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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 24 — Nov. 23, 2009
  • pp: 21712–21722
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Direct observation of lateral photovoltaic effect in nano-metal-films

C. Q. Yu, H. Wang, S. Q. Xiao, and Y. X. Xia  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 24, pp. 21712-21722 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.021712


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Abstract

Lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) observed on the metal films is unusual because it violates a principle that the LPEs are always observed on the surface of a semiconductor. Compared with early studies, we have realized an obvious metal film LPE in a metal-semiconductor (MS) structure. By further arguing with experimental results, this work also intensively elucidates many features of LPE which the early models never touched upon. All the data and analyses in this study indicate that metal side LPE in MS structure has some natural superiorities to the semiconductor side LPE and may open many exciting opportunities for realizing multifunctional devices.

© 2009 OSA

1. Introduction

The lateral photovoltaic effect (LPE) is an attributive character of some semiconductor structures and can be always observed on semiconductor surface. Due to its output of lateral photovoltage (LPV) changing with light spot position linearly, this effect can be used in position-sensitive detectors (PSDs) which can detect very small displacement. In general, LPE is mechanically deduced from the lateral diffused flow and recombination of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs (EHPs) away from the point of incident radiation. Since the LPE effect was first discovered by Schottky and later expanded upon by Wallmark in floating Ge p-n junctions in 1957 [1

1. J. T. Wallmark, “A new semiconductor photocell using lateral photoeffect,” Proc. IRE 45, 474–483 (1957).

], it was boosted very quickly in many different semiconductor systems, such as Ti/Si amorphous superlattices [2

2. R. H. Willens, “Photoelectronic and electronic properties of Ti/Si amorphous superlattices,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 49(11), 663–665 ( 1986). [CrossRef]

5

5. R. H. Willens, B. F. Levine, C. G. Bethea, and D. Brasen, “High resolution photovoltaic position sensing with Ti/Si superlattices,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 49(24), 1647–1648 ( 1986). [CrossRef]

], modulation-doped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures [6

6. N. Tabatabaie, M. H. Meynadier, R. E. Nahory, J. P. Harbison, and L. T. Florez, “Large lateral photovoltaic effect in modulation-doped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 55(8), 792 ( 1989). [CrossRef]

], hydrogenated amorphous silicon Schottky Barrier structures [7

7. J. Henry and J. Livingstone, “A comparative study of position-sensitive detectors based on Schottky barrier crystalline and amorphous silicon structures,” J. Mater. Sci. Mater. Electron. 12(7), 387–393 ( 2001). [CrossRef]

], and perovskite materials [8

8. K.-J. Jin, K. Zhao, H.-B. Lu, L. Liao, and G.-Z. Yang, “Dember effect induced photovoltage in perovskite p-n heterojunctions,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 91(8), 081906 ( 2007). [CrossRef]

]. Recent research shows that the LPE can also be observed in some metal-semiconductor (MS) structures [9

9. D. Kabra, Th. B. Singh, and K. S. Narayan, “Semiconducting-polymer-based position-sensitive detectors,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85(21), 5073 ( 2004). [CrossRef]

12

12. S. Q. Xiao, H. Wang, Z. C. Zhao, and Y. X. Xia, “Large lateral photoeffect observed in metal-semiconductor junctions of CoxMnyO films and Si,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 40(18), 5580–5583 ( 2007). [CrossRef]

]. This is interesting because MS structure has been treated as solar cell for many decades [13

13. H. C. Card and E. H. Rhoderick, “Studies of tunnel MOS diodes I. Interface effects in silicon Schottky diodes,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 4(10), 1589–1601 ( 1971). [CrossRef]

18

18. A. Kumar, M. D. Rosenblum, D. L. Gilmore, B. J. Tufts, M. L. Rosenbluth, and N. S. Lewis, “Fabrication of minority-carrier-limited n-Si/insulator/metal diodes,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 56(19), 1919–1921 ( 1990). [CrossRef]

]. The MS structure serving as LPE device is pretty new. The present understanding of operation mechanism of LPE in MS structure is similar to that of a MS solar cell, which utilizes the transverse photovoltaic effect (TPE) due to the Schottky barrier formed (SB) at the interface between the metal film and semiconductor.

When light uniformly illuminates a MS (say n-type semiconductor) junction, electron–hole pairs are generated inside the semiconductor within the minority-carrier diffusion length of the depletion region. The minority holes in the depletion region are swept into the metallic film by the Schottky field with electrons remaining in the n-region. This leads to the development of a transverse photovoltage, as is observed in a MS or MOS solar cell. If now the light impinges at one point on the surface, the presence of the excess remaining electrons and injected holes will give rise to a non-equilibrium distribution because of all the other points on the film surface without any illumination, generating a gradient between the illuminated and the non-illuminated zones. So the excess majority carriers in the metallic layer and the Si layer move laterally away from the illuminated spot. If the lateral distance of the laser spot from each electrode is different, then the quantity of the collected carriers at the two contacts is different. A lateral field is therefore set up, as well as the LPV. Ideally, there should be a linear relationship between the LPV output and the position of the light spot.

We must stress here, though LPEs in MS structures are obvious, the LPEs are mostly observed in semiconductor side. The observed metal side LPEs in early studies were always negligibly small due to the shorting effect. In fact, metal side LPE is very sensitive to the metal film thickness. In particular, when the metal film thickness is reduced to nano-scale, the metal film LPE can become very obvious. This has been confirmed by our recent preliminary studies in similar structures of Co/SiO2/Si, Co/Mn/Co/c-Si and Co3Mn2O/Si [19

19. S. Q. Xiao, H. Wang, C. Q. Yu, Y. X. Xia, J. J. Lu, Q. Y. Jin, and Z. H. Wang, “A novel position-sensitive detector based on metal–oxide–semiconductor structures of Co–SiO2–Si,” N. J. Phys. 10(3), 033018 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

22

22. L. Z. Kong, H. Wang, S. Q. Xiao, J. J. Lu, Y. X. Xia, G. J. Hu, N. Dai, and Z. H. Wang, “Integrated properties of large lateral photovoltage and positive magnetoresistance in Co/Mn/Co/c-Si structures,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 41(5), 052003 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

]. However, few people could be aware of this in their early studies and understood that this phenomenon widely exists in a variety of MS structures. In fact, the importance of metal film LPE is not only the obvious LPE. It may open opportunities for multifunctional PSD devices if the metal’s properties can be added in the metal film LPEs. This means the LPE can potentially coexist with other metal physical properties, such as thermal conductivity or even superconductivity. For example, we have realized a coexistence of LPE and magnetoresistance in our recent works [20

20. H. Wang, S. Q. Xiao, C. Q. Yu, Y. X. Xia, Q. Y. Jin, and Z. H. Wang, “Correlation of magnetoresistance and lateral photovoltage in Co3Mn2O/SiO2/Si metal–oxide–semiconductor structure,” N. J. Phys. 10(9), 093006 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

,22

22. L. Z. Kong, H. Wang, S. Q. Xiao, J. J. Lu, Y. X. Xia, G. J. Hu, N. Dai, and Z. H. Wang, “Integrated properties of large lateral photovoltage and positive magnetoresistance in Co/Mn/Co/c-Si structures,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 41(5), 052003 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

]. Therefore, this characteristic allows the LPE to develop to its full potential in more applications, such as biomedical applications, robotics, astronautics, process control and position information systems, possibly even in magnetic storage.

In this context, a variety of metals have been used in the MS structures in order to manifest this phenomenon is prevalent among the most of metals. Interestingly enough, each metal and semiconductor we used in our experiments is hardly to produce any LPE, but their combination can create an obvious one. This is because the electrons excited by light in the semiconductor can be easily introduced to the metal film in this kind of structure, resulting in an effective separation from holes. This will reduce the possibility of recombination. In the meanwhile, the electrons can diffuse much longer distance in the metal film than it does in the semiconductor. These two factors are great important for an obvious LPE. Based on these ideas, we put forward a new model which contains more parameters affecting the LPE. Although early models based on SB still remain challenging in qualitatively describing the LPE in some conventional semiconductor structures, it is incapable to quantitatively explain the MS LPE, especially in explanation of thickness effect of metal side LPE.

2. Experimental results

The metal films with a variety of thicknesses are all grown on n-type Si(111) (20 mm × 5 mm rectangles) by dc sputtering at room temperature. The thickness of the substrates is around 0.3 mm and the resistivity of the substrates is in the range of 50-80□Ωcm at room temperature. In this paper, to concentrate our discussion on MS LPE, we only choose three kinds of metal of Ti, Co, Cu as control samples at a typical metal thickness of 6.2 nm because, at this thickness, Ti/Si structure has the strongest LPE. All the samples were scanned spatially with an He-Ne laser (3mW and 632 nm) focused on a roughly 50 μm diameter spot at the surface and without any spurious illumination (e.g. background light) reaching the samples, and all the contacts (less than 1mm in diameter) to the films were formed by alloying indium and showed no measurable rectifying behavior (very perfect ohmic contact).

The typical transverse Schottky barrier (SB) I-V characteristics of Ti(Co, Cu)/Si metal-semiconductor structures were measured with a pulse-modulated current source. As shown in Fig. 1
Fig. 1 (Color online) (Color online) The transverse I-V curves of Ti/Si, Co/Si, and Cu/Si structures. The inset shows the schematic circuit of the sample measurement.
, all the results exhibit good nonlinearity and rectifying current-voltage behavior, demonstrating that the Ti(Co, Cu)/Si structures in this study can fully develop a Schottky barrier, which is main feature of the ordinary metal-semiconductor junctions.

3. Band Model of LPE

By far, the well accepted models on LPE are so called Dember Effect [23

23. J. I. Pankove, Optical Processes in Semiconductors 14, 320 ( 1971).

] and PN junction mechanism [24

24. H. Niu, T. Matsuda, H. Sadamatsu, and M. Takai, “Application of Lateral Photovoltaic Effect to the Measurement of the Physical Quantities of P-N Junctions—Sheet Resistivity and Junction Conductance of N2+ Implanted Si,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 12, 4 ( 1976).

]. Though these models can explain some simple LPE phenomena, they are incapable of explaining our experimental results in many aspects. To fully understand this metal side LPE, we therefore establish a new model based on the energy band in the MS structure. With this model, we cannot only quantitatively explain why metal side LPE can be better than semiconductor side LPE, but also give some crucial factors which determine the metal side LPE.

Generally, when a metal film is attached to the semiconductor, a schottky potential will exist in the MS structure in order to correlate two Fermi levels which we define as EF0. However, when a laser is nonuniformly incident onto the structure, as shown in Fig. 3
Fig. 3 (Color online) The schematic electron motion profile in MS structure illuminated by a light spot. The red arrows represent the direction of electron movement.
, the equilibrium state is broken and the electrons in the valence band at light position (position 1 in Fig. 3) will be exited to the conduction band, the number of which we defined as n(0). Soon these electrons will transit to the metal film (position 1’) where the electrons can easily transmit, the number of which we defined as N(0). A short time after that, these N(0) electrons in the metal film will spread toward two sides (position 2’ and 3′) according to the diffusion equation Dmd2N(r)dr2=N(r)τm. Thus the distribution of the number of electrons in the metal film can be calculated asN(r)=N(0)exp(rλm), in which r is the distance from light spot position and λm is the electron diffusion length in the metal film. To finish a circulation, these light-induced electrons in the metal will transit back to the semiconductor at non-illumination position (position 2 and 3), the number of which we define as n(r), and then go back to their starting position (position 1). If a light keeps illuminating, the circulation will continue and a stable photovoltage distribution can thus be formed in the metal film. Please note the reason why we don’t discuss the holes motion here is that the diffusion length of the holes in the semiconductor side is negligibly small, and meaningless in the metal side.

Using the diffusion length equation in bulk semiconductor, the electron diffusion length in the metal film can be similarly written as

λm=Dmτm=3kBTτm8πq2ρm(2mEF02)32
(1)

Figure 4
Fig. 4 (Color online) The schematic energy band profile in MS structure illuminated by a light. The red lines represent the Fermi levels, and the gray (and black) part represents the equilibrium (non-equilibrium) electrons. Please note, the Fermi level at position 2’ (or 2) has a decisive influence on LPV in the metal (or semiconductor) side.
is the schematic energy band profile in MS structure illuminated by a light. We can clearly see that the Fermi levels at four typical positions (position 1, 1’, 2, 2’) are different due to the light illumination, in which the electrons will move towards the lower Fermi levels. Thus the metal side LPV can be obtained by calculating the difference of Fermi level between position 2’ (A) and 3′ (B) in Fig. 3.

LPVm=EFm(r)EFm(r)q=KmN(0)[exp(|Lx|λm)exp(|L+x|λm)]
(2)

HereKm=14πqEF012(22m)32, L=|AB|2 is the half distance between A and B, and x is the light position, as shown in Fig. 3.

When the light spot moves outside the region between contact A and B (for example x>L), the LPV will decreases exponentially with x and can be written asLPVm=KmN(0)exp(xLλm). By measuring the relationship between LPV and x from experimental curves shown in Fig. 2(a), the electron diffusion length λm (which is the exponential coefficient) can be obtained. Actually, this provides a method to detect electron diffusion length in the metal film. Obviously, in the experiments as shown in Fig. 2(a), we easily obtain that λm = 2.8 mm for Ti/Si, λm = 3.1 mm for Co/Si and λm = 3.4 mm for Cu/Si. Please note, λm will increase rapidly with the increase of the metal thickness, which results in shorting effect in the metal. This is why the LPE appears obvious in the metal film only at the thickness around several nanometers.

When the light spot moves back and forth inside the region between contacts A and B (L<x<L), the LPV isLPVm=KmN(0)[exp(Lxλm)exp(L+xλm)]. If light spot position satisfy |x|<<λm(In fact, this condition can be easily met. For example, in our experiment,|x|L=1.6mm<λm, as shown in Fig. 2(a)), the LPVm can be idealized as

LPVm=2KmN(0)λmexp(Lλm)x
(3)

Similarly, the lateral photovoltage in the semiconductor side can be also obtained by calculating the difference of Fermi level between position 2 and 3 in Fig. 3.

LPVs=2KsN(0)λsexp(Lλs)x
(4)

HereKs=kBTn0, in which λs is the electron diffusion length in the semiconductor and n0 is the number of electrons in the conduction band due to temperature fluctuation. Similarly, we can also get λs(Ti/Si) = 1.9 mm, λs(Co/Si) = 2.3 mm and λs(Cu/Si) = 2.5 mm from Fig. 2(b).

4. Superiority of nonlinearity of metal side over semiconductor side

Nonlinearity of metal side LPE strongly depends on the distance of two contacts. It deteriorates in condition of L>λm, as shown in Fig. 5(a)
Fig. 5 (Color online) (a) The experimental results of LPE in the metal side of Ti/Si structure, in which the distances between AB ( = 2L) are 2.4 mm, 3.2mm, 4.0 mm, 5.0 mm and 6.0 mm, respectively. (b) The case of L = 3.0 mm. (c) Experimental and theoretical results of sensitivities and nonlinerities in Ti/Si structure with different L. (d) The specific data of the experiments.
. This is because, in this case, precondition |x|<<λm of Eq. (3) is no longer satisfied for the whole region between A and B, then the lateral photovoltage is no longer linear with the light spot position. The perfect linearity can only be achieved in the case of short contacts’ distance. Ignoring error of measurement, the nonlinearity mainly originates from inherent nonlinear result caused by the long contacts’ distance. For a fixed L, the nonlinearity δm is also fixed and can be obtained by simply comparing the LPV with the idealized LPV, as shown in Fig. 5(b).

Nonlinearitymδm2×rms deviationMeasured full scale=137(Lλm)2
(5)

Similarly, the nonlinearity of LPE in the semiconductor side can be written as

Nonlinearitysδs=137(Lλs)2
(6)

For a fixed L, a crucial factor that influences the nonlinearity is λ which depends greatly on the material properties. According to Eq. (5) and Eq. (6), a long diffusion length will lead to a high linearity. We have known, in some cases, the electron in metal side possesses a longer λ than that in the semiconductor side. This is why the linearity of LPE in the metal side is better than that in the semiconductor side, as shown in Fig. 2. However, we do not expect an infinite diffusion length in the metal because of the above-mentioned shorting effect. Therefore, a proper diffusion length determined by the film thickness is important for metal side LPE. To substitute λm(Ti/Si) = 2.8 mm, λm(Co/Si) = 3.1 mm, λm(Cu/Si) = 3.4 mm and L = 1.6 mm into Eq. (5), we can easily get that δm(Ti/Si) = 4.1%, δm(Co/Si) = 3.4%, and δm(Cu/Si) = 2.9%. Also, if we substitute λs(Ti/Si) = 1.9 mm, λs(Co/Si) = 2.3 mm, λs(Cu/Si) = 2.9 mm and L = 1.6 mm into Eq. (6), we can easily get that δs(Ti/Si) = 8.9%, δs(Co/Si) = 6.1%, and δs(Cu/Si) = 5.2%. Comparing these calculated results with experimental results shown in Fig. 2, we can find that they are well consistent with each other.

5. Optimum contacts’ distance of metal side LPE

Equation (5) clears up a long standing issue about the relationship between linearity and contacts’ distance. Obviously, the linearity deteriorates when two contacts’ distance 2L is increased to some extent, which is consistent with the experimental results shown in Fig. 5(c). In this case, ie L becomes long enough, the nonlinearity less than a given δ0 can only be kept in a relatively small central area. We define the length of this area with a nonlinearity less than δ0 as R(L) (acceptable region), as shown in Fig. 5(b). To evaluate the linearity in whole region of 2L (R(L) is always less than 2L), we define a linear rateη=R(L)2L.We can clearly see from Fig. 5(d) that the linear rate will become worse when the contacts’ distance is increased (here we suppose the acceptable nonlinearity δ0 is 5%). Therefore we can define an optimum contacts’ distance 2Lopt as the longest distance of two contacts within which the linear rate keeps η=1. This means the optimum distance of two contacts is the biggest linear region within which the nonlinearity is less than δ0. We can easily find from Fig. 5(d) that the optimum distance of two contacts in our experiment is 3.2 mm. Also, we can obtain the theoretical result of optimum distance of two contacts by deducing the equation of2Lopt=R(Lopt). This equation can be established by simply replacing δ with δ0 in Eq. (5). Thus the Lopt can be written as

Lopt=37δ0λm
(7)

Clearly, the optimum distance of two contacts in metal side LPE is determined by the electron diffusion length in the film and the acceptable nonlinearity.

6. Superiority of sensitivity of metal side over semiconductor side

From Eq. (3) and Eq. (4), the sensitivity in the metal side and semiconductor side can be respectively written as

Sensitivitymκm=2KmN(0)λmexp(Lλm)
(8)
Sensitivitysκs=2KsN(0)λsexp(Lλs)
(9)

We can clearly see from Eq. (8) and Eq. (9) that a small L leads to a high sensitivity. To validate this mechanism, we compare the theoretical result according to Eq. (8) with our experimental result, as shown in Fig. 5(c), and find they are totally consistent with each other.

In order to make a comparison of sensitivity between metal side and semiconductor side, we compared Eq. (8) with Eq. (9) and obtain

SensitivitymSensitivitysκKmλsKsλm=CTλm
(10)

HereC=n0λs4πqkBEF012(22m)32. Obviously, the ratio of sensitivities in two sides depends on several physical parameters. For a given MS structure, this ratio mainly depends on the λm and T. That is to say the metal film thickness is crucial factor in determining the magnitude of metal side LPE because λm depends on film thickness. So it is very likely that the metal side LPE to surpass the semiconductor side LPE if we choose a suitable metal and control the film thickness within a proper range. This again supports our foregoing analysis. Interestingly, the temperature influences the LPE and reveals metal side LPE could behave more effectively than semiconductor side LPE in low temperature.

7. Crucial metal factors to the metal side LPE

In fact, the metal side sensitivity has a bearing on the properties of metal we used. Substituting Eq. (1) into Eq. (8), the sensitivity of metal side LPE can be written as

κmEF014ρm12
(11)

According to Eq. (11), we can clearly see that the resistivity and the Fermi level are the two crucial factors to the metal side LPE. The metal with higher resistivity and higher Fermi level can produce a higher sensitivity. Obviously, for the control metals of Ti, Co and Cu, Ti/Si presents the highest sensitivity while Cu/Si presents the lowest sensitivity. This is because Ti has the highest resistivity while Cu has the lowest resistivity as presented in Fig. 1. This result is totally consistent with the experimental result shown in Fig. 2(a). Interestingly, our result that higher resistivity metal film can obtain larger LPV is quite similar to the reported result that substrate with higher resistivity can obtain larger LPV [25

25. J. Henry and J. Livingstone, “Improved position sensitive detectors using high resistivity substrates,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 41(16), 165106 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

].

8. Thickness effect on metal side LPE

To further investigate the thickness effect of metal film on LPV in MS structure, we also measured the LPVs with different Ti thickness in Ti/Si structures, as shown in Fig. 6(a)
Fig. 6 (Color online) (a) Position sensitivities in metal side of Ti/Si structures as a function of metal thickness. (b) Schematic diagram of thickness effect on LPV at three typical thicknesses.
. We can clearly see that the position sensitivity of LPV in Ti/Si structure will decrease when the thickness of Ti is away from the optimum value of 6.2 nm. The thickness effect can be explained by the above diffusion model. We have clearly presented the relationship between resistivity and electron diffusion length in Eq. (1). Therefore, as shown in Fig. 6(b), if the metal film is very thick, then the electrons can easily diffuse from the light spot position toward two contacts because of the small resistivity, thus the density of electrons at two contacts are both high, resulting in a small difference of metallic potential between them, ie a small LPV. Similarly, if the metal film is very thin, the electrons can hardly diffuse because of the large resistivity, thus the density of electrons at two contacts are both low, also resulting a small difference of metallic potential between them, ie a small LPV. Therefore, in order to obtain a large difference of metallic potential between two contacts which is necessary for a large LPV in metal side, an appropriate metal thickness is crucial.

Based on the foregoing analyses, a quantitative explanation of the thickness effect can be easily given. Suppose the electrons diffusion length is proportional to the metal film thickness: then it can be written as λm=α(dmd0), where α is a proportional coefficient and d0 is the threshold thickness. Thus from Eq. (8), the position sensitivity of metal side LPV can be written as

κm(dm)=2KmN(0)α(dmd0)exp[Lα(dmd0)]
(12)

This result is well consistent with the experimental result, as shown in Fig. 6(a).

9. Conclusions

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge the financial support of National Nature Science Foundation (grant numbers 60776035 and 60378028) and support of National Minister of Education Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (PCSIRT).

References and links

1.

J. T. Wallmark, “A new semiconductor photocell using lateral photoeffect,” Proc. IRE 45, 474–483 (1957).

2.

R. H. Willens, “Photoelectronic and electronic properties of Ti/Si amorphous superlattices,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 49(11), 663–665 ( 1986). [CrossRef]

3.

B. F. Levine, R. H. Willens, C. G. Bethea, and D. Brasen, “Lateral photoeffect in thin amorphous superlattice films of Si and Ti grown on a Si substrate,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 49(22), 1537–1539 ( 1986). [CrossRef]

4.

B. F. Levine, R. H. Willens, C. G. Bethea, and D. Brasen, “Wavelength dependence of the lateral photovoltage in amorphous superlattice films of Si and Ti,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 49(23), 1608–1610 ( 1986). [CrossRef]

5.

R. H. Willens, B. F. Levine, C. G. Bethea, and D. Brasen, “High resolution photovoltaic position sensing with Ti/Si superlattices,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 49(24), 1647–1648 ( 1986). [CrossRef]

6.

N. Tabatabaie, M. H. Meynadier, R. E. Nahory, J. P. Harbison, and L. T. Florez, “Large lateral photovoltaic effect in modulation-doped AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 55(8), 792 ( 1989). [CrossRef]

7.

J. Henry and J. Livingstone, “A comparative study of position-sensitive detectors based on Schottky barrier crystalline and amorphous silicon structures,” J. Mater. Sci. Mater. Electron. 12(7), 387–393 ( 2001). [CrossRef]

8.

K.-J. Jin, K. Zhao, H.-B. Lu, L. Liao, and G.-Z. Yang, “Dember effect induced photovoltage in perovskite p-n heterojunctions,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 91(8), 081906 ( 2007). [CrossRef]

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S. Q. Xiao, H. Wang, Z. C. Zhao, and Y. X. Xia, “Large lateral photoeffect observed in metal-semiconductor junctions of CoxMnyO films and Si,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 40(18), 5580–5583 ( 2007). [CrossRef]

13.

H. C. Card and E. H. Rhoderick, “Studies of tunnel MOS diodes I. Interface effects in silicon Schottky diodes,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 4(10), 1589–1601 ( 1971). [CrossRef]

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19.

S. Q. Xiao, H. Wang, C. Q. Yu, Y. X. Xia, J. J. Lu, Q. Y. Jin, and Z. H. Wang, “A novel position-sensitive detector based on metal–oxide–semiconductor structures of Co–SiO2–Si,” N. J. Phys. 10(3), 033018 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

20.

H. Wang, S. Q. Xiao, C. Q. Yu, Y. X. Xia, Q. Y. Jin, and Z. H. Wang, “Correlation of magnetoresistance and lateral photovoltage in Co3Mn2O/SiO2/Si metal–oxide–semiconductor structure,” N. J. Phys. 10(9), 093006 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

21.

S. Q. Xiao, H. Wang, Z. C. Zhao, Y. Z. Gu, Y. X. Xia, and Z. H. Wang, “The Co-film-thickness dependent lateral photoeffect in Co-SiO2-Si metal-oxide-semiconductor structures,” Opt. Express 16(6), 3798–3806 ( 2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

L. Z. Kong, H. Wang, S. Q. Xiao, J. J. Lu, Y. X. Xia, G. J. Hu, N. Dai, and Z. H. Wang, “Integrated properties of large lateral photovoltage and positive magnetoresistance in Co/Mn/Co/c-Si structures,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 41(5), 052003 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

23.

J. I. Pankove, Optical Processes in Semiconductors 14, 320 ( 1971).

24.

H. Niu, T. Matsuda, H. Sadamatsu, and M. Takai, “Application of Lateral Photovoltaic Effect to the Measurement of the Physical Quantities of P-N Junctions—Sheet Resistivity and Junction Conductance of N2+ Implanted Si,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 12, 4 ( 1976).

25.

J. Henry and J. Livingstone, “Improved position sensitive detectors using high resistivity substrates,” J. Phys. D Appl. Phys. 41(16), 165106 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(040.5160) Detectors : Photodetectors
(040.5350) Detectors : Photovoltaic
(310.6845) Thin films : Thin film devices and applications

ToC Category:
Detectors

History
Original Manuscript: June 17, 2009
Revised Manuscript: August 30, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: October 27, 2009
Published: November 12, 2009

Citation
C. Q. Yu, H. Wang, S. Q. Xiao, and Y. X. Xia, "Direct observation of lateral photovoltaic effect in nano-metal-films," Opt. Express 17, 21712-21722 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-24-21712


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References

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