OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 25 — Dec. 7, 2009
  • pp: 22761–22766
« Show journal navigation

High energy cw-diode pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative amplifier with efficient second harmonic generation

Markus Lührmann, Christian Theobald, Richard Wallenstein, and Johannes A. L’huillier  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 25, pp. 22761-22766 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.022761


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (340 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We report on a 888 nm diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative amplifier with up to 33.7 W output power with a repetition-rate of 20 kHz and an adjustable pulse duration between 217 ps and 1 ns. This setup allowed for efficient second harmonic generation with an efficiency of up to 79 %.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) is known as an attractive technique to amplify ultra short laser pulses with durations of a few femtoseconds and an ultra high intensity [1

1. R. Butkus, R. Danielius, A. Dubietis, A. Piskarskas, and A. Stabinis, “Progress in chirped pulse optical parametric amplifiers,” Appl. Phys. B 79, 693–700 ( 2004). [CrossRef]

5

5. S. Adachi, N. Ishii, T. Kanai, A. Kosuge, J. Itatani, Y. Kobayashi, D. Yoshitomi, K. Torizuka, and S. Watanabe, “5-fs, multi-mJ, CEP-locked parametric chirped-pulse amplifier pumped by a 450-nm source at 1 kHz,” Opt. Express 16, 14341–14352 ( 2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Up to now OPCPAs were operated with repetition rates of up to 1 kHz together with pump pulse energies in the order of a few mJ [5

5. S. Adachi, N. Ishii, T. Kanai, A. Kosuge, J. Itatani, Y. Kobayashi, D. Yoshitomi, K. Torizuka, and S. Watanabe, “5-fs, multi-mJ, CEP-locked parametric chirped-pulse amplifier pumped by a 450-nm source at 1 kHz,” Opt. Express 16, 14341–14352 ( 2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The intensity of the amplified and recompressed pulses are well suited for high-harmonic or X-ray generation for numerous applications such as photoelectron spectroscopy [6

6. G. Tsilimis, C. Benesch, J. Kutzner, and H. Zacharias, “Laser based soft-x-ray pulses for photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20, 246–253 ( 2003). [CrossRef]

] or combustion diagnostics [7

7. C. L. Rettig, W. M. Roquemore, and J. R. Gord, “Efficiency and scaling of an ultrashort-pulse high-repetition-rate laser-driven X-ray source,” Appl. Phys. B 93, 365–372 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

]. However these applications strongly benefit from higher repetition rates of more than 10 kHz, which requires a suitable pump source.

For the pump laser in an OPCPA system usually Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with ns pulse duration have been utilized, which often cause a limited efficiency for pump to signal conversion [8

8. I. Jovanovic, C. A. Ebbers, and C. P. J. Barty, “Hybrid chirped-pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1622–1624 ( 2002) [CrossRef]

, 9

9. J. Collier, C. Hernandez-Gomez, I. N. Ross, P. Matousek, C. N. Danson, and J. Walczak, “Evaluation of an Ultrabroadband High-gain Amplification Technique for Chirped Pulse Amplification Facilities,” Appl. Opt. 38, 7486–7493 ( 1999) [CrossRef]

] and also limit the repetition rate. To achieve multi-kHz repetition rates regenerative amplifiers (RA) can be used [10

10. C. Stolzenburg and A. Giesen, “Picosecond Regenerative Yb:YAG Thin Disk Amplifier at 200 kHz Repetition Rate and 62 W Output Power,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper MA6.

14

14. J. Kleinbauer, R. Knappe, and R. Wallenstein, “13-W picosecond Nd:GdVO4 regenerative amplifier with 200-kHz repetition rate” Appl. Phys. B 81, 163–166 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

]. RA are common to amplify ultra short pulses from laser oscillators by many orders of magnitude, up to tens of mJ and more than 1 kHz. Recently Metzger et al. [12

12. T. Metzger, A. Schwarz, C. Y. Teisset, D. Sutter, A. Killi, R. Kienberger, and F. Krausz, “High-repetition-rate picosecond pump laser based on a Yb:YAG disk amplifier for optical parametric amplification,” Opt. Lett. 34, 2123–2125 ( 2009) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] published the so far most powerful multi kHz RA based on a Yb:YAG thin-disk amplifier design with 3 kHz repetition rate and 75 W output power. RA based on bulk laser crystals as Nd:YVO4 [13

13. M. Siebold, M. Hornung, J. Hein, G. Paunescu, R. Sauerbrey, T. Bergmann, and G. Hollemann, “A high-average-power diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative laser amplifier for picosecond-pulses,” Appl. Phys. B 78, 287–290 ( 2004). [CrossRef]

] or Nd:GdVO4 [14

14. J. Kleinbauer, R. Knappe, and R. Wallenstein, “13-W picosecond Nd:GdVO4 regenerative amplifier with 200-kHz repetition rate” Appl. Phys. B 81, 163–166 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

] have lower pulse energy as well as average power but less complex cavities and pumping schemes. Other RA with some hundred ps pulse duration, some mJ pulse energy and sub 10 Hz repetition rate have been reported, seeded with shaped Q-switched pulses [15

15. A. V. Okishev, “Multimillijoule Picosecond Regenerative Differentiator-Amplifier,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper CFB3. [PubMed]

] and with stacked pulses from a titan sapphire laser oscillator [16

16. Y. Leng, L. Lin, X. Yang, H. Lu, Z. Zhang, and Z. Xu, “Regenerative amplifier with continuously variable pulse duration used in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification laser system for synchronous pumping,” Opt. Eng. 42, 862–866 ( 2003). [CrossRef]

]. The pulse duration as well as the pulse energy would be suitable for our desired application, but the repetition rate is more than thousand times to low.

We present a RA as a pump source for an OPCPA with 20 kHz repetition-rate based on a recently developed oscillator with adjustable pulse duration between 34 ps and 1 ns [17

17. M. Lührmann, C. Theobald, R. Wallenstein, and J. A. L’huillier, “Efficient generation of mode-locked pulses in Nd:YVO4 with a pulse duration adjustable between 34 ps and 1 ns,” Opt. Express 17, 6177–6186 ( 2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], a 888 nm cw diode-pumped high power Nd:YVO4 crystal [18

18. L. McDonagh, R. Wallenstein, and R. Knappe, “47 W, 6 ns constant pulse duration, high-repetition-rate cavity-dumped Q-switched TEM00 Nd:YVO4 oscillator,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3303–3305 ( 2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 19

19. L. McDonagh and R. Wallenstein, “Low-noise 62 W CW intracavity-doubled TEM00 Nd:YVO4 green laser pumped at 888 nm,” Opt. Lett. 32, 802–804 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and a second harmonic generation (SHG) stage. The system allows for the generation of pulses at 532 nm with a repetition rate of 20 kHz, a high pulse energy above 1 mJ and a freely adjustable pulse-duration of some hundred picoseconds. The value of 20 kHz is a compromise between a pump impulse energy necessary for the desired OPCPA application on the one hand and the increase of repetition rate as well as optical efficiency of the pump laser on the other hand. Furthermore the adjustable pulse-durations permits for a good temporal overlap between pump and stretched broadband signal pulses in an OPCPA. Finally these properties in combination with the excellent beam quality allow for high efficient OPCPAs.

2. Experimental setup

The experimental setup of the RA and the external SHG generation is shown in Fig. 1. The seed pulses are provided by a recently developed active mode locked diode pumped Nd:YVO4 master oscillator which provides pulses with an adjustable pulse-duration between 34 ps up to 1 ns and a repetition rate of 108 MHz [17

17. M. Lührmann, C. Theobald, R. Wallenstein, and J. A. L’huillier, “Efficient generation of mode-locked pulses in Nd:YVO4 with a pulse duration adjustable between 34 ps and 1 ns,” Opt. Express 17, 6177–6186 ( 2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In order to reduce the repetition rate to 20 kHz an electro optical pulse picker is used.

To separate the seed pulses from the amplified pulses a thin-film polarizer (TFP), a Faraday rotator and a half-wave plate were used. The following two mirrors and the lens are required to match the mode diameter of the seed and the amplified radiation. The TFP (M2) of the RA, the quarter-wave plate and the β-barium borate Pockels cell (BBO-PC, aperture Ø 4 mm) are used to switch the pulses. The Nd:YVO4 RA crystal has a dimension of 4×4×30 mm3 and is longitudinal pumped with 100 W from a fiber coupled diode laser at 888 nm. Due to the low repetition rate of 20 kHz the thermal lens is significantly stronger compared to cw operation. This is due to of the higher inversion and hence heating from energy-transfer upconversion [20

20. Y. F. Chen, C. C. Liao, Y. P. Lan, and S. C. Wang, “Determination of the Auger upconversion rate in fiber-coupled diode end-pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 70, 487–490 ( 2000). [CrossRef]

, 21

21. I. Musgrave, W. Clarkson, and D. Hanna, “Detailed study of thermal lensing in Nd:YVO4 under intense diode end-pumping,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (Baltimore, MD, 2001), pp. 171–172.

]. Furthermore the output power is reduced by spontaneous emission, due to the short fluorescence lifetime of 100 µs [22

22. Z. Huang, Y. Huang, Y. Chen, and Z. Luo, “Theoretical study on the laser performances of Nd3+:YAG and Nd3+:YVO4 under indirect and direct pumping,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 22, 2564–2569 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

]. This is in the order of the separation of the amplified pulses. In order to compensate for the thermal lens the curvature of the spherical mirrors M3 and M4 is adapted to r=1000 mm. The mirrors M5 and M6 (r=-750 mm) are required in order to stretch the cavity of the RA to 2.3 m to ensure that the BBO-PC is completely switched between two passes of a pulse and also limits the maximal theoretically amplificable pulse duration in the RA to some ns.

Fig. 1. Schematic of the RA with external SHG generation.
Fig. 2. (a) Output power (square) and beam quality factor M2 (triangle) for 2 to 7 cycles in the RA with a repetition rate of 20 kHz and a seed pulse duration of 300 ps. (b) Contrast of the output pulse for 5 cycles in the RA. The insert shows the intracavity signal of the RA.

Finally the amplified pulse is focused by a single lens into a critical phase matched LBO with the dimension of 3×3×15 mm3. The frequency doubled pulses are separated from the pump pulses by two dichroic mirrors.

3. Results

Figure 2(a) shows the output power and the average of the M2-value for x- and y-direction for different numbers of cycles of a pulse in the RA. All M2-values in this paper were measured with the second moment method. The difference of the M2-value for x- and y-direction for all these measurements was less than or equal to 0.02. It is seen that the obtained output power strongly increases with the number of cycles. This results from the high overall gain in the system. Hence only 5 cycles in the RA are required to amplify the 50 nJ of the seed pulses to the maximum pulse energy of well above 1.6 mJ. Between 2 to 6 cycles the M2-value increases only slightly from 1.2 to 1.3. With the 7th cycle the beam quality becomes noticeably inferior and the output power decreases by 37 % compared to the 5th cycle in the RA. The reasons are a reduced gain guiding in the RA crystal and nonlinear effects resulting from the high peak intensity circulating pulses. So it turns out that in this case 5 cycles in the RA are the best choice with respect to output power and beam quality. Therefore all further measurements were done with 5 cycles in the RA.

In general the high gain would allow for a similar amplification in a multipass amplifier setup. However as seen in Fig. 2(a) such an arrangement would require 8-10 passes (corresponding to 4-5 cycles), which is difficult to achieve with the long and small aperture Nd:YVO4 crystal used. A lower number of passes would be made possible by a setup consisting of a preamplifier and a main amplifier. So such an arrangement has no benefits with respect to the complexity. Furthermore the modulator in the RA improves the contrast by defining a short window of amplification, which reduces the amplified spontaneous emission, which is a special problem in amplifiers with very high gain [23

23. W. Koechner, Solid-state laser engineering (Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 1999).

].

In Fig. 2(b) the output pulse of the RA is shown. No pre- or post-pulses can be seen and a contrast exceeding 1:750 for the amplified pulse compared to the background has been achieved. The insert in Fig. 2(b) shows the intracavity signal of the RA. The separation of 15.4 ns between two consecutive pulses is related to the round trip time. Even for the 5th and last cycle the large amplification from cycle to cycle is obvious. Finally, the complete extraction of the pulse after the 5th cycle is shown.

Fig. 3. (a) Output power of RA (triangle, up), SHG output power (triangle, down) and SHG conversion efficiency (cycle) for different seed pulse durations. (b) Pulse duration after RA (triangle, up) and SHG generation (triangle, down) for different seed pulse durations.

Due to the very high gain in the RA and hence the low number of cycles even components with moderate losses are acceptable, the sensitivity in terms of misalignment is reduced and finally the long-term stability is improved.

In Fig. 3(a) the output power of the RA and of the SHG for different seed pulse durations is shown. To avoid a destruction of RA components no seed pulses with pulse-durations shorter than 200 ps were used. While the output power of the RA varies only slightly between 32.1 W and 33.7 Wfor an increasing seed pulse duration, the output power of the SHG stage decreases from 25.5 W to 19.0 W. The reduction of the SHG output power results from the reduced peak intensity for the longer seed pulse duration, since a constant beam diameter of 770 µm has been used in all experiments. This beam diameter was chosen as a compromise between a high conversion efficiency and a spatially undisturbed SHG beam. However, efficiencies similar to that obtained for the 205 ps seed pulse (79 %) should also be possible for longer pulses if a smaller beam diameter is used. For each pulse duration each average M2-value of x- and y-direction obtained in the SHG experiments was below 1.1, while each average M2-value for the amplified pulses was below 1.3. While for each pulse duration the M2-value for the RA in both directions was nearly identical, the M2-value after SHG was slightly worse in x-direction as in y-direction. We measured an average of 1.10 for the x-direction and 1.03 for the y-direction. Probably this is a result of a slight walk off of the pump- and signal-beam in the LBO crystal.

Figure 3(b) shows the pulse duration after the RA and SHG for different seed pulse durations. Data points above the dashed line indicate an elongation and below the dashed line a shortening of the pulses compared to the pulses directly obtained from the seed oscillator. Due to gain narrowing the amplified pulses are slightly longer compared to the seed pulses. In contrast the pulses behind the SHG stage become shorter. This is a result of the suppression of the leading and trailing edge of the pulse during the second-harmonic generation due to the reduced conversion efficiency in the pulse wings. The difference between the pulse duration of the seed pulses at 1064 nm and the frequency doubled pulses at 532 nm constantly increases. With the maximum pulse duration of 1020 ps from the master oscillator we obtained pulses with 822 ps pulse duration from the SHG.

To determine the energy stability of the system the photo-diode signal from the pulses after the RA and SHG was measured with an oscilloscope (bandwidth 250 MHz, sampling rate 5 GS/s). For the RA we measured for all pulse durations a standard deviation of the peak signal below 0.9 % with typical values of 0.6 % and for the SHG a standard deviation below 1.5 % with typical values of 1.0 %. A housing of the system should further improve the stability.

Fig. 4. (a) Normalized, superposed temporal profile of seed (solid), RA (dashed) and SHG (dotted) pulses. (b) Normalized, superposed spectral profile of seed (solid), RA (dashed) and SHG (dotted) pulses.

4. Conclusion

In conclusion we have demonstrated a 888 nm diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 RA with 33.7 W output power at 1064 nm with a repetition-rate of 20 kHz and adjustable pulse durations between 200 ps and 1020 ps. To our knowledge this is the highest average power and pulse energy reported so far for a Nd:YVO4 regenerative amplifier. Finally a high conversion efficiency of up to 79 % for second harmonic has been achieved, which is due to the excellent temporal and spatial profiles of the amplified pulses. These properties make this system an attractive pump source for an OPCPA.

Acknowledgment

We like to thank the German ministry of education and research (BMBF) for funding under contract no. 13N9030.

References and links

1.

R. Butkus, R. Danielius, A. Dubietis, A. Piskarskas, and A. Stabinis, “Progress in chirped pulse optical parametric amplifiers,” Appl. Phys. B 79, 693–700 ( 2004). [CrossRef]

2.

O. Chekhlov, J. Collier, I. Ross, P. Bates, M. Notley, C. Hernandez-Gomez, W. Shaikh, C. Danson, D. Neely, P. Matousek, S. Hancock, and L. Cardoso, “35 J broadband femtosecond optical parametric chirped pulse amplification system,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3665–3667 ( 2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

E. Gaul, M. Martinez, J. Blakeney, A. Jochmann, M. Ringuette, D. Hammond, R. Escamilla, W. Henderson, S. Douglas, and T. Ditmire, “1.1 Petawatt Hybrid, OPCPA-Nd:glass Laser Demonstrated,” in Frontiers in Optics, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper FWX3.

4.

H. Kiriyama, M. Mori, Y. Nakai, T. Shimomura, M. Tanoue, A. Akutsu, H. Okada, T. Motomura, S. Kondo, S. Kanazawa, A. Sagisaka, J. Ma, I. Daito, H. Kotaki, H. Daido, S. Bulanov, T. Kimura, and T. Tajima, “Generation of high-contrast and high-intensity laser pulses using an OPCPA preamplifier in a double CPA, Ti:sapphire laser system,” Opt. Commun. 282, 625–628 ( 2009). [CrossRef]

5.

S. Adachi, N. Ishii, T. Kanai, A. Kosuge, J. Itatani, Y. Kobayashi, D. Yoshitomi, K. Torizuka, and S. Watanabe, “5-fs, multi-mJ, CEP-locked parametric chirped-pulse amplifier pumped by a 450-nm source at 1 kHz,” Opt. Express 16, 14341–14352 ( 2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

G. Tsilimis, C. Benesch, J. Kutzner, and H. Zacharias, “Laser based soft-x-ray pulses for photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20, 246–253 ( 2003). [CrossRef]

7.

C. L. Rettig, W. M. Roquemore, and J. R. Gord, “Efficiency and scaling of an ultrashort-pulse high-repetition-rate laser-driven X-ray source,” Appl. Phys. B 93, 365–372 ( 2008). [CrossRef]

8.

I. Jovanovic, C. A. Ebbers, and C. P. J. Barty, “Hybrid chirped-pulse amplification,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1622–1624 ( 2002) [CrossRef]

9.

J. Collier, C. Hernandez-Gomez, I. N. Ross, P. Matousek, C. N. Danson, and J. Walczak, “Evaluation of an Ultrabroadband High-gain Amplification Technique for Chirped Pulse Amplification Facilities,” Appl. Opt. 38, 7486–7493 ( 1999) [CrossRef]

10.

C. Stolzenburg and A. Giesen, “Picosecond Regenerative Yb:YAG Thin Disk Amplifier at 200 kHz Repetition Rate and 62 W Output Power,” in Advanced Solid-State Photonics, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper MA6.

11.

E. Mottay, M. Delaigue, and A. Courjaud, “CPA Free Sub-Picosecond Ultrafast Laser Amplifier,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper CFB4. [PubMed]

12.

T. Metzger, A. Schwarz, C. Y. Teisset, D. Sutter, A. Killi, R. Kienberger, and F. Krausz, “High-repetition-rate picosecond pump laser based on a Yb:YAG disk amplifier for optical parametric amplification,” Opt. Lett. 34, 2123–2125 ( 2009) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

M. Siebold, M. Hornung, J. Hein, G. Paunescu, R. Sauerbrey, T. Bergmann, and G. Hollemann, “A high-average-power diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative laser amplifier for picosecond-pulses,” Appl. Phys. B 78, 287–290 ( 2004). [CrossRef]

14.

J. Kleinbauer, R. Knappe, and R. Wallenstein, “13-W picosecond Nd:GdVO4 regenerative amplifier with 200-kHz repetition rate” Appl. Phys. B 81, 163–166 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

15.

A. V. Okishev, “Multimillijoule Picosecond Regenerative Differentiator-Amplifier,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper CFB3. [PubMed]

16.

Y. Leng, L. Lin, X. Yang, H. Lu, Z. Zhang, and Z. Xu, “Regenerative amplifier with continuously variable pulse duration used in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification laser system for synchronous pumping,” Opt. Eng. 42, 862–866 ( 2003). [CrossRef]

17.

M. Lührmann, C. Theobald, R. Wallenstein, and J. A. L’huillier, “Efficient generation of mode-locked pulses in Nd:YVO4 with a pulse duration adjustable between 34 ps and 1 ns,” Opt. Express 17, 6177–6186 ( 2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

L. McDonagh, R. Wallenstein, and R. Knappe, “47 W, 6 ns constant pulse duration, high-repetition-rate cavity-dumped Q-switched TEM00 Nd:YVO4 oscillator,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3303–3305 ( 2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

L. McDonagh and R. Wallenstein, “Low-noise 62 W CW intracavity-doubled TEM00 Nd:YVO4 green laser pumped at 888 nm,” Opt. Lett. 32, 802–804 ( 2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

Y. F. Chen, C. C. Liao, Y. P. Lan, and S. C. Wang, “Determination of the Auger upconversion rate in fiber-coupled diode end-pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 crystals,” Appl. Phys. B 70, 487–490 ( 2000). [CrossRef]

21.

I. Musgrave, W. Clarkson, and D. Hanna, “Detailed study of thermal lensing in Nd:YVO4 under intense diode end-pumping,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (Baltimore, MD, 2001), pp. 171–172.

22.

Z. Huang, Y. Huang, Y. Chen, and Z. Luo, “Theoretical study on the laser performances of Nd3+:YAG and Nd3+:YVO4 under indirect and direct pumping,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 22, 2564–2569 ( 2005). [CrossRef]

23.

W. Koechner, Solid-state laser engineering (Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 1999).

24.

S. Marzenell, R. Beigang, and R. Wallenstein, “Limitations and guidelines for measuring the spectral width of ultrashort light pulses with a scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer,” Appl. Phys. B 71, 185–191 ( 2000).

OCIS Codes
(140.3280) Lasers and laser optics : Laser amplifiers
(140.3480) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, diode-pumped
(140.3530) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, neodymium
(140.3515) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, frequency doubled

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: September 4, 2009
Revised Manuscript: November 25, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: November 25, 2009
Published: November 30, 2009

Citation
Markus Lührmann, Christian Theobald, Richard Wallenstein, and Johannes A. L'huillier, "High energy cw-diode pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative amplifier with efficient second harmonic generation," Opt. Express 17, 22761-22766 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-25-22761


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. R. Butkus, R. Danielius, A. Dubietis, A. Piskarskas, and A. Stabinis, "Progress in chirped pulse optical parametric amplifiers," Appl. Phys. B 79,693-700 (2004). [CrossRef]
  2. O. Chekhlov, J. Collier, I. Ross, P. Bates, M. Notley, C. Hernandez-Gomez, W. Shaikh, C. Danson, D. Neely, P. Matousek, S. Hancock, and L. Cardoso, "35 J broadband femtosecond optical parametric chirped pulse amplification system," Opt. Lett. 31,3665-3667 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. E. Gaul, M. Martinez, J. Blakeney, A. Jochmann, M. Ringuette, D. Hammond, R. Escamilla, W. Henderson, S. Douglas, and T. Ditmire, "1.1 Petawatt Hybrid, OPCPA-Nd:glass Laser Demonstrated," in Frontiers in Optics, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper FWX3.
  4. H. Kiriyama, M. Mori, Y. Nakai, T. Shimomura, M. Tanoue, A. Akutsu, H. Okada, T. Motomura, S. Kondo, S. Kanazawa, A. Sagisaka, J. Ma, I. Daito, H. Kotaki, H. Daido, S. Bulanov, T. Kimura, and T. Tajima, "Generation of high-contrast and high-intensity laser pulses using an OPCPA preamplifier in a double CPA, Ti:sapphire laser system," Opt. Commun. 282,625-628 (2009). [CrossRef]
  5. S. Adachi, N. Ishii, T. Kanai, A. Kosuge, J. Itatani, Y. Kobayashi, D. Yoshitomi, K. Torizuka, and S. Watanabe, "5-fs, multi-mJ, CEP-locked parametric chirped-pulse amplifier pumped by a 450-nm source at 1 kHz," Opt. Express 16,14341-14352 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. G. Tsilimis, C. Benesch, J. Kutzner, and H. Zacharias, "Laser based soft-x-ray pulses for photoelectron spectroscopy of surfaces," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20,246-253 (2003). [CrossRef]
  7. C. L. Rettig,W. M. Roquemore, and J. R. Gord, "Efficiency and scaling of an ultrashort-pulse high-repetition-rate laser-driven X-ray source," Appl. Phys. B 93,365-372 (2008). [CrossRef]
  8. I. Jovanovic, C. A. Ebbers, and C. P. J. Barty, "Hybrid chirped-pulse amplification," Opt. Lett. 27,1622-1624 (2002) [CrossRef]
  9. J. Collier, C. Hernandez-Gomez, I. N. Ross, P. Matousek, C. N. Danson, and J. Walczak, "Evaluation of an Ultrabroadband High-gain Amplification Technique for Chirped Pulse Amplification Facilities," Appl. Opt. 38,7486-7493 (1999) [CrossRef]
  10. C. Stolzenburg and A. Giesen, "Picosecond Regenerative Yb:YAG Thin Disk Amplifier at 200 kHz Repetition Rate and 62 W Output Power," in Advanced Solid-State Photonics, OSA Technical Digest Series (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2007), paper MA6.
  11. E. Mottay, M. Delaigue, and A. Courjaud, "CPA Free Sub-Picosecond Ultrafast Laser Amplifier," in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper CFB4. [PubMed]
  12. T. Metzger, A. Schwarz, C. Y. Teisset, D. Sutter, A. Killi, R. Kienberger, and F. Krausz, "High-repetition-rate picosecond pump laser based on a Yb:YAG disk amplifier for optical parametric amplification," Opt. Lett. 34,2123-2125 (2009) [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. M. Siebold, M. Hornung, J. Hein, G. Paunescu, R. Sauerbrey, T. Bergmann, and G. Hollemann, "A high-averagepower diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 regenerative laser amplifier for picosecond-pulses," Appl. Phys. B 78,287-290 (2004). [CrossRef]
  14. J. Kleinbauer, R. Knappe, and R. Wallenstein, "13-W picosecond Nd:GdVO4 regenerative amplifier with 200-kHz repetition rate" Appl. Phys. B 81,163-166 (2005). [CrossRef]
  15. A. V. Okishev, "Multimillijoule Picosecond Regenerative Differentiator-Amplifier," in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/Quantum Electronics and Laser Science Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper CFB3. [PubMed]
  16. Y. Leng, L. Lin, X. Yang, H. Lu, Z. Zhang, and Z. Xu, "Regenerative amplifier with continuously variable pulse duration used in an optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification laser system for synchronous pumping," Opt. Eng. 42,862-866 (2003). [CrossRef]
  17. M. Lührmann, C. Theobald, R. Wallenstein, and J. A. L’huillier, "Efficient generation of mode-locked pulses in Nd:YVO4 with a pulse duration adjustable between 34 ps and 1 ns," Opt. Express 17,6177-6186 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. L. McDonagh, R. Wallenstein, and R. Knappe, "47 W, 6 ns constant pulse duration, high-repetition-rate cavitydumped Q-switched TEM00 Nd:YVO4 oscillator," Opt. Lett. 31,3303-3305 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  19. L. McDonagh and R. Wallenstein, "Low-noise 62 W CW intracavity-doubled TEM00 Nd:YVO4 green laser pumped at 888 nm," Opt. Lett. 32,802-804 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. Y. F. Chen, C. C. Liao, Y. P. Lan, and S. C.  Wang, "Determination of the Auger upconversion rate in fiber-coupled diode end-pumped Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 crystals," Appl. Phys. B 70,487-490 (2000). [CrossRef]
  21. I. Musgrave, W. Clarkson, and D. Hanna, "Detailed study of thermal lensing in Nd:YVO4 under intense diode end-pumping," in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (Baltimore, MD, 2001), pp. 171-172.
  22. Z. Huang, Y. Huang, Y. Chen, and Z. Luo, "Theoretical study on the laser performances of Nd3+:YAG and Nd3+:YVO4 under indirect and direct pumping," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 22,2564-2569 (2005). [CrossRef]
  23. W. Koechner, Solid-state laser engineering (Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York, 1999).
  24. S. Marzenell, R. Beigang, and R. Wallenstein, "Limitations and guidelines for measuring the spectral width of ultrashort light pulses with a scanning Fabry-P’erot interferometer," Appl. Phys. B 71,185-191 (2000).

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.

Figures

Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3.
 
Fig. 4.
 

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited