OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 5 — Mar. 2, 2009
  • pp: 3353–3361
« Show journal navigation

Diode-pumped ultrashort-pulse generation based on Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic multi-gain-media oscillator

Masaki Tokurakawa, Akira Shirakawa, Ken-ichi Ueda, Hideki Yagi, Meichin Noriyuki, Takagimi Yanagitani, and Alexander A. Kaminskii  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 5, pp. 3353-3361 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.003353


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (497 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

Diode-pumped mode-locked laser operation based on Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 multi-gain-media oscillator has been demonstrated. 66-fs pulse duration with an average power of 1.5 W and 53-fs pulse duration with an average power of 1 W under 8-W laser diode pumping were achieved. The optical-to-optical efficiency was 18.8%. Additionally, 68-fs pulse duration with an average power of 540 mW from Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic was also obtained.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

In the recent years, a demand for a compact, reliable and high power femtosecond laser is growing. It has several applications not only in a scientific field but also in an industrial field, such as optical comb generation, cutting a very thin glass plate, processing for transparent materials and so on. A Ti3+:Al2O3 laser system is the most developed laser system in an ultrashort-pulse region so far. Today few-cycle-pulse oscillators, several-J-energy and several-hundred-TW-peak-power amplifier systems are commercially available. However, there are deficiencies in their applications in the industrial field. Ti3+:Al2O3 laser system needs a green pumping and has a large quantum defect that result in requirement of an expensive pump source and a large cooling system. Those problems also make its high average power operation difficult even though Al2O3 has a high thermal conductivity. Hence, in the past decade, femtosecond lasers based on Cr3+ and Yb3+-ion-doped materials have been extensively investigated [1–15

1. I. T. Sorokina, E. Sorokin, E. Wintner, A. Cassanho, H. P. Jenssen, and R. Szipöcs, “14-fs pulse generation in Kerr-lens mode-locked prismless Cr:LiSGaF and Cr:LiSAF lasers: observation of pulse self-frequency shift,” Opt. Lett. 22, 1716–1718 (1997). [CrossRef]

]. Yb3+-ion-doped crystalline materials have been particularly recognized as great candidates for a highly efficient high power femtosecond laser, because they possess several advantages. Their unique energy-level scheme composed of only two manifolds leads to very small quantum defect and absence of undesirable effects such as excited-state absorption and cross relaxation, that allow highly efficient operation with small thermal loads [16

16. W. F. Krupke, “Ytterbium solid-state lasers-the first decade,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 6, 1287–1296 (2000). [CrossRef]

]. They also enable a high average power operation and their relatively long upper state lifetimes make them prominent gain media for amplification. In addition, their fluorescence peaks occur near the wavelength of 1 μm range where a valley of the fluorescence spectra of Ti3+:Al2O3 and Er3+-ion-doped laser exists. Therefore their wavelength ranges are important for some applications. On the other hand, their quasi-three-level laser scheme needs high intensity pumping to overcome a reabsorption effect. The performance of commercially available InGaAs-laser diodes (LDs) has been dramatically improved in this decade, so that they have strongly accelerated the development of Yb3+-ion-doped lasers. From a mode-locked ytterbium fiber oscillator, a pulse duration of as short as 28 fs has been reported [17

17. X. Zhou, D. Yoshitomi, Y. Kobayashi, and K. Torizuka, “Generation of 28-fs pulses from a mode-locked ytterbium fiber oscillator,” Opt. Express 16, 7055–7059 (2008) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Solid-state laser operations with sub-100 fs pulses [5–12

5. H. Liu, J. Nees, and G. Mourou, “Diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KY(WO4)2 laser,” Opt. Lett. 26, 1723–1725 (2001). [CrossRef]

] as well as high-power femtosecond solid-state laser operations [18–20

18. E. Innerhofer, T. Südmeyer, F. Brunner, R. Häring, A. Aschwanden, R. Paschotta, U. Keller, C. Hönninger, and M. Kumkar, “60 W average power in 810-fs pulses from a thin-disk Yb:YAG laser,” Opt. Lett. 28, 367–369 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] based on direct LD pumping also have been reported. While some single crystals and disorder crystals have so broad gain bandwidths that sub-100 fs pulses can be generated, they tend to suffer their low thermal conductivities, low mechanical toughness, low absorption cross-section values and/or anisotropy of the thermo-mechanical properties. Among Yb3+-ion-doped crystalline materials, the isotropic sesquioxides (Re2O3, Re=Y, Sc, and Lu) are very attractive for a high-power femtosecond laser since they have excellent thermal conductivities, moderately broad fluorescence spectra and isotropic construction [21

21. U. Griebner, V. Petrov, K. Petermann, and V. Peters, “Passively mode-locked Yb:Lu2O3 laser,” Opt. Express 12, 3125–3130 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-14-3125. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. A high-power femtosecond laser operation with a high efficiency based on Yb3+:Lu2O3 single crystal has been successfully achieved [22

22. S. V. Marchese, C. R. E. Baer, R. Peters, C. Kränkel, A. G. Engqvist, M. Golling, D. J. H. C. Maas, K. Petermann, T. Südmeyer, G. Huber, and U. Keller, “Efficient femtosecond high power Yb:Lu2O3 thin disk laser,” Opt. Express 15, 16966–16971 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-25-16966. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. On the other hand, their fluorescence spectral bandwidths are not so much broad, so that their pulse durations were about 200 fs in experimentally [21

21. U. Griebner, V. Petrov, K. Petermann, and V. Peters, “Passively mode-locked Yb:Lu2O3 laser,” Opt. Express 12, 3125–3130 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-14-3125. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,23

23. M. Tokurakawa, K. Takaichi, A. Shirakawa, K. I. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped 188 fs mode-locked Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 071101 (2007). [CrossRef]

], and have been considered to be limited to about 100 fs. Recently, we have reported sub-100 fs pulse operations with Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Lu2O3 [24

24. M. Tokurakawa, A. Shirakawa, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped sub-100 fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Sc2O3 ceramic laser,” Opt. Lett. 32, 3382–3384 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 25

25. M. Tokurakawa, A. Shirakawa, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped 65-fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Lu2O3 and non-doped Y2O3 combined ceramic laser,” Opt. Lett. 33, 1380–1382 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] where the spectral bandwidths of the pulses have become broader than their fluorescence spectral bandwidths. It is expected to arise from nonlinear effects such as self-phase modulation and Kerr-lensing. Such extremely broad spectral broadening over the gain-bandwidth limitation of a gain material has also been observed with Yb:YAG oscillators [26

26. S. Matsubara, M. Takama, M. Inoue, S. Kawato, and Y. Ishida, “Efficient Ultrashort-Pulse Generation Overcoming the Limit of Fluorescence Spectrum of the Gain Material,”in Frontiers in Optics, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper FTuT1.

, 27

27. S. Uemura and K. Torizuka, “Kerr-lens mode-locked diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/International Quantum Electronics Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2004), paper CTuP36.

]. In the case of sesquioxides, their high nonlinear refractive induces (5.32±1.33 ×10-13 esu for Sc2O3 and 5.79±1.45×10-13 esu for Y2O3) [28

28. Yu. Senatsky, A. Shirakawa, Y. Sato, J. Hagiwara, J. Lu, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, and T. Yanagitani, “Nonlinear refractive index of ceramic laser media and perspectives of their usage in a high-power laser-driver,” Laser Phys. Lett. 1, 500–506 (2004). [CrossRef]

] can be helpful for the broadening. Therefore, Yb:sesquioxides can be considered as great candidates for a sub-100 fs high average power laser.

In this letter we have demonstrated ultrashort-pulse generation based on Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic multi-gain-media oscillator. A 66-fs pulse duration with a 1.5-W average power and a 53-fs pulse duration with a 1-W average power were obtained without water cooling. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of an ultrashort-pulse operation based on multi-gain-media oscillator and is the highest average power operation among sub-100 fs Yb3+-ion-doped solid-state lasers ever reported. We also demonstrated 68-fs pulse generation based on Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic alone as a reference.

2. Multi-gain-media oscillator

The center positions of the fluorescence spectral peaks of Yb:sesquioxides are slightly different to each other. Therefore, a broader gain bandwidth can be formed by a combination of them. The effective gain cross section σgain of Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic multi-gain media can be written as

σgain=β1(1α)σe1(1β1)(1α)σa1+β2ασe2(1β2)ασa2,
(1)

where σel, σal, σe2 and σa2 are emission and absorption cross sections of Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3, respectively. β1 and β2 indicate population inversion ratios of Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3, respectively. α indicates ratio of the Yb3+-ion number in the Yb3+:Y2O3 gain part against the total Yb3+-ion number interacting with the laser mode. The effective gain cross sections for different ratios α and β are shown in Fig. 1. Its FWHM strongly depends on the ratios α and β. With proper α and β, the FWHM around 1035 nm becomes broader than 25 nm, more than 1.5 times broader than that of Yb3+:Sc2O3 (11.6 nm) or Yb3+:Y2O3 (17 nm). In addition, this gain bandwidth broadening can be carried out with keeping their own properties such as thermal conductivities, mechanical toughness and absorption cross-section values.

3. Experimental set-up

The experimental setup is schematically shown in Fig. 2. We constructed a Z-shaped astigmatically compensated cavity. As the gain media, an Yb3+:Sc2O3 (1 mm thick, CYb=2.5 at.%) and Yb3+:Y2O3 (1.5 mm thick, CYb=1.8 at.%) ceramics were used simultaneously. They correspond to α of 0.46. They were physically contacted to each other without any coating and arranged at the Brewster angle. Due to their close refractive index values [28

28. Yu. Senatsky, A. Shirakawa, Y. Sato, J. Hagiwara, J. Lu, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, and T. Yanagitani, “Nonlinear refractive index of ceramic laser media and perspectives of their usage in a high-power laser-driver,” Laser Phys. Lett. 1, 500–506 (2004). [CrossRef]

], their Brewster angles are almost the same as each other and additional loss of the contact was very small. They were mounted in a copper holder without any additional cooling. The Yb3+:Sc2O3 ceramic was situated at the near side of the pump source and the Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic was situated at the opposite side. As the pump source a broad-stripe LD [emission area of 1 × 95 μm (vertical × horizontal), 8 W, 976 nm, Δλ~5 nm, Lumics GmbH] was used. The measured beam quality M2 of the pump beam were ~1 in the vertical direction and >20 in the horizontal direction. The pump beam was focused into the ceramics to 1/e2 diameters of about 25 μm × 100 μm by four beam-shaping lenses. The maximum incident pump power was 7.4 W. The folding mirrors (M1, M2, Layertec GmbH) have 100 mm radii of curvature (ROC) on both surfaces to eliminate a concave lens effect and are antireflection coated for wavelength below 980 nm and high-reflection (99.9%) coated above 1020 nm. In the continuous wave (cw) operation, the laser mode diameters inside the gain ceramics are calculated to be about 40 × 38 μm in air. To achieve stable and self-starting mode-locked operation, a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM, BATOP GmbH) with a 1% saturable absorption and a 10 ps recovery time was used. The laser beam was focused onto the SESAM by a concave mirror (M3, ROC = 400 mm). The estimated laser mode field diameters focused onto the SESAM are about 220 × 190 μm. As a dispersion compensation element, an SF10 Brewster prism pair (P) with the tip-to-tip separation of 40 cm was inserted in the output arm. A 10% transmittance output coupler (OC) with a wedge of about 30 minutes was used.

Fig. 1. (a) Absorption and emission cross sections of Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 used in the estimation. (b)-(d) Estimated effective gain cross sections of their multi-gain media for (b) α= 0.3, (c) α= 0.5 and (d) α= 0.7 with different β’s.
Fig. 2. Experimental setup of the mode-locked multi-gain-media oscillator.

4. Results

In a cw operation (replacing the SESAM by a high-reflection mirror), an output power of about 1.9 W was obtained from the cavity. For the mode-locked operation, at first we optimized the cavity with respect to the average power. Under this optimization an average power of 1.7 W was obtained. The output pulses, however, showed serious multi-pulse instability and the pulse duration was limited to several hundred fs. Next, we optimized the cavity with respect to the pulse duration. The positions and the folding angles of the concave mirrors (M1, M2) were carefully adjusted. Under the optimization the resonator became in an almost unstable state in the vertical direction and was not fully astigmatically compensated. However, above the incident pump power of ~7.3 W (this threshold power strongly depends on the alignment) the multi-pulse instability was strongly suppressed; in other words, the multi-pulses were converted to a single pulse. The allowance of the distance between the folding mirrors for this suppression was only several 100 μm. During the optimization the average power once decreased to about 1.3 W. At the same time of the multi-pulse suppression, the average power increased from 1.3 W to ~1.5 W and the spectral bandwidth broadened from several nm to ~20 nm. The significant change in the laser mode field diameter was also observed at the same time. The sech2-fit pulse duration of 66 fs with the average power of 1.5 W at the repetition rate of 89 MHz was obtained (Fig. 3). The center wavelength was 1041 nm and the spectral bandwidth was 19.7 nm. The time bandwidth product was 0.36. The peak intensity was about 0.25 MW and the optical-to-optical efficiency was about 18.8% (against the LD power of 8 W). As shown in Fig. 4, the measured laser-mode profiles of the leaking beam at the point X (see Fig. 2. The distance from M3 was about 40 cm) was an ellipse before the multi-pulse suppression and it became a circle after that. By changing the insertion depth of the prisms and the distance of the folding mirrors (M1, M2), the shortest pulse duration of 53 fs with a 1-W average power was also achieved (Fig. 5). The spectral bandwidth was 27.3 nm and the time bandwidth product was 0.40 (Fig. 6). About the stability, the short pulse operation kept for longer than 30 minutes. However, it showed an instant instability during the operation and the stable time decreased as the pulse was shorter. It is also very sensitive to the alignment. The mode-locked operation has also been investigated with a couple of SESAMs with different specifications (BATOP GmbH , absorption depths of 0.5% and 1.3% with a recovery time of 500 fs). Pulses as short as sub 60 fs have been also obtained with both SESAMs. Therefore, the pulse durations were almost independent from the SESAMs.

Fig. 3. Pulse train of continuous wave Kerr-lens mode-locking in a μs-time scale.

We also demonstrated a mode-locked operation based on an Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic (3mm thick, CYb=2 at.%) alone. The Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic was also oriented at the Brewster angle and the cavity setup was almost the same but a different pump source (5 W fiber-coupled LD, 50-μm core diameter, NA of 0.15, center wavelength of 975 nm, Δλ~5 nm) and a different output coupler (5% transmittance) were used. By this setup, the similar behaviors were observed and 68-fs pulses with an average power of 540 mW were obtained at the center wavelength of 1036 nm (Fig. 7). The spectral bandwidth was 20 nm. The repetition rate was about 99 MHz. However, it was stable for only less than 1 minute at the pulse duration of 68 fs, and therefore it seems to be difficult to generate much shorter pulse with the setup. We also have investigated Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 multi-gain media oscillation with the same pump source and OC. The pulse duration of as short as 56 fs with the average power of 380 mW has been achieved.

Fig. 4. The measured laser mode profiles of the leaking beam (at the point X in Fig. 2). (a) Before multi-pulse suppression: laser mode field diameters were 2900 × 1800 μm (vertical × horizontal). (b) After multi-pulse suppression: laser mode field diameters were 2060 × 1800 μm.
Fig. 5. Autocorrelation trace of the 53-fs pulses with the average power of 1 W. The experimental data (circles) and sech2-fitting curve (solid curve) are shown.

5. Discussion

The asitigmatism compensation of the cavity in the multi-pulse suppression regime (Fig. 4) is considered to be caused by the Kerr-lens effect. The cavity was aligned at an almost unstable state in the vertical direction where the cavity became very sensitive to the Kerr-lens effect, so that the significant change of the beam profile was apparent only in the vertical direction. Similar behaviors have been reported with Kerr-lens mode-locked operation with a Brewster configuration [3

3. P. Wagenblast, R. Ell, U. Morgner, F. Grawert, and F. X. Kärtner, “Diode-pumped 10-fs Cr3+:LiCAF laser,” Opt. Lett. 28, 1713–1715 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,6

6. A. Lagatsky, C. Brown, and W. Sibbett, “Highly efficient and low threshold diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KYW laser,” Opt. Express 12, 3928–3933 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-17-3928. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,24

24. M. Tokurakawa, A. Shirakawa, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped sub-100 fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Sc2O3 ceramic laser,” Opt. Lett. 32, 3382–3384 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,25

25. M. Tokurakawa, A. Shirakawa, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped 65-fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Lu2O3 and non-doped Y2O3 combined ceramic laser,” Opt. Lett. 33, 1380–1382 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The multi-pulse suppression increases the pulse energy and shortens the pulse duration several times, so that the Kerr-lens effect is strongly enhanced. From a different viewpoint, the Kerr-lens effect causes deeper gain and/or loss modulation with higher saturation energy than those by a SESAM, suppressing the multi-pulse instability [29

29. M. J. Lederer, B. Luther-Davies, H. H. Tan, C. Jagadish, N. N. Akhmediev, and J. M. Soto-Crespo, “Multipulse operation of a Ti:sapphire laser mode locked by ion-implanted semiconductor saturable-absorber mirror,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16, 895–904 (1999). [CrossRef]

]. The increase of the average power from 1.3 W to 1.5 W even with the low Q cavity (10% output coupling) is also the evidence of the large gain and/or loss modulation. Therefore, we believe the present operation is almost governed by Kerr-lens mode locking. As is in ref. 24, Kerr-lens mode locking without a SESAM will also be possible, with the penalty of reduced long-term (> 15 minute) stability.

Fig. 6. Spectrum of the 53-fs pulses (black curve) and normalized emission spectra of the Yb3+:Sc2O3 (blue curve) and Yb3+:Y2O3 (red curve) are shown.
Fig. 7. Autocorrelation trace of the 68-fs pulses from Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic and their spectrum (inset, black curve) and fluorescence spectrum (inset, red curve). The experimental data (points) and a sech2-fitting curve (solid curve) are shown

6. Conclusion

We have demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge femtosecond pulse generations from a directly LD pumped Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic multi-gain-media oscillator. The 66-fs pulses with an average power of 1.5 W and 53-fs pulses with an average power of 1 W were obtained. The 68-fs pulses with the average power of 540 mW were also obtained from Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic. We believe that the generation of much shorter pulses with a higher average power will be possible by further optimization. The multi-gain-media system will be very helpful for ultra-short-pulse lasers and amplifiers.

Acknowledgment

This research was partly supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and the Photon Frontier Network Program of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The support from Amada Foundation for Metal Technology is also appreciated.

References and links

1.

I. T. Sorokina, E. Sorokin, E. Wintner, A. Cassanho, H. P. Jenssen, and R. Szipöcs, “14-fs pulse generation in Kerr-lens mode-locked prismless Cr:LiSGaF and Cr:LiSAF lasers: observation of pulse self-frequency shift,” Opt. Lett. 22, 1716–1718 (1997). [CrossRef]

2.

S. Uemura and K. Torizuka, “Generation of 12-fs pulses from a diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Cr:LiSAF laser,” Opt. Lett. 24, 780–782 (1999). [CrossRef]

3.

P. Wagenblast, R. Ell, U. Morgner, F. Grawert, and F. X. Kärtner, “Diode-pumped 10-fs Cr3+:LiCAF laser,” Opt. Lett. 28, 1713–1715 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

J. Saikawa, Y. Sato, and T. Taira, “Passive mode locking of a mixed garnet Yb:Y3ScAl4O12 ceramic laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 5845 (2004). [CrossRef]

5.

H. Liu, J. Nees, and G. Mourou, “Diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KY(WO4)2 laser,” Opt. Lett. 26, 1723–1725 (2001). [CrossRef]

6.

A. Lagatsky, C. Brown, and W. Sibbett, “Highly efficient and low threshold diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KYW laser,” Opt. Express 12, 3928–3933 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-17-3928. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

F. Druon, S. Chénais, P. Raybaut, F. Balembois, P. Georges, R. Gaumé, G. Aka, B. Viana, S. Mohr, and D. Kopf, “Diode-pumped YbSr3Y(BO3)3 femtosecond laser,” Opt. Lett. 27, 197–199 (2002). [CrossRef]

8.

F. Druon, F. Balembois, and P. Georges, “Ultra-short-pulsed and highly-efficient diode-pumped Yb:SYS mode-locked oscillators,” Opt. Express 12, 5005–5012 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-20-5005. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

Y. Zaouter, J. Didierjean, F. Balembois, G. Leclin, F. Druon, P. Georges, J. Petit, P. Goldner, and B. Viana, “47-fs diode-pumped Yb3+:CaGdAlO4 laser,”Opt. Lett. 31, 119–121 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

J. Boudeile, F. Druon, M. Hanna, P. Georges, Y. Zaouter, E. Cormier, J. Petit, P. Goldner, and B. Viana, “Continuous-wave and femtosecond laser operation of Yb:CaGdAlO4 under high-power diode pumping,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1962–1964 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

A. A. Lagatsky, V. E. Kiselb, F. Baina, C. T. A. Browna, N. V. Kuleshovb, and W. Sibbetta, “Advances in femtosecond lasers having enhanced efficiencies,” Proc. of SPIE Vol. 6731, 673103, (2007).

12.

S. Rivier, A. Schmidt, C. Kränkel, R. Peters, K. Petermann, G. Huber, M. Zorn, M. Weyers, A. Klehr, G. Erbert, V. Petrov, and U. Griebner, “Ultrashort pulse Yb:LaSc3(BO3)4 mode-locked oscillator,” Opt. Express 15, 15539–15544 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-23-15539. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

U. Griebner, S. Rivier, V. Petrov, M. Zorn, G. Erbert, M. Weyers, X. Mateos, M. Aguiló, J. Massons, and F. Díaz, “Passively mode-locked Yb:KLu(WO4)2 oscillators,” Opt. Express 13, 3465–3470 (2005), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-13-9-3465. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

S. Rivier, X. Mateos, J. Liu, V. Petrov, U. Griebner, M. Zorn, M. Weyers, H. Zhang, J. Wang, and M. Jiang, “Passively mode-locked Yb:LuVO4 oscillator,” Opt. Express 14, 11668–11671 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-24-11668. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

A. Garcia-Cortes, J. M. Cano-Torres, M. D. Serrano, C. Cascales, C. Zaldo, S. Rivier, X. Mateos, U. Griebner, and V. Petrov, “Spectroscopy and Lasing of Yb-doped NaY(WO4)2: tunable and femtosecond mode-locked laser operation,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron 43, 758–764 (2007). [CrossRef]

16.

W. F. Krupke, “Ytterbium solid-state lasers-the first decade,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 6, 1287–1296 (2000). [CrossRef]

17.

X. Zhou, D. Yoshitomi, Y. Kobayashi, and K. Torizuka, “Generation of 28-fs pulses from a mode-locked ytterbium fiber oscillator,” Opt. Express 16, 7055–7059 (2008) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

E. Innerhofer, T. Südmeyer, F. Brunner, R. Häring, A. Aschwanden, R. Paschotta, U. Keller, C. Hönninger, and M. Kumkar, “60 W average power in 810-fs pulses from a thin-disk Yb:YAG laser,” Opt. Lett. 28, 367–369 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

F. Brunner, T. Südmeyer, E. Innerhofer, F. Morier-Genoud, R. Paschotta, V. E. Kisel, V. G. Shcherbitsky, N. V. Kuleshov, J. Gao, K. Contag, A. Giesen, and U. Keller “240-fs pulses with 22-W average power from a mode-locked thin-disk Yb:KY(WO4)2 laser,” Opt. Lett. 27, 1162–1164 (2002). [CrossRef]

20.

G. R. Holtom, “Mode-locked Yb:KGW laser longitudinally pumped by polarization-coupled diode bars,” Opt. Lett. 31, 2719–2721 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

U. Griebner, V. Petrov, K. Petermann, and V. Peters, “Passively mode-locked Yb:Lu2O3 laser,” Opt. Express 12, 3125–3130 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-14-3125. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

S. V. Marchese, C. R. E. Baer, R. Peters, C. Kränkel, A. G. Engqvist, M. Golling, D. J. H. C. Maas, K. Petermann, T. Südmeyer, G. Huber, and U. Keller, “Efficient femtosecond high power Yb:Lu2O3 thin disk laser,” Opt. Express 15, 16966–16971 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-25-16966. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

23.

M. Tokurakawa, K. Takaichi, A. Shirakawa, K. I. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped 188 fs mode-locked Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 071101 (2007). [CrossRef]

24.

M. Tokurakawa, A. Shirakawa, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped sub-100 fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Sc2O3 ceramic laser,” Opt. Lett. 32, 3382–3384 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

25.

M. Tokurakawa, A. Shirakawa, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Diode-pumped 65-fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Lu2O3 and non-doped Y2O3 combined ceramic laser,” Opt. Lett. 33, 1380–1382 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

S. Matsubara, M. Takama, M. Inoue, S. Kawato, and Y. Ishida, “Efficient Ultrashort-Pulse Generation Overcoming the Limit of Fluorescence Spectrum of the Gain Material,”in Frontiers in Optics, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper FTuT1.

27.

S. Uemura and K. Torizuka, “Kerr-lens mode-locked diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/International Quantum Electronics Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2004), paper CTuP36.

28.

Yu. Senatsky, A. Shirakawa, Y. Sato, J. Hagiwara, J. Lu, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, and T. Yanagitani, “Nonlinear refractive index of ceramic laser media and perspectives of their usage in a high-power laser-driver,” Laser Phys. Lett. 1, 500–506 (2004). [CrossRef]

29.

M. J. Lederer, B. Luther-Davies, H. H. Tan, C. Jagadish, N. N. Akhmediev, and J. M. Soto-Crespo, “Multipulse operation of a Ti:sapphire laser mode locked by ion-implanted semiconductor saturable-absorber mirror,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16, 895–904 (1999). [CrossRef]

30.

H. Yagi, K. Takaichi, K. Ueda, Y. Yamasaki, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, “The physical properties of composite YAG ceramics,” Laser Phys. 15, 1338 – 1344 (2005).

31.

M. Tsunekane and T. Taira, “High-power operation of diode edge-pumped, composite all-ceramic Yb:Y3Al 5O12 microchip laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121101 (2007) [CrossRef]

32.

A. A. Kaminskii, “Laser with combined active medium,” Sov. Phys. 13, 413–416 (1968).

OCIS Codes
(140.3580) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, solid-state
(140.4050) Lasers and laser optics : Mode-locked lasers
(140.3615) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, ytterbium

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: December 5, 2008
Revised Manuscript: January 31, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: February 15, 2009
Published: February 18, 2009

Citation
Masaki Tokurakawa, Akira Shirakawa, Ken-ichi Ueda, Hideki Yagi, Meichin Noriyuki, Takagimi Yanagitani, and Alexander A. Kaminskii, "Diode-pumped ultrashort-pulse generation based on Yb3+:Sc2O3 and Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic multi-gain-media oscillator," Opt. Express 17, 3353-3361 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-5-3353


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. I. T. Sorokina, E. Sorokin, E. Wintner, A. Cassanho, H. P. Jenssen, and R. Szipöcs, "14-fs pulse generation in Kerr-lens mode-locked prismless Cr:LiSGaF and Cr:LiSAF lasers: observation of pulse self-frequency shift," Opt. Lett. 22, 1716-1718 (1997). [CrossRef]
  2. S. Uemura and K. Torizuka, "Generation of 12-fs pulses from a diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Cr:LiSAF laser," Opt. Lett. 24, 780-782 (1999). [CrossRef]
  3. P. Wagenblast, R. Ell, U. Morgner, F. Grawert, and F. X. Kärtner, "Diode-pumped 10-fs Cr3+:LiCAF laser," Opt. Lett. 28, 1713-1715 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. J. Saikawa, Y. Sato, and T. Taira, "Passive mode locking of a mixed garnet Yb:Y3ScAl4O12 ceramic laser," Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 5845 (2004). [CrossRef]
  5. H. Liu, J. Nees, and G. Mourou, "Diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KY(WO4)2 laser," Opt. Lett. 26, 1723-1725 (2001). [CrossRef]
  6. A. Lagatsky, C. Brown, and W. Sibbett, "Highly efficient and low threshold diode-pumped Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KYW laser," Opt. Express 12, 3928-3933 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-17-3928. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. F. Druon, S. Chénais, P. Raybaut, F. Balembois, P. Georges, R. Gaumé, G. Aka, B. Viana, S. Mohr, and D. Kopf, "Diode-pumped YbSr3Y(BO3)3 femtosecond laser," Opt. Lett. 27, 197-199 (2002). [CrossRef]
  8. F. Druon, F. Balembois, and P. Georges, "Ultra-short-pulsed and highly-efficient diode-pumped Yb:SYS mode-locked oscillators," Opt. Express 12, 5005-5012 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-20-5005. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. Y. Zaouter, J. Didierjean, F. Balembois, G. Leclin, F. Druon, P. Georges, J. Petit, P. Goldner, and B. Viana, "47-fs diode-pumped Yb3+:CaGdAlO4 laser," Opt. Lett. 31, 119-121 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. J. Boudeile, F. Druon, M. Hanna, P. Georges, Y. Zaouter, E. Cormier, J. Petit, P. Goldner, and B. Viana, "Continuous-wave and femtosecond laser operation of Yb:CaGdAlO4 under high-power diode pumping," Opt. Lett. 32, 1962-1964 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. A. A. Lagatsky, V. E. Kiselb, F. Baina, C. T. A. Browna, N. V. Kuleshovb, and W. Sibbetta, "Advances in femtosecond lasers having enhanced efficiencies," Proc. of SPIE Vol. 6731, 673103, (2007).
  12. S. Rivier, A. Schmidt, C. Kränkel, R. Peters, K. Petermann, G. Huber, M. Zorn, M. Weyers, A. Klehr, G. Erbert, V. Petrov, and U. Griebner, "Ultrashort pulse Yb:LaSc3(BO3)4 mode-locked oscillator," Opt. Express 15, 15539-15544 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-23-15539. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. U. Griebner, S. Rivier, V. Petrov, M. Zorn, G. Erbert, M. Weyers, X. Mateos, M. Aguiló, J. Massons, and F. Díaz, "Passively mode-locked Yb:KLu(WO4)2 oscillators," Opt. Express 13, 3465-3470 (2005), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-13-9-3465. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. S. Rivier, X. Mateos, J. Liu, V. Petrov, U. Griebner, M. Zorn, M. Weyers, H. Zhang, J. Wang, and M. Jiang, "Passively mode-locked Yb:LuVO4 oscillator," Opt. Express 14, 11668-11671 (2006), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-14-24-11668. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. A. Garcia-Cortes, J. M. Cano-Torres, M. D. Serrano, C. Cascales, C. Zaldo, S. Rivier, X. Mateos U. Griebner, and V. Petrov, "Spectroscopy and Lasing of Yb-doped NaY(WO4)2: tunable and femtosecond mode-locked laser operation," IEEE J.Quantum Electron 43, 758-764 (2007). [CrossRef]
  16. W. F. Krupke, "Ytterbium solid-state lasers-the first decade," IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 6, 1287-1296 (2000). [CrossRef]
  17. X. Zhou, D. Yoshitomi, Y. Kobayashi, and K. Torizuka, "Generation of 28-fs pulses from a mode-locked ytterbium fiber oscillator," Opt. Express 16, 7055-7059 (2008) [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. E.  Innerhofer, T.  Südmeyer, F.  Brunner, R.  Häring, A.  Aschwanden, R.  Paschotta, U.  Keller, C.  Hönninger, and M.  Kumkar, "60 W average power in 810-fs pulses from a thin-disk Yb:YAG laser," Opt. Lett.  28, 367-369 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  19. F. Brunner, T. Südmeyer, E. Innerhofer, F. Morier-Genoud, R. Paschotta, V. E. Kisel, V. G. Shcherbitsky, N. V. Kuleshov, J. Gao, K. Contag, A. Giesen, and U. Keller "240-fs pulses with 22-W average power from a mode-locked thin-disk Yb:KY(WO4)2 laser," Opt. Lett. 27, 1162-1164 (2002). [CrossRef]
  20. G. R. Holtom, "Mode-locked Yb:KGW laser longitudinally pumped by polarization-coupled diode bars," Opt. Lett. 31, 2719-2721 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. U. Griebner, V. Petrov, K. Petermann, and V. Peters, "Passively mode-locked Yb:Lu2O3 laser," Opt. Express 12, 3125-3130 (2004), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-12-14-3125. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. S. V. Marchese, C. R. E. Baer, R. Peters, C. Kränkel, A. G. Engqvist, M. Golling, D. J. H. C. Maas, K. Petermann, T. Südmeyer, G. Huber, and U. Keller, "Efficient femtosecond high power Yb:Lu2O3 thin disk laser," Opt. Express 15, 16966-16971 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-25-16966. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  23. M. Tokurakawa, K. Takaichi, A. Shirakawa, K. I. Ueda, H. Yagi, T. Yanagitani, and A. A. Kaminskii, "Diode-pumped 188 fs mode-locked Yb3+:Y2O3 ceramic laser," Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 071101 (2007). [CrossRef]
  24. M.  Tokurakawa, A.  Shirakawa, K.  Ueda, H.  Yagi, T.  Yanagitani, and A. A.  Kaminskii, "Diode-pumped sub-100 fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Sc2O3 ceramic laser," Opt. Lett. 32, 3382-3384 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  25. M.  Tokurakawa, A.  Shirakawa, K.  Ueda, H.  Yagi, T.  Yanagitani, and A. A.  Kaminskii, "Diode-pumped 65-fs Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb3+:Lu2O3 and non-doped Y2O3 combined ceramic laser," Opt. Lett. 33, 1380-1382 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  26. S. Matsubara, M. Takama, M. Inoue, S. Kawato, and Y. Ishida, "Efficient Ultrashort-Pulse Generation Overcoming the Limit of Fluorescence Spectrum of the Gain Material," in Frontiers in Optics, OSA Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2008), paper FTuT1.
  27. S. Uemura and K. Torizuka, "Kerr-lens mode-locked diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser," in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics/International Quantum Electronics Conference and Photonic Applications Systems Technologies, Technical Digest (CD) (Optical Society of America, 2004), paper CTuP36.
  28. Yu. Senatsky, A. Shirakawa, Y. Sato, J. Hagiwara, J. Lu, K. Ueda, H. Yagi, and T. Yanagitani, "Nonlinear refractive index of ceramic laser media and perspectives of their usage in a high-power laser-driver," Laser Phys. Lett. 1, 500-506 (2004). [CrossRef]
  29. M. J. Lederer, B. Luther-Davies, H. H. Tan, C. Jagadish, N. N. Akhmediev, and J. M. Soto-Crespo, "Multipulse operation of a Ti:sapphire laser mode locked by ion-implanted semiconductor saturable-absorber mirror," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 16, 895-904 (1999). [CrossRef]
  30. H.  Yagi, K.  Takaichi, K.  Ueda, Y.  Yamasaki, T.  Yanagitani and A. A.  Kaminskii, "The physical properties of composite YAG ceramics," Laser Phys.  15, 1338 - 1344 (2005).
  31. M. Tsunekane and T. Taira, "High-power operation of diode edge-pumped, composite all-ceramic Yb:Y3Al 5O12 microchip laser," Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121101 (2007). [CrossRef]
  32. A. A. Kaminskii, "Laser with combined active medium," Sov. Phys. 13, 413-416 (1968).

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited