OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 17, Iss. 9 — Apr. 27, 2009
  • pp: 6968–6974
« Show journal navigation

A diode side-pumped KTiOAsO4 Raman laser

Zhaojun Liu, Qingpu Wang, Xingyu Zhang, Sasa Zhang, Jun Chang, Zhenhua Cong, Wenjia Sun, Guofan Jin, Xutang Tao, Youxuan Sun, and Shaojun Zhang  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 17, Issue 9, pp. 6968-6974 (2009)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.17.006968


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (133 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser is realized within a diode side-pumped acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Efficient nanosecond first-Stokes generations at 1091.4 nm are obtained with three 30-mm-long KTA crystals. Under an incident diode power of 60.9 W and a pulse repetition rate of 4 kHz, a first-Stokes power of 4.55 W is obtained, corresponding to a diode-to-Stokes conversion efficiency of 7.5%. The single pulse energy is up to 1.14 mJ and the peak power is 18.0 kW.

© 2009 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

In this paper, we report on a diode side-pumped KTA Raman laser, which generates higher pulse energy and higher peak power than those reported in [13

13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. A diode side-pumped acousto-optically (AO) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1064.2 nm is adopted as the pumping source. Three 30-mm-long x-cut KTA crystals are used in our experiments. Intracavity first-Stokes KTA Raman lasers were realized with one, two and three crystals, respectively. And the strongest Raman shift of KTA (234 cm-1) is used. When three KTA crystals are used, a first-Stokes power of 4.55 W is obtained with an incident diode power of 60.9 W and a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 4 kHz. The pulse energy is 1.14 mJ and peak power is 18.0 kW. The conversion efficiency from diode power to the first-Stokes power (diode-to-Stokes conversion efficiency) is 7.5%. The wavelength of the first-Stokes line is measured to be 1091.4 nm.

2. Experimental setup

Fig. 1. Schematic diagram of the diode side-pumped acousto-optically Q-switched intracavity KTA Raman laser: RM-rear mirror; OC-output coupler; AO- acousto-optical; BPF-band-pass filter.

The configuration of the KTiOAsO4 Raman laser is shown in Fig. 1. The coatings of the cavity mirrors were designed for the conversion at the first-Stokes line in an intracavity Raman conversion configuration. The rear mirror (RM) was a 3000 mm radius-of-curvature concave mirror and was coated for high-reflection (HR) at 1060–1100 nm (R>99.8%). The output coupler (OC) was a plane-plane mirror and was coated to be highly reflective at 1064 nm (R>99.7%) and partially reflective (PR) at 1091.4 nm (R=91.7%). The band-pass filter (BPF) could block off lasers with wavelengths from 300 to 1200 nm except a 5-nm band around 1091 nm.

The laser head (Northrop Grumman, USA) consisted of a Nd:YAG rod (0.6 at. %, ∅3 mm×63 mm), a cooling sleeve, a diffusive optical pump cavity and three diode array modules. The 46-mm-long AO Q-switch (Gooch and Housego) had anti-reflection (AR) coatings on both faces at 1064 nm (T>99.8%) and was driven at 27.12 MHz center frequency with the rf power of 50 W. Three x-cut KTA crystals with AR coatings on each face at 1060–1100 nm (T>99.8%) were used in our experiments. And the three KTA crystals were all of the size of 5×5×30 mm3. Intracavity first-Stokes KTA Raman lasers were realized with one, two and three crystals, respectively. When two or three KTA crystals were used, their z-axes were kept parallel with each other in order to take full advantage of the X(ZZ)X̄ Raman configurations. The Nd: YAG laser head and the Q-switch were water cooled with the water temperature of 20 °C. The KTA crystals were wrapped with indium foil and mounted in water-cooled copper blocks. The water temperature was also maintained at 20 °C. The Raman laser shared the same cavity with the fundamental laser and the cavity lengths were 176 mm, 208 mm and 240 mm for the cases with one, two and three KTA crystals, respectively. The laser powers were measured by an EPM 2000 power meter (Coherent Inc.). The spectral information was monitored by a wide-range optical spectrum analyzer (AQ 6315 A, Yokogawa). The pulse temporal behavior was recorded by a digital phosphor oscilloscope (TDS 5052B, Tektronix) and a fast p-i-n photodiode.

3. Results and discussions

In the result curves in this paper, the diode powers were obtained from the current-power curve supplied by the manufacturer. Under a diode power of 60.9 W (corresponding to a current of 14.0 A), the output Raman power was studied versus pulse repetition rates. The experimental results with one, two and three KTA crystals are shown in Fig. 2. Unlike that reported with diode end-pumped scheme in [13

13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

], where the most efficient Raman conversion had been observed at a PRR of 25 kHz, it was found in this experiment that efficient Raman conversions occurred at much lower PRRs, i.e. 4~5 kHz.

Fig. 2. Average output Raman power under a diode power of 60.9 W with respect to PRRs: squares-one KTA crystal; circles-two KTA crystals; triangles-three KTA crystals.

For Q-switched lasers, more population inversions at lower repetition rates are consumed by spontaneous emissions but not stimulated emissions. As a result, the lower repetition rates can only lead to higher pulse energy, and higher average power is obtained at higher PRRs. And for the Q-switched lasers with intracavity Raman conversions, SRS processes can only occur after the oscillating threshold condition being satisfied. So, there is an optimal repetition rate for the average power of an intracavity Raman laser. If the repetition rate is higher than the optimal one, Raman conversion will be weaken and even cannot occur. In this paper, the diode side-pumped scheme had much longer laser cavity than that of the diode end-pumped scheme, the mode sizes and losses were larger, and fundamental-wave pulse durations were longer. As a result, higher pulse energy and hence higher intensity were available only at lower PRRs compared to the diode end-pumped scheme in [13

13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. So, the efficient Raman conversions occurred at these lower PRRs, i.e. 4–5 kHz, where the intensity and Raman gain were high enough to counteract the losses.

Average output Raman power with one, two and three KTA crystals were studied at 4 kHz. And the results are shown in Fig. 3. For the case of one KTA crystal being used, due to the relatively low Raman gain, the oscillating threshold was as high as 33.5 W. In order to increase the intracavity Raman gain, we placed two KTA crystals in the cavity. As is shown, the oscillating threshold fell evidently to be less than 25 W. The highest output power was obtained with three KTA crystals. When the pump power was 60.9 W, we obtained the first-Stokes power of up to 4.55 W with a pulse width of 63.3 ns. The single pulse energy could be obtained to be 1.14 mJ and the peak power was 18.0 kW. When the pump power was higher than 60.9 W, the output Stokes power went saturated, so we didn’t give the results with higher pump power.

Fig. 3. Average output Raman power at 4 kHz with respect to the pumping diode power: squares-one KTA crystal; circles-two KTA crystals; triangles-three KTA crystals.

In the diode end-pumped intracavity KTA Raman laser in [13

13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

], the highest output average power of 1.38 W had been obtained. The output power of 4.55 W in this paper was much higher than that. Especially, the single pulse energy of 1.15 mJ was twenty times higher than the value of 0.055 mJ and the peak power of 18.0 kW was much higher than 8.5 kW reported in [13

13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. The diode end-pumped laser scheme was more compact and it was more efficient under low pump power, it induced more serious thermal lens effect under high pump power, however. So it was difficult to obtain high output average power limited by the thermal induced cavity instability. Higher output average power would be hopeful from this diode side-pumped scheme with higher quality KTA crystals and more reasonable cavity design.

Numerical analyses based on space-dependent rate equations are performed for theoretical studying of the Raman conversion thresholds. The pump light distribution is considered to be uniform inside the Nd:YAG rod. The initial population inversion density (IPID) in the cross-section of the rod, n(r, 0), is given by n(r, 0) = n(0,0)Θ(wP - r) [16

16. S. T. Li, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, P. Li, J. Chang, X. L. Zhang, and Z. H. Cong, “Modeling of Q-switched lasers with top-hat pump beam distribution,” Appl. Phys. B 88, 221–226 (2007). [CrossRef]

], with w(0,0) being the IPID on laser axis and Θ the Heaviside step function. wP is the average radius of the pump photon distribution. The intracavity fundamental and Stokes photons are assumed to be of Gaussian spatial distributions [17–18

17. X. Y. Zhang, S. Z. Zhao, Q. P. Wang, B. Ozygus, and H. Weber, “Modeling of diode-pumped actively Q-switched lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum. Electron. 35, 1912–1918 (1999). [CrossRef]

], i.e. ϕi(r,t) = ϕi(r,t)exp(-2r 2/w 2) where i=F or S for the fundamental and Stokes waves, respectively. We can obtain the following equation for the population inversion density [16–17

16. S. T. Li, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, P. Li, J. Chang, X. L. Zhang, and Z. H. Cong, “Modeling of Q-switched lasers with top-hat pump beam distribution,” Appl. Phys. B 88, 221–226 (2007). [CrossRef]

],

n(r,t)=n(0,0)Θ(wPr)exp[γσc·e2r2/wF2·F(t)],
(1)

where F(t) is a function defined for convenience and is given by F(t) = ∫0 t ϕF(0,t)dt. σ is the stimulated emission cross section, γ represents the inversion reduction factor of the laser crystal and c the light speed in vacuum.

Using Eq. (1) and Eqs. (23a, b) in [18

18. S. H. Ding, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, J. Chang, S. M. Wang, and Y. R. Liu, “Modeling of actively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 43, 722–729 (2007). [CrossRef]

], we can obtain the evolution equations of the fundamental and first-Stokes photon densities:

dϕF(0,t)dt=2σllctrγσcF(t)n(0,0)ϕF(0,t){exp[γσcexp(wP2/wF2)F(t)]exp[γσcF(t)]},
ϕF(0,t)τF1tr11+kFS2S(0,t)ϕF(0,t)
(2a)
dϕS(0,t)dt=1trkFS21+kFS2S(0,t)ϕF(0,t)+kSPkFS2ϕF(0,t)ϕS(0,t)τS.
(2b)

By neglecting the final inversion density, which was proved reasonable in solving the rate equations, the initial population inversion density could be obtained by [19

19. W. Koechner, Solid-State Laser Engineering (Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1996)

]

n(0,0)=τuR(0){1exp[1/(τuf)]},
(3)

where τu was the upper level lifetime of Nd and f stood for the PRR. R(0) was the pumping rate given by [20–21

20. S. Fujikawa, T. Kojima, and K. Yasui, “High-power and high-efficiency operation of a CW-diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG rod laser,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 3, 40–44 (1997). [CrossRef]

],

R(0)=PinηP/(hνPπwP2llc),
(4)

In the calculations, wP was 1.25 mm, g was 2.0 cm/GW [13

13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

], τu was 250 μs for the 0.6 at. % Nd-doped YAG [22

22. D. C. Brown, “Heat, fluorescence, and stimulated-emission power densities and fractions in Nd:YAG,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 34, 560–572 (1998). [CrossRef]

], round-trip losses induced by one KTA crystal were determined to be 0.015 and round-trip losses induced by surface reflections were 0.008. The thermal induced round-trip losses were determined to be 0.036. The focal length of the thermal lens in Nd:YAG rod was measured to be 1400 mm and that in KTA crystal was determined to be 2000 mm. The calculated Raman conversion thresholds for the cases with one, two and three KTA crystals were 28.8 W, 24.8 W and 25.0 W, respectively. This was in good agreement with the experimental results in Fig. 3. The oscillating threshold with three KTA crystals was higher than that with two crystals. The configuration with three KTA crystals greatly improved the Raman gain, but it induced larger absorption losses. We didn’t try experimental configurations with more than three crystals.

For the case of three KTA crystals being used, we studied the output Raman power with respect to diode power at different PRRs. The results are shown in Fig. 4. It was found the oscillating threshold increased dramatically with the PRR rising. At 4 kHz, the threshold was less than 25 W and the value was higher than 33 W at 6 kHz.

Fig. 4. Average output Raman power with three KTA crystals with respect to the pumping diode power: squares-4 kHz; circles-5 kHz; triangles-6 kHz.

Optical spectra of the fundamental and Raman laser radiations are shown in Fig. 5. This figure corresponded to the case with a pump power of 60.9 W and a PRR of 4 kHz. A resolution of 0.2 nm of the spectrum analyzer was selected and every point was obtained on average by five measurements. The wavelength of the first-Stokes Raman laser was measured to be 1091.4 nm. And the linewidths (FWHM) of the fundamental and Raman laser radiations were determined to be 0.48 nm and 0.40 nm, respectively. In our experiments, no higher-order Stokes lines were observed.

Fig. 5. Optical spectra of the fundamental and Raman laser radiations.

As reported in [11

11. Y. T. Chang, Y. P. Huang, K. W Su, and Y. F. Chen, “Diode-pumped multi-frequency Q-switched laser with intracavity cascade Raman emission,” Opt. Express 16, 8286–8291 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-11-8286. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], the first, second, third and fourth Stokes waves were obtained from the cascade KTP Raman laser with the output power of 0.05 W, 0.61 W, 0.25 W and 0.11 W, respectively. The wavelengths were 1096 nm, 1129 nm, 1166 nm and 1204 nm, respectively, which were in agreement with the Stokes shift of 270 cm-1. We used KTA crystals as Raman medium in this paper and obtained an output power as high as 4.55 W. This power was much higher than all the KTP and KTA Raman lasers reported before. In addition, KTA has a smaller Stokes shift of 234 cm-1 and the wavelengths of the fundamental and first-Stokes waves in Fig. 5 showed good agreement with this. Through difference-frequency generation (DFG), two laser beams with smaller frequency difference will lead to longer THz wavelengths. So, the Raman laser source emitting two laser radiations with smaller Stokes shift would be of benefit to the THz-wave generations. And it is possible to generate fundamental and first-Stokes radiations simultaneously through KTA Raman lasers, as shown in [13

13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. This kind of laser source has potential applications as the DFG THz-wave source.

4. Conclusion

Efficient stimulated Raman scattering have been realized in KTiOAsO4 (KTA) crystals within a diode side-pumped acousto-optically (AO) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The Raman oscillation shared the same cavity with the fundamental wave. When three x-cut KTA crystals were used as the Raman media, a Raman power of 4.55 W was obtained under a diode power of 60.9 W and a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of 4 kHz. The diode-to-Stokes conversion efficiency was 7.7%. The single pulse energy was up to 1.14 mJ and the peak power was 18.0 kW. These results show that KTA Raman lasers have potential applications as laser sources for THz generations. Theoretical analyses have been performed to study the Raman conversion thresholds. Future study will focus on generating high-peak-power fundamental and first-Stokes radiations simultaneously.

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Science and Technology Development Program of Shandong Province (No. 2007GG10001026), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 60677027), and the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20060422025).

References and links

1.

J. Lee, H. M. Pask, P. Dekker, and J. A. Piper, “High efficiency, multi-Watt CW yellow emission from an intracavity-doubled self-Raman laser using Nd:GdVO4,” Opt. Express 16, 21958–21963 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-26-21958. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

S. T. Li, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, X. L. Zhang, Z. H. Cong, H. J. Zhang, and J. Y. Wang, “Diode-side-pumped intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG/BaWO4 Raman laser generating average output power of 3.14 W at 590 nm,” Opt. Lett. 32, 2951–2953 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

G. M. A. Gad, H. J. Eichler, and A. A. Kaminskii, “Highly efficient 1.3-μm second-Stokes PbWO4 Raman laser,” Opt. Lett. 28, 426–428 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

J. H. Huang, J. P. Lin, R. B. Su, J. H. Li, H. Zheng, C. H. Xu, F. Shi, Z. Z. Lin, J. Zhuang, W. R. Zeng, and W. X. Lin, “Short pulse eye-safe laser with a stimulated Raman scattering self-conversion based on a Nd:KGW crystal,” Opt. Lett. 32, 1096–1098 (2007). [CrossRef]

5.

N. Zong, Q. J. Cui, Q. L. Ma, X. F. Zhang, Y. F. Lu, C. M. Li, D. F. Cui, Z. Y. Xu, H. J. Zhang, and J. Y. Wang, “High average power 1.5 μm eye-safe Raman shifting in BaWO4 crystals,” Appl. Opt. 48, 7–10 (2009). [CrossRef]

6.

J. T. Murray, W. L. Austin, and R. C. Powell, “Intracavity Raman conversion and Raman beam cleanup,” Opt. Mater. 11, 353–371 (1999). [CrossRef]

7.

T. T. Basiev, M. E. Doroshenko, L. I. Ivleva, V. V. Osiko, V. V. Badikov, and D. V. Badikov, #x201C;Some new approaches for development of mid-IR laser sources,” Proc. of SPIE 6998, 69980P, (2008). [CrossRef]

8.

D. J. Spence and R. P. Mildren, “Mode locking using stimulated Raman scattering,” Opt. Express 15, 8170–8175 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-13-8170. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

N. Vermeulen, C. Debaes, P. Muys, and H. Thienpont, “Mitigating Heat Dissipation in Raman Lasers Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 093903 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

R. P. Mildren, D. W. Coutts, and D. J. Spence, “All-solid-state parametric Raman anti-Stokes laser at 508 nm,” Opt. Express 17, 810–818 (2009), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-2-810. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

Y. T. Chang, Y. P. Huang, K. W Su, and Y. F. Chen, “Diode-pumped multi-frequency Q-switched laser with intracavity cascade Raman emission,” Opt. Express 16, 8286–8291 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-11-8286. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

G. H. Watson, “Polarized Raman spectra of KTiOAsO4 and isomorphic nonlinear-optical crystals,” J. Raman Spectrosc. 22, 705–713 (1991). [CrossRef]

13.

Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser,” Appl. Phys. B 94, 585–588 (2009). [CrossRef]

14.

Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, S. S. Zhang, J. chang, H. Wang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, “1120 nm second-Stokes generation in KTiOAsO4,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6, 121–124 (2009). [CrossRef]

15.

K. Suizu, K. Miyamoto, T. Yamashita, and H. Ito, “High-power terahertz-wave generation using DAST crystal and detection using mid-infrared powermeter,” Opt. Lett. 32, 2885–2887 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

S. T. Li, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, P. Li, J. Chang, X. L. Zhang, and Z. H. Cong, “Modeling of Q-switched lasers with top-hat pump beam distribution,” Appl. Phys. B 88, 221–226 (2007). [CrossRef]

17.

X. Y. Zhang, S. Z. Zhao, Q. P. Wang, B. Ozygus, and H. Weber, “Modeling of diode-pumped actively Q-switched lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum. Electron. 35, 1912–1918 (1999). [CrossRef]

18.

S. H. Ding, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, J. Chang, S. M. Wang, and Y. R. Liu, “Modeling of actively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 43, 722–729 (2007). [CrossRef]

19.

W. Koechner, Solid-State Laser Engineering (Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1996)

20.

S. Fujikawa, T. Kojima, and K. Yasui, “High-power and high-efficiency operation of a CW-diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG rod laser,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 3, 40–44 (1997). [CrossRef]

21.

O. A. Louchev, Y. Urata, N. Saito, and S. Wada, “Computational model for operation of 2 μm co-doped Tm,Ho solid state lasers,” Opt. Express 15, 11903–11912 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-19-11903. [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

D. C. Brown, “Heat, fluorescence, and stimulated-emission power densities and fractions in Nd:YAG,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 34, 560–572 (1998). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(140.3480) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, diode-pumped
(140.3550) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, Raman
(190.5650) Nonlinear optics : Raman effect

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: February 17, 2009
Revised Manuscript: March 31, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: March 31, 2009
Published: April 13, 2009

Citation
Zhaojun Liu, Qingpu Wang, Xingyu Zhang, Sasa Zhang, Jun Chang, Zhenhua Cong, Wenjia Sun, Guofan Jin, Xutang Tao, Youxuan Sun, and Shaojun Zhang, "A diode side-pumped KTiOAsO4 Raman laser," Opt. Express 17, 6968-6974 (2009)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-9-6968


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. J. Lee, H. M. Pask, P. Dekker, and J. A. Piper, "High efficiency, multi-Watt CW yellow emission from an intracavity-doubled self-Raman laser using Nd:GdVO4," Opt. Express 16, 21958-21963 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-26-21958. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. S. T. Li, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, X. L. Zhang, Z. H. Cong, H. J. Zhang, and J. Y. Wang, "Diode-side-pumped intracavity frequency-doubled Nd:YAG/BaWO4 Raman laser generating average output power of 3.14 W at 590 nm," Opt. Lett. 32, 2951-2953 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. G. M. A. Gad, H. J. Eichler, and A. A. Kaminskii, "Highly efficient 1.3-?m second-Stokes PbWO4 Raman laser," Opt. Lett. 28, 426-428 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. J. H. Huang, J. P. Lin, R. B. Su, J. H. Li, H. Zheng, C. H. Xu, F. Shi, Z. Z. Lin, J. Zhuang, W. R. Zeng, and W. X. Lin, "Short pulse eye-safe laser with a stimulated Raman scattering self-conversion based on a Nd:KGW crystal," Opt. Lett. 32, 1096-1098 (2007). [CrossRef]
  5. N. Zong, Q. J. Cui, Q. L. Ma, X. F. Zhang, Y. F. Lu, C. M. Li, D. F. Cui, Z. Y. Xu, H. J. Zhang, and J. Y. Wang, "High average power 1.5 ?m eye-safe Raman shifting in BaWO4 crystals," Appl. Opt. 48, 7-10 (2009). [CrossRef]
  6. J. T. Murray, W. L. Austin, and R. C. Powell, "Intracavity Raman conversion and Raman beam cleanup," Opt. Mater. 11, 353-371 (1999). [CrossRef]
  7. T. T. Basiev, M. E. Doroshenko, L. I. Ivleva, V. V. Osiko, V. V. Badikov, and D. V. Badikov, "Some new approaches for development of mid-IR laser sources," Proc. of SPIE 6998, 69980P, (2008). [CrossRef]
  8. D. J. Spence and R. P. Mildren, "Mode locking using stimulated Raman scattering," Opt. Express 15, 8170-8175 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-13-8170. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. N. Vermeulen, C. Debaes, P. Muys, and H. Thienpont, "Mitigating Heat Dissipation in Raman Lasers Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering," Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 093903 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. R. P. Mildren, D. W. Coutts, and D. J. Spence, "All-solid-state parametric Raman anti-Stokes laser at 508 nm," Opt. Express 17, 810-818 (2009), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-17-2-810. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. Y. T. Chang, Y. P. Huang, K. W Su, and Y. F. Chen, "Diode-pumped multi-frequency Q-switched laser with intracavity cascade Raman emission," Opt. Express 16, 8286-8291 (2008), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-16-11-8286. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. G. H. Watson, "Polarized Raman spectra of KTiOAsO4 and isomorphic nonlinear-optical crystals," J. Raman Spectrosc. 22, 705-713 (1991). [CrossRef]
  13. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, Z. J. Liu, J. chang, H. Wang, S. S. Zhang, S. Z. Fan, W. J. Sun, G. F. Jin, X. T. Tao, S. J. Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, "A KTiOAsO4 Raman laser," Appl. Phys. B 94, 585-588 (2009). [CrossRef]
  14. Z. J. Liu, Q. P. Wang, X. Y. Zhang, S. S. Zhang, J. chang, H. Wang, S. Z.  Fan, W. J.  Sun, X. T.  Tao, S. J.  Zhang, and H. J. Zhang, "1120 nm second-Stokes generation in KTiOAsO4," Laser Phys. Lett. 6, 121-124 (2009). [CrossRef]
  15. K. Suizu, K. Miyamoto, T. Yamashita, and H. Ito, "High-power terahertz-wave generation using DAST crystal and detection using mid-infrared powermeter," Opt. Lett. 32, 2885-2887 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. S. T. Li, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, P. Li, J. Chang, X. L. Zhang and Z. H. Cong, "Modeling of Q-switched lasers with top-hat pump beam distribution," Appl. Phys. B 88, 221-226 (2007). [CrossRef]
  17. X. Y. Zhang, S. Z. Zhao, Q. P. Wang, B. Ozygus, and H. Weber, "Modeling of diode-pumped actively Q-switched lasers," IEEE J. Quantum. Electron. 35, 1912-1918 (1999). [CrossRef]
  18. S. H. Ding, X. Y. Zhang, Q. P. Wang, J. Chang, S. M. Wang, and Y. R. Liu, "Modeling of actively Q-switched intracavity Raman lasers," IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 43, 722-729 (2007). [CrossRef]
  19. W. Koechner, Solid-State Laser Engineering (Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1996)
  20. S. Fujikawa, T. Kojima, and K. Yasui, "High-power and high-efficiency operation of a CW-diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG rod laser," IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 3, 40-44 (1997). [CrossRef]
  21. O. A. Louchev, Y. Urata, N. Saito, and S. Wada, "Computational model for operation of 2 ?m co-doped Tm,Ho solid state lasers," Opt. Express 15, 11903-11912 (2007), http://www.opticsinfobase.org/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-15-19-11903. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  22. D. C. Brown, "Heat, fluorescence, and stimulated-emission power densities and fractions in Nd:YAG," IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 34, 560-572 (1998). [CrossRef]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited