thermal lens in the second amplifier, the pump diode output was loosely focused by a cylindrical lens with a long focal length (CLD2, f = 50 mm) onto the pump face.

The output from the PC-MOPA was focused by a cylindrical lens, VCL2 (f = 200 mm), to be an elliptical spot with dimensions of 0.5 mm × 1.5 mm, and it was cascaded to the second amplifier. The power injected into the second amplifier was sufficiently high (~21 W) to saturate it, resulting in highly efficient power extraction from the second amplifier. To prevent severe distortion of the amplified wavefront [12

12. L. Lombard, A. Brignon, J. P. Huignard, E. Lallier, G. Lucas-Leclin, P. Georges, G. Pauliat, and G. Roosen, “Diffraction-limited polarized emission from a multimode ytterbium fiber amplifier after a nonlinear beam converter,” Opt. Lett. 29(9), 989–991 ( 2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], we made the incident angle of the output from the PC-MOPA relatively large relative to the pump surface of the second amplifier (~23°).

Figure 4
Fig. 4 Red circles indicate the experimentally measured average output power as a function of the pump power at a PRF of 100 MHz. Blue open and filled circles also show the average powers with and without prepulses at a PRF of 1MHz.
shows the measured output power from the second amplifier as a function of pump power. The PRF, first, was fixed to be 100 MHz. A maximum output power of 80.5 W was obtained at a pump power of ~135 W, and the corresponding gain of the second amplifier was estimated to be ~2.9. An extraction efficiency of >40% was measured in the second amplifier. Figure 5(a)
Fig. 5 (a) Blue and red curves are the intensity autocorrelation traces of the PC-MOPA output and amplified output from the second amplifier, respectively. (b) The temporal evolution of the output at the PRF of 100 MHz.
shows an intensity autocorrelation trace of the output. The output from the second amplifier had a pulse width of 9.2 ps for a Gaussian-shaped pulse, while the output from the PC-MOPA exhibited a pulse duration (FWHM) of 7.6 ps. This slight pulse broadening is induced by saturation effects due to the finite gain band (~1 nm) of the amplifier. The temporal evolution of the output is shown in Fig. 5(b). The standard deviation of the peak power fluctuations in the output was estimated to be ~1%.

We also measured the temporal behaviors of average power of the output from the system during a long observation time. The pump power was fixed to 135 W. As shown in Fig. 6
Fig. 6 Temporal evolution of average power of the output from the second amplifier at the maximum pump power. (a) Experimental average power measured at intervals of 0.5 second.. (b) Measured average power over 35 minutes at 15 second intervals.
, the system exhibited excellent temporal stability, and the standard deviations of the fluctuations in average power of the output over 35 minutes was estimated to be < 1%. The output from the second amplifier had a near Gaussian spatial profile in the far-field (Fig. 7
Fig. 7 The spatial profile of the output beam from the second amplifier.
), and its horizontal beam-propagation factor, M 2, was <1.8.

3. Discussion

To estimate the phase aberration in the horizontal direction in the second amplifier, we numerically simulated the phase distribution in the second amplifier by using a conventional heat diffusion equation [16

16. J. C. Bermudez, V. J. Pinto-Robledo, A. V. Kir’yanov, and M. J. Damzen, “The thermo-lensing effect in a grazing incidence, diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser,” Opt. Commun. 210(1-2), 75–82 ( 2002). [CrossRef]

,17

17. X. Yan, M. Gong, F. He, Q. Liu, X. Fu, and D. Wang, “Numerical modeling of the thermal lensing effect in a grazing-incidence laser,” Opt. Commun. 282(9), 1851–1857 ( 2009). [CrossRef]

]. We assumed that the thermal load in the amplifier was mainly induced by the energy quantum defect between the pump and laser photons, and the heat in the pump region (18 × 0.3 mm2) on the slab was removed by conduction cooling on the top and bottom faces (20 × 5 mm2) of the slab. Figure 9
Fig. 9 Numerically simulated model of the phase shift of the bounce amplifier. ΔT is the temperature distribution.
shows the numerically simulated model.

The spatial distribution of the phase shift that the injected beam with a beam size of ~1.5 mm experienced in the second amplifier at various external incident angles θ is also shown in Fig. 9. It was found by integrating the phase shift, defined as the product of the temperature rise and the thermo-optic coefficient dn/dT (3.0 × 10−6/K) [18

18. M. Okida, A. Tonouchi, M. Itoh, T. Yatagai, and T. Omatsu, “Thermal-lens measurement in a side-pumped 1.3 mm Nd:YVO4 bounce laser,” Opt. Commun. 277(1), 125–129 ( 2007). [CrossRef]

], along the optical axis x’.

As the external incident angle to the second amplifier increases, the effective aberrations decrease significantly. Above an external angle of 23°, the phase difference between the maxima and minima values is less than 0.3 rad (λ/10), so that the amplified output does not affect phase aberration. There is a good consistency between the simulations and experiments.

4 Conclusions

We investigated power scaling in a phase-conjugate Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier by using a cascaded diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier geometry. Average output powers of 80.5 and 78.5 W were achieved at PRFs of 100 and 1 MHz, respectively. The corresponding peak power at a PRF of 1 MHz was 7.4 MW. The overall power extraction efficiency of the whole system was >35%. The standard deviation of the peak power fluctuations in the output was measured to be <2%. And the temporal stability of the output during a long observation time of 35 minutes also had the fluctuations of 0.5%. To the best of our knowledge, these values are the highest obtained using a bounce amplifier in combination with a phase-conjugate mirror in the picosecond regime. The output exhibited a pulse duration (FWHM) of 9.2 ps and a M 2 of <1.8. Further power scaling up to >100 W should be possible by optimizing the pump diodes (for example, by using 880-nm pump diodes to reducing the heat loading in the amplifier).

Acknowledgement

The authors acknowledge support from a Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid (19018007, 18360031) from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

References and links

1.

L. McDonagh, R. Wallenstein, and A. Nebel, “111 W, 110 MHz repetition-rate, passively mode-locked TEM00Nd:YVO4 master oscillator power amplifier pumped at 888 nm,” Opt. Lett. 32(10), 1259–1261 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

S. Tokita, J. Kawanaka, Y. Izawa, M. Fujita, and T. Kawashima, “23.7-W picosecond cryogenic-Yb:YAG multipass amplifier,” Opt. Express 15(7), 3955–3961 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

M. Siebold, M. Hornung, J. Hein, G. Paunescu, R. Sauerbrey, T. Bergmann, and G. Hollemann, “A high-average-power diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative laser amplifier for picosecond-pulses,” Appl. Phys. B 78, 387–390 ( 2004). [CrossRef]

4.

J. Kleinbauer, R. Knappe, and R. Wallenstein, “A powerful diode-pumped laser source for micro-machining with ps pulses in the infrared, the visible and the ultraviolet,” Appl. Phys. B 80(3), 315–320 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

5.

A. Agnesi, L. Carra, F. Pirzio, G. Reali, A. Tomaselli, D. Scarpa, and C. Vacchi, “Amplification of a low-power picosecond Nd:YVO4 laser by a diode-laser, side-pumped, grazing-incidence slab amplifier,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 42(8), 772–776 ( 2006). [CrossRef]

6.

G. Smith, P. C. Shardlow, and M. J. Damzen, “High-power near-diffraction-limited solid-state amplified spontaneous emission laser devices,” Opt. Lett. 32(13), 1911–1913 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

A. Minassian, B. A. Thompson, G. Smith, and M. J. Damzen, “High-power scaling (>100 W) of a diode-pumped TEM00 Nd:GdVO4 laser system,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11(3), 621–625 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

8.

N. Shiba, Y. Morimoto, K. Furuki, Y. Tanaka, K. Nawata, M. Okida, and T. Omatsu, “Picosecond master-oscillator, power-amplifier system based on a mixed vanadate phase conjugate bounce amplifier,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16382–16389 ( 2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

Y. Ojima, K. Nawata, and T. Omatsu, “Over 10-watt picosecond diffraction-limited output from a Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a phase conjugate mirror,” Opt. Express 13(22), 8993–8998 ( 2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [PubMed]

10.

K. Nawata, Y. Ojima, M. Okida, T. Ogawa, and T. Omatsu, “Power scaling of a pico-second Nd:YVO(4) master-oscillator power amplifier with a phase-conjugate mirror,” Opt. Express 14(22), 10657–10662 ( 2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

T. Omatsu, K. Nawata, M. Okida, and K. Furuki, “MW ps pulse generation at sub-MHz repetition rates from a phase conjugate Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier,” Opt. Express 15(15), 9123–9128 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

L. Lombard, A. Brignon, J. P. Huignard, E. Lallier, G. Lucas-Leclin, P. Georges, G. Pauliat, and G. Roosen, “Diffraction-limited polarized emission from a multimode ytterbium fiber amplifier after a nonlinear beam converter,” Opt. Lett. 29(9), 989–991 ( 2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

N. V. Bogodaev, L. I. Ivleva, A. S. Korshunov, A. V. Mamaev, N. N. Polozkov, and A. A. Zozulya, “Geometry of a self-pumped passive ring mirror in crystals with strong fanning,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 10(6), 1054–1059 ( 1993). [CrossRef]

14.

N. Huot, J. M. C. Jonathan, G. Roosen, and D. Rytz, “Characterization and optimization of a ring self-pumped phase-conjugate mirror at 1.06 μm with BaTiO3:Rh,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15(7), 1992–1999 ( 1998). [CrossRef]

15.

T. Omatsu, K. Nawata, D. Sauder, A. Minassian, and M. J. Damzen, “Over 40-watt diffraction-limited Q-switched output from neodymium-doped YAG ceramic bounce amplifiers,” Opt. Express 14(18), 8198–8204 ( 2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

J. C. Bermudez, V. J. Pinto-Robledo, A. V. Kir’yanov, and M. J. Damzen, “The thermo-lensing effect in a grazing incidence, diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser,” Opt. Commun. 210(1-2), 75–82 ( 2002). [CrossRef]

17.

X. Yan, M. Gong, F. He, Q. Liu, X. Fu, and D. Wang, “Numerical modeling of the thermal lensing effect in a grazing-incidence laser,” Opt. Commun. 282(9), 1851–1857 ( 2009). [CrossRef]

18.

M. Okida, A. Tonouchi, M. Itoh, T. Yatagai, and T. Omatsu, “Thermal-lens measurement in a side-pumped 1.3 mm Nd:YVO4 bounce laser,” Opt. Commun. 277(1), 125–129 ( 2007). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(140.3280) Lasers and laser optics : Laser amplifiers
(140.3580) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, solid-state
(190.5040) Nonlinear optics : Phase conjugation
(320.5390) Ultrafast optics : Picosecond phenomena

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: September 8, 2009
Revised Manuscript: October 27, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: October 27, 2009
Published: October 29, 2009

Citation
K. Nawata, M. Okida, K. Furuki, K. Miyamoto, and T. Omatsu, "Sub-100 W picosecond output from a phase-conjugate Nd:YVO4 bounce amplifier," Opt. Express 17, 20816-20823 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-23-20816


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. L. McDonagh, R. Wallenstein, and A. Nebel, “111 W, 110 MHz repetition-rate, passively mode-locked TEM00Nd:YVO4 master oscillator power amplifier pumped at 888 nm,” Opt. Lett. 32(10), 1259–1261 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. S. Tokita, J. Kawanaka, Y. Izawa, M. Fujita, and T. Kawashima, “23.7-W picosecond cryogenic-Yb:YAG multipass amplifier,” Opt. Express 15(7), 3955–3961 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. M. Siebold, M. Hornung, J. Hein, G. Paunescu, R. Sauerbrey, T. Bergmann, and G. Hollemann, “A high-average-power diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative laser amplifier for picosecond-pulses,” Appl. Phys. B 78, 387–390 (2004). [CrossRef]
  4. J. Kleinbauer, R. Knappe, and R. Wallenstein, “A powerful diode-pumped laser source for micro-machining with ps pulses in the infrared, the visible and the ultraviolet,” Appl. Phys. B 80(3), 315–320 (2005). [CrossRef]
  5. A. Agnesi, L. Carra, F. Pirzio, G. Reali, A. Tomaselli, D. Scarpa, and C. Vacchi, “Amplification of a low-power picosecond Nd:YVO4 laser by a diode-laser, side-pumped, grazing-incidence slab amplifier,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 42(8), 772–776 (2006). [CrossRef]
  6. G. Smith, P. C. Shardlow, and M. J. Damzen, “High-power near-diffraction-limited solid-state amplified spontaneous emission laser devices,” Opt. Lett. 32(13), 1911–1913 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. A. Minassian, B. A. Thompson, G. Smith, and M. J. Damzen, “High-power scaling (>100 W) of a diode-pumped TEM00 Nd:GdVO4 laser system,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 11(3), 621–625 (2005). [CrossRef]
  8. N. Shiba, Y. Morimoto, K. Furuki, Y. Tanaka, K. Nawata, M. Okida, and T. Omatsu, “Picosecond master-oscillator, power-amplifier system based on a mixed vanadate phase conjugate bounce amplifier,” Opt. Express 16(21), 16382–16389 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. Y. Ojima, K. Nawata, and T. Omatsu, “Over 10-watt picosecond diffraction-limited output from a Nd:YVO4 slab amplifier with a phase conjugate mirror,” Opt. Express 13(22), 8993–8998 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. K. Nawata, Y. Ojima, M. Okida, T. Ogawa, and T. Omatsu, “Power scaling of a pico-second Nd:YVO(4) master-oscillator power amplifier with a phase-conjugate mirror,” Opt. Express 14(22), 10657–10662 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. T. Omatsu, K. Nawata, M. Okida, and K. Furuki, “MW ps pulse generation at sub-MHz repetition rates from a phase conjugate Nd:YVO(4) bounce amplifier,” Opt. Express 15(15), 9123–9128 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. L. Lombard, A. Brignon, J. P. Huignard, E. Lallier, G. Lucas-Leclin, P. Georges, G. Pauliat, and G. Roosen, “Diffraction-limited polarized emission from a multimode ytterbium fiber amplifier after a nonlinear beam converter,” Opt. Lett. 29(9), 989–991 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. N. V. Bogodaev, L. I. Ivleva, A. S. Korshunov, A. V. Mamaev, N. N. Polozkov, and A. A. Zozulya, “Geometry of a self-pumped passive ring mirror in crystals with strong fanning,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 10(6), 1054–1059 (1993). [CrossRef]
  14. N. Huot, J. M. C. Jonathan, G. Roosen, and D. Rytz, “Characterization and optimization of a ring self-pumped phase-conjugate mirror at 1.06 μm with BaTiO3:Rh,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15(7), 1992–1999 (1998). [CrossRef]
  15. T. Omatsu, K. Nawata, D. Sauder, A. Minassian, and M. J. Damzen, “Over 40-watt diffraction-limited Q-switched output from neodymium-doped YAG ceramic bounce amplifiers,” Opt. Express 14(18), 8198–8204 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. J. C. Bermudez, V. J. Pinto-Robledo, A. V. Kir’yanov, and M. J. Damzen, “The thermo-lensing effect in a grazing incidence, diode-side-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser,” Opt. Commun. 210(1-2), 75–82 (2002). [CrossRef]
  17. X. Yan, M. Gong, F. He, Q. Liu, X. Fu, and D. Wang, “Numerical modeling of the thermal lensing effect in a grazing-incidence laser,” Opt. Commun. 282(9), 1851–1857 (2009). [CrossRef]
  18. M. Okida, A. Tonouchi, M. Itoh, T. Yatagai, and T. Omatsu, “Thermal-lens measurement in a side-pumped 1.3 mm Nd:YVO4 bounce laser,” Opt. Commun. 277(1), 125–129 (2007). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited