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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 5 — Mar. 2, 2009
  • pp: 3299–3304
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Wavelength tunability and pulse duration control in frequency shifted feedback Er-doped fiber lasers

Michal P. Nikodem, Ewelina Kluzniak, and Krzysztof Abramski  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 5, pp. 3299-3304 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.003299


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Abstract

This paper presents the experimental studies on the all-fiber frequency shifted feedback erbium laser. Impact of the gain section profile on laser operation is shown. Two methods of wavelength tuning are presented. We obtained 8.3 and 10 nm tuning range in electrical and manual tuning respectively. Pulse duration can be also controlled and changed from 2 to 5 ps. The shortest pulses duration we have obtained was 1.7 ps.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

During last decades mode-locked lasers have became primary and irreplaceable sources of ultrashort pulses and optical frequency combs. Erbium doped fiber lasers are especially interesting and have been widely studied in last 20 years. They have numerous advantages (e.g. wide gain bandwidth, narrow linewidth, reliability) and have found applications in many fields from metrology to telecommunication. Frequency Shifted Feedback (FSF) is one of the technique that can be used to obtain mode-locking in this type of lasers. Such sources are especially interesting for device characterization, metrology, optical reflectometry, frequency measurements, optical ranging, imaging and medical diagnosis. A complete description of FSF lasers can be found in [1

1. H. Sabert and E. Brinkmeyer “Pulse Generation in Fiber Lasers with Frequency Shifted Feedback,” J. Lightwave Technol. 12, 1360–1368 (1994). [CrossRef]

]. FSF mode-locking can be obtained in Yb fiber lasers [2–4

2. A. M. Heidt, J. P. Burger, J.-N. Maran, and N. Traynor “High power and high energy ultrashort pulse generation with a frequency shifted feedback fiber laser,” Opt. Express 15, 11396–11401 (2007). [CrossRef]

] and in Er fiber lasers as well [5–7

5. M. Nikodem, H. Sergeant, P. Kaczmarek, and K. Abramski “Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator,” Proc. SPIE 7141, 71410B (2008). [CrossRef]

]. This technique is also very effective when widely tunable operation is required [8

8. S. U. Alam and A. B. Grudinin “Tunable picosecond frequency-shifted feedback fiber laser at 1550 nm,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16, 2012–2014 (2004). [CrossRef]

]. Ryu et al. have presented the injection seeding of the FSF optical frequency comb (OFC) source with the external cavity diode laser [9

9. H. Y. Ryu, H. S. Moon, and H. S. Suh “Optical frequency comb generator based on actively mode-locked fiber ring laser using an acousto-optic modulator with injection-seeding,” Opt. Express 15, 11396–11401 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. This technique was previously demonstrated in case of multi-wavelength sources [10

10. S. Bennett, B. Cai, E. Burr, O. Gough, and A. J. Seeds “1.8-THz Bandwidth, Zero-Frequency Error, Tunable Optical Comb Generatorr for DWDM Applications,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11, 551–553 (1999). [CrossRef]

] and Q-switched lasers [11

11. P. D. Dragic “Injection-Seeded Q-Switched Fiber Ring Laser,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16, 1822–1824 (2004). [CrossRef]

]. Ryu et al. have shown that using acousto-optical modulator (AOM) 1.8 THz wide OFC can be generated and the frequency of its modes can be controlled by the external laser injected into the cavity. Tunability and repetition rate increasing up to 150 GHz was also presented in [12

12. J. M. Sousa and O. G. Okhotnikov “Short pulse generation and control in Er-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber lasers,” Opt. Commun. 183, 227–241 (2000). [CrossRef]

].

Stellpflug et al. has presented an extensive paper devoted to the numerical simulation of titanium-sapphire and neodymium-based FSF lasers [13

13. M. Stellpflug, G. Bonnet, B. W. Shore, and K. Bergmann “Dynamics of frequency shifted feedback lasers: simulation studies,” Opt. Express 11, 2060–2080 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Erbium fiber laser requires however more complicated model. Huge advantage of EDF is the possibility of controlling its gain profile. Typical EDF has the gain bandwidth from 1525 nm to 1565 nm (telecommunication C-band) with maximum around 1530 nm. Gain profile can be however easily modified and shifted towards longer wavelengths. This so called L-band EDFA bases on secondary pumping phenomena in un-pumped active fiber and can be constructed simply by increasing the Er fiber length or by using two separate EDF stages [14

14. J. Lee, U-Ch. Ryu, S. J. Ahn, and N. Park “Enhancement of Power Conversion Efficiency for an L-Band EDFA with Secondary Pumping Effect in the unpumped EDF Section,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11, 42–44 (2004).

].

In this paper we present the impact of the gain profile on FSF laser operation. We show how different gain section configurations affect the operation wavelength of the laser. We present two methods of wavelength tuning – electrical tuning with different RF power applied to the AOM and manual tuning using tunable Bragg grating. We also show that in certain configurations RF power can be used to control the pulse duration.

2. Laser configuration

Configuration of the frequency shifted feedback all-fiber laser is shown in Fig. 1. It consists of gain section (erbium doped fiber EDF pumped with 980nm laser diode using WDM coupler), optical isolator (it guarantees unidirectional operation), output coupler and acousto-optical modulator (AOM). Modulator down-shifts the frequency of the input light by 40 MHz and is driven using RF generator which can provide up to 21dBm output power. The total length of the cavity is approximately 5 meters.

Fig. 1. Configuration of the FSF Er fiber laser

Because our laser is an all-fiber configuration it is easier to adjust the modulation frequency to the length of the laser than vice versa. Figure 2 shows the AOM attenuation characteristics. Although modulator was design to be driven with 40 MHz signal, we can shift the frequency by 2–3 MHz without introducing large losses (Fig. 2 – left). Also the RF power can be changed however this increases AOM attenuation significantly (Fig. 2 – right). As we will show, this intracavity losses controlled by the RF power applied to the AOM can be used to tune the laser wavelength and to control the pulse duration.

Fig. 2. AOM attenuation in a function of modulation frequency for RF power = 21dBm (left) and in a function of wavelength for different RF power and modulation frequency = 40 MHz (right).

In order to investigate the impact of the gain medium profile and laser setup on the laser operation we designed four laser configurations (Table 1). They differ in type of the erbium fiber used, length of the EDF and in amount of power that is out-coupled. We have used three different gain sections (EDF 1, EDF 2 and EDF 3). They were all pumped with 200 mW laser diode at 980 nm. Their gain profiles are shown in Fig. 3 (measured with tunable laser source, 3 mW input power). EDF 1 is build with typical active fiber with medium Er concentration. It is characterized by the 30 dB/m attenuation at 1530 nm. The length of the fiber we have used is 2.5 meters. Gain profile is very flat with small peak around 1530 nm. EDF 2 and EDF 3 were constructed using highly doped active fiber (attenuation 80 dB/m at 1530 nm). They have different length which has impact on their gain profile. EDF 2 has flat gain characteristic with peak value at 1560 nm. EDF 3 has longer Er fiber so the whole pump power is absorbed and secondary pumping effect can be observed. That is why gain at 1530 nm is reduced and the gain peak is shifted beyond the 1560 nm.

Table 1. Details of the FSF laser configurations described in this paper

table-icon
View This Table
Fig. 3. Normalized gain profile for three different gain section configuration

3. Experimental results

3.1 Tuning with the RF power

We have started our experiments with the configuration #1. Output spectrum for different RF power is presented in Fig. 4. Even though the AOM shifts down the frequency of the input light laser operates around 1530 nm. One reason is the gain profile that has its peak there. Also the AOM that tries to move the frequency comb to the longer wavelengths simultaneously slightly favors shorter wavelengths with its attenuation characteristics (see Fig. 2, attenuation vs. wavelength). Due to high out-coupling ratio (50 percent) average output power was 26 mW (for RF power 21dBm). By changing the RF power from 21 to 9 dBm we could narrow the bandwidth of the optical frequency comb which affects the duration of the generated pulses. In our autocorrelator setup we were able to introduce only 10 ps delay. This was however enough to observe the changes in the pulse duration even though autocorrelation signal was weak and noisy. For RF power = 21 dBm pulse duration was 2 ps and it increased to approximately 5 ps for RF power = 9 dBm. In the same time center wavelength was almost unchanged.

Fig. 4. Configuration #1 – output spectrum for different RF power (left) and interferometric autocorrelation (right; a – RF power = 21dBm, b – RF power = 9dBm)

In second configuration we have used the same gain section as in the first one. We have only changed the output coupler (now only 10 percent of the power was out-coupled). This had the impact on the average output power (which was now only 4 mW) and also on operation wavelength as is shown in Fig. 5. For high RF powers (low AOM attenuation) laser generated frequency comb around 1560 nm. For RF power = 16 dBm (AOM attenuation is approximately 8–9 dB) we observed wavelength switching (also described in [5

5. M. Nikodem, H. Sergeant, P. Kaczmarek, and K. Abramski “Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator,” Proc. SPIE 7141, 71410B (2008). [CrossRef]

,12

12. J. M. Sousa and O. G. Okhotnikov “Short pulse generation and control in Er-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber lasers,” Opt. Commun. 183, 227–241 (2000). [CrossRef]

]). This interesting phenomena can be easily understand when we look for the gain profile. Even though the peak gain is at 1530 nm AOM shifts the laser operation wavelength. However, if we introduce to much intracavity losses (with to small RF power and/or with to high out-coupling ratio) amplification at 1560 nm is to small to support the lasing in this region. That is why laser start to operate around 1530 nm where the amplification is still sufficient.

Fig. 5. Configuration #2 – output spectrum for different RF power

Fig. 6. Configuration #3 – output spectrum for different RF power

This situation changes in case of fourth configuration when EDF 3 is used as an active section. As we shown in Fig. 3 gain bandwidth for 1.2 m long highly doped Er fiber is significantly shifted towards longer wavelengths and the gain in 1530 nm region is strongly suppressed. This affects the central wavelength of the generated OFC which is in 1560 nm region even for very high AOM attenuation (>20dB). This is shown in Fig. 7.

Fig. 7. Configuration #4 – output spectrum for different RF power
Fig. 8. Configuration #4 – interferometric autocorrelation for RF power = 21dBm (left), center wavelength and average output power in a function of RF power (right).

The central wavelength of the laser shifts from 1567.5 nm to 1559.2 nm when the RF power is changed from 21 dBm to 0 dBm. Simultaneously 3dB bandwidth changes from 2.1 nm to 1.1 nm. The shortest pulses were obtained for maximal RF power. Interferometric autocorrelation is shown on Fig. 8. Pulse duration is 1.7 ps (assuming Gaussian shape). Figure 8 shows also how central wavelength and average output power depends on RF power.

3.2 Tuning with the fiber Bragg grating

Tuning method presented above has several advantages. It does not need any additional components inside the laser cavity and both pulse duration and central wavelength can be controlled in relatively wide range. However, the main disadvantage is the problem of controlling only one parameter without changing another (e.g. when tuning the central wavelength in fourth configuration we simultaneously change output power). If we are interested in tuning the wavelength without affecting the output power and pulse duration the configuration with tunable Bragg grating would be suitable. In our experiments the optical circulator and manually tunable fiber Bragg grating were inserted into the cavity (between isolator and output coupler in configuration #2). Cavity wass approximately 10 m long. TBG has bandwidth of 1 nm and tuning range from 1546 to 1556 nm. When modulation frequency (RF power = 21 dBm) was adjusted to match the 2nd harmonic of the cavity round trip mode-locking was obtained. Output spectra are shown in Fig. 9. Average output power (1 mW) and 3dB bandwidth (0.2 nm) did not change within the whole TBG tuning range. Pulses were too long to measure their duration with our autocorrelator however 0.2 nm bandwidth corresponds to approximately 20-25 ps pulses.

Fig. 9. Spectra of the tunable mode-locked laser

4. Conclusions

In this paper we described our experiments with FSF all-fiber erbium laser. Laser generates pulses as short as 1.7 ps with 40 MHz repetition frequency. Simple turn-key configuration does not require any polarization adjustment. We investigated the impact of the gain section profile on the laser operation. We have shown that with proper design of the gain section wavelength tuning of the laser can be obtained by simply changing the RF power applied to the AOM. This method can also be used to control the pulse duration. Continuous wavelength tuning over more than 8 nm was obtained. We have also presented a configuration with tunable fiber Bragg grating that allowed us to tune the laser in 10 nm range (limited only by the grating properties).

Acknowledgments

The work presented in this paper was supported by the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education grant N515 029 32/2079.

References and links

1.

H. Sabert and E. Brinkmeyer “Pulse Generation in Fiber Lasers with Frequency Shifted Feedback,” J. Lightwave Technol. 12, 1360–1368 (1994). [CrossRef]

2.

A. M. Heidt, J. P. Burger, J.-N. Maran, and N. Traynor “High power and high energy ultrashort pulse generation with a frequency shifted feedback fiber laser,” Opt. Express 15, 11396–11401 (2007). [CrossRef]

3.

V. V. Ogurtsov, L. P. Yatsenko, V. M. Khodakovskyy, B. W. Shore, G. Bonnet, and K. Bergmann “Experimental characterization of an Yb3+-doped fiber ring laser with frequency-shifted feedback,” Opt. Commun. 266, 627–637 (2006). [CrossRef]

4.

V. V. Ogurtsov, L. P. Yatsenko, V. M. Khodakovskyy, B. W. Shore, G. Bonnet, and K. Bergmann “High accuracy ranging with Yb3+-doped fiber-ring frequency-shifted feedback laser with phase-modulated seed,” Opt. Commun. 266, 266–273 (2006). [CrossRef]

5.

M. Nikodem, H. Sergeant, P. Kaczmarek, and K. Abramski “Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator,” Proc. SPIE 7141, 71410B (2008). [CrossRef]

6.

M. Yoshida, M. Fujimoto, M. Nakazawa, and H. Ito “A mode-locked frequency-shifted feedback fiber laser,” Proceedings of Lasers and Electro-Optics, 2001. CLEO 2001, 299–300 (2001).

7.

V. V. Ogurtsov, L. P. Yatsenko, V. M. Khodakovskyy, B. W. Shore, G. Bonnet, and K. Bergmann “An all-fiber frequency-shifted feedback laser for optical ranging; signal variation with distance,” Opt. Commun. 281, 1679–1685 (2008). [CrossRef]

8.

S. U. Alam and A. B. Grudinin “Tunable picosecond frequency-shifted feedback fiber laser at 1550 nm,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16, 2012–2014 (2004). [CrossRef]

9.

H. Y. Ryu, H. S. Moon, and H. S. Suh “Optical frequency comb generator based on actively mode-locked fiber ring laser using an acousto-optic modulator with injection-seeding,” Opt. Express 15, 11396–11401 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

S. Bennett, B. Cai, E. Burr, O. Gough, and A. J. Seeds “1.8-THz Bandwidth, Zero-Frequency Error, Tunable Optical Comb Generatorr for DWDM Applications,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11, 551–553 (1999). [CrossRef]

11.

P. D. Dragic “Injection-Seeded Q-Switched Fiber Ring Laser,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16, 1822–1824 (2004). [CrossRef]

12.

J. M. Sousa and O. G. Okhotnikov “Short pulse generation and control in Er-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber lasers,” Opt. Commun. 183, 227–241 (2000). [CrossRef]

13.

M. Stellpflug, G. Bonnet, B. W. Shore, and K. Bergmann “Dynamics of frequency shifted feedback lasers: simulation studies,” Opt. Express 11, 2060–2080 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

J. Lee, U-Ch. Ryu, S. J. Ahn, and N. Park “Enhancement of Power Conversion Efficiency for an L-Band EDFA with Secondary Pumping Effect in the unpumped EDF Section,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11, 42–44 (2004).

OCIS Codes
(140.3510) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, fiber
(140.4050) Lasers and laser optics : Mode-locked lasers

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: December 22, 2008
Revised Manuscript: January 23, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: January 23, 2009
Published: February 17, 2009

Citation
Michal P. Nikodem, Ewelina Kluzniak, and Krzysztof Abramski, "Wavelength tunability and pulse duration control in frequency shifted feedback Er-doped fiber lasers," Opt. Express 17, 3299-3304 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-5-3299


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References

  1. H. Sabert and E. Brinkmeyer, "Pulse Generation in Fiber Lasers with Frequency Shifted Feedback," J. Lightwave Technol. 12, 1360-1368 (1994). [CrossRef]
  2. A. M. Heidt, J. P. Burger, J.-N. Maran, and N. Traynor, "High power and high energy ultrashort pulse generation with a frequency shifted feedback fiber laser," Opt. Express 15, 11396-11401 (2007). [CrossRef]
  3. V. V. Ogurtsov, L. P. Yatsenko, V. M. Khodakovskyy, B. W. Shore, G. Bonnet, and K. Bergmann, "Experimental characterization of an Yb3+-doped fiber ring laser with frequency-shifted feedback," Opt. Commun. 266, 627-637 (2006). [CrossRef]
  4. V. V. Ogurtsov, L. P. Yatsenko, V. M. Khodakovskyy, B. W. Shore, G. Bonnet, K. Bergmann, "High accuracy ranging with Yb3+-doped fiber-ring frequency-shifted feedback laser with phase-modulated seed," Opt. Commun. 266, 266-273 (2006). [CrossRef]
  5. M. Nikodem, H. Sergeant, P. Kaczmarek, and K. Abramsk, "Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator," Proc. SPIE 7141, 71410B (2008). [CrossRef]
  6. M. Yoshida, M. Fujimoto, M. Nakazawa, H. Ito, "A mode-locked frequency-shifted feedback fiber laser," Proceedings of Lasers and Electro-Optics, 2001.CLEO 2001, 299-300 (2001).
  7. V. V. Ogurtsov, L. P. Yatsenko, V. M. Khodakovskyy, B. W. Shore, G. Bonnet, K. Bergmann, "An all-fiber frequency-shifted feedback laser for optical ranging; signal variation with distance," Opt. Commun. 281, 1679-1685 (2008). [CrossRef]
  8. S. U. Alam and A. B. Grudinin, "Tunable picosecond frequency-shifted feedback fiber laser at 1550 nm," IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16, 2012-2014 (2004). [CrossRef]
  9. H. Y. Ryu, H. S. Moon, and H. S. Suh, "Optical frequency comb generator based on actively mode-locked fiber ring laser using an acousto-optic modulator with injection-seeding," Opt. Express 15, 11396-11401 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. S. Bennett, B. Cai, E. Burr, O. Gough, and A. J. Seeds, "1.8-THz Bandwidth, Zero-Frequency Error, Tunable Optical Comb Generatorr for DWDM Applications," IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11, 551-553 (1999). [CrossRef]
  11. P. D. Dragic "Injection-Seeded Q-Switched Fiber Ring Laser," IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 16, 1822-1824 (2004). [CrossRef]
  12. J. M. Sousa and O. G. Okhotnikov, "Short pulse generation and control in Er-doped frequency-shifted-feedback fiber lasers," Opt. Commun. 183, 227-241 (2000). [CrossRef]
  13. M. Stellpflug, G. Bonnet, B. W. Shore, and K. Bergmann "Dynamics of frequency shifted feedback lasers: simulation studies," Opt. Express 11, 2060-2080 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. J. Lee, U-Ch. Ryu, S. J. Ahn, and N. Park, "Enhancement of Power Conversion Efficiency for an L-Band EDFA with Secondary Pumping Effect in the unpumped EDF Section," IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11, 42-44 (2004).

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