OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 1 — Jan. 4, 2010
  • pp: 108–116
« Show journal navigation

Dispersion Engineering with Leaky-Mode Resonant Photonic Lattices

Robert Magnusson, Mehrdad Shokooh-Saremi, and Xin Wang  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 1, pp. 108-116 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.000108


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (634 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We investigate the dispersion properties of leaky-mode resonance elements with emphasis on slow-light applications. Using particle swarm optimization, we design three exemplary bandpass leaky-mode devices. A single-layer silicon-on-insulator leaky-mode element shows a time-delay peak of ~8 ps at the resonance wavelength. A double membrane element exhibits an average delay of ~6 ps over ~0.75 nm spectral bandwidth with a relatively flat dispersion response. By cascading five double-membrane elements, we achieve an accumulative delay of ~30 ps with a very flat dispersion response over ~0.5 nm bandwidth. Thus, we show that delay elements based on leaky-mode resonance, by proper design, exhibit large amount of delay yet very flat dispersion over appreciable spectral bandwidths, making them potential candidates for optical buffers, delay lines, and switches.

© 2010 OSA

1. Introduction and background

Optical delay lines have important roles in communication systems and in radio-frequency (RF) photonics. They are common in optical time-division multiplexed communication systems for synchronization and buffering and in RF phased arrays for beam steering [14

14. G. Lenz, B. J. Eggleton, C. K. Madsen, and R. E. Slusher, “Optical delay lines based on optical filters,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 37(4), 525–532 (2001). [CrossRef]

]. These delay lines are implemented, for example, as free-space links, fiber-based links, fiber-Bragg gratings, and ring resonators. The delay properties are based on the phase response of the medium or filter in which the delay line is implemented as discussed in detail by Lenz et al. in [14

14. G. Lenz, B. J. Eggleton, C. K. Madsen, and R. E. Slusher, “Optical delay lines based on optical filters,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 37(4), 525–532 (2001). [CrossRef]

]. Many examples of practical delay systems are given in [15

15. C. K. Madsen and G. Lenz, “Optical all-pass filters for phase response design with applications for dispersion compensation,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 10(7), 994–996 (1998). [CrossRef]

18

18. M. S. Rasras, C. K. Madsen, M. A. Cappuzzo, E. Chen, L. T. Gomez, E. J. Laskowski, A. Griffin, A. Wong-Foy, A. Gasparyan, A. Kasper, J. Le Grange, and S. S. Patel, “Integrated resonance-enhanced variable optical delay lines,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 17(4), 834–836 (2005). [CrossRef]

] using all-pass optical filters.

Advances in nanofabrication and nanolithography are placing the long-awaited photonic integrated circuit in view as an attainable goal. The all-optical networks of the future will bypass optical-to-electrical converters, thereby eliminating associated noise and considerably reducing the attendant bit error rates. As discussed by Parra and Lowell, all-optical processing requires slow-light-enabled synchronizers, buffers, switches, and multiplexers [19

19. E. Parra and J. R. Lowell, “Toward applications of slow light technology,” Opt. Photon. News, 40–45 (Nov. 2007).

]. The technology needed to generate these functions for mass deployment is not available today, but there is a considerable amount of research being devoted to develop it. Many means are currently used to realize these valuable slow-light applications in the laboratory. This includes stimulated (Brillouin, Raman) scattering in fibers, semiconductor optical amplifiers, 2D photonic crystals, atomic vapors, and high-finesse ring resonators that many groups are pursuing [19

19. E. Parra and J. R. Lowell, “Toward applications of slow light technology,” Opt. Photon. News, 40–45 (Nov. 2007).

].

In this paper, we introduce a new concept for slow-light applications. We envision compact chips that contain leaky-mode resonance elements capable of buffering light across considerable bandwidths. Our concept can be viewed as a counterpart to other small-footprint devices such as 2D photonic-crystal (PhC)-based micro-resonator chips that are receiving much attention [20

20. M. Notomi, E. Kuramochi, and T. Tanabe, “Large-scale arrays of ultrahigh-Q coupled nanocavities,” Nat. Photonics 2(12), 741–747 (2008). [CrossRef]

, 21

21. F. Xia, L. Sekaric, and Y. Vlasov, “Ultracompact optical buffers on a silicon chip,” Nat. Photonics 1(1), 65–71 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. These coupled-resonator optical waveguides (CROW) may contain hundreds of high-Q cavities within a PhC lattice. These cavities, formed by slightly offset lattice holes, are perhaps ~2000 nm in diameter. Experimentally, the structure can attain group velocity below 0.01c and long group delays as shown recently by Notomi et al. [20

20. M. Notomi, E. Kuramochi, and T. Tanabe, “Large-scale arrays of ultrahigh-Q coupled nanocavities,” Nat. Photonics 2(12), 741–747 (2008). [CrossRef]

].

Whereas the amplitude-based spectral response of leaky-mode elements has been studied extensively, their phase response has received less attention. We briefly review the relevant papers published so far; most of these apply the usual reflection-type resonance. Schreier et al. treated a sinusoidally modulated waveguide grating at oblique incidence, computing the phase variation of the reflectance near resonance relative to modulation strength [22

22. F. Schreier, M. Schmitz, and O. Bryngdahl, “Pulse delay at diffractive structures under resonance conditions,” Opt. Lett. 23(17), 1337–1339 (1998). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. They quantified the degree to which the structural parameters control the amount of delay achievable with computed values of delay ranging from sub-ps to ~40 ps depending on conditions [22

22. F. Schreier, M. Schmitz, and O. Bryngdahl, “Pulse delay at diffractive structures under resonance conditions,” Opt. Lett. 23(17), 1337–1339 (1998). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Using a finite-difference time-domain computational approach, Mirotznik et al. [23

23. M. S. Mirotznik, D. W. Prather, J. N. Mait, W. A. Beck, S. Shi, and X. Gao, “Three-dimensional analysis of subwavelength diffractive optical elements with the finite-difference time-domain method,” Appl. Opt. 39(17), 2871–2879 (2000). [CrossRef]

] evaluated the temporal response of a subwavelength dielectric grating that we designed previously as a reflection-type GMR element [24

24. S. Tibuleac and R. Magnusson, “Reflection and transmission guided-mode resonance filters,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14(7), 1617–1626 (1997). [CrossRef]

]. The model input pulse was Gaussian with center wavelength of 510 nm, spectral width of 5000 nm, and temporal pulse width of ~5 fs. They noted that the reflected energy persisted for ~1 ps after the incident field decayed [23

23. M. S. Mirotznik, D. W. Prather, J. N. Mait, W. A. Beck, S. Shi, and X. Gao, “Three-dimensional analysis of subwavelength diffractive optical elements with the finite-difference time-domain method,” Appl. Opt. 39(17), 2871–2879 (2000). [CrossRef]

]. Later, Suh et al. designed a 2D photonic-crystal-slab-type GMR transmission filter computing the resonance amplitude, transmission spectrum, and group delay. For a 1.2 μm thick slab, a peak delay of about 10 ps was obtained at 1550 nm; the spectral width of the response was ~0.8 nm [25

25. W. Suh and S. Fan, “All-pass transmission or flattop reflection filters using a single photonic crystal slab,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 84(24), 4905–4907 (2004). [CrossRef]

]. Nakagawa et al. presented a method to model ultra-short optical pulse propagation in periodic structures, based on the combination of Fourier spectrum decomposition and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) [26

26. W. Nakagawa, R. Tyan, P. Sun, F. Xu, and Y. Fainman, “Ultrashort pulse propagation in near-field periodic diffractive structures by use of rigorous coupled-wave analysis,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 18(5), 1072–1081 (2001). [CrossRef]

]. They simulated an incident pulse (167 fs) on a resonant grating supporting two modes and found that two pulses were transmitted with shape similar to the excitation pulse shape. Vallius et al. modeled spatial and temporal pulse deformations generated by GMR filters. They illuminated the structure with a Gaussian temporal pulse of 2 ps duration and 633 nm wavelength. Lateral spread and temporal decompression were observed in the reflected and transmitted pulses [27

27. T. Vallius, P. Vahimaa, and J. Turunen, “Pulse deformations at guided-mode resonance filters,” Opt. Express 10(16), 840–843 (2002). [PubMed]

]. As the spectrum of the pulse was not well accommodated by the GMR element, the reflection efficiency of the pulse was relatively low.

In this paper, we aim for results that reach considerably beyond these initial works. We show that GMR elements can be designed to provide a phase response suitable for slow-light applications. We provide examples of resonance structures operating in transmission as cascaded transmissive elements yield more compact geometry than reflective elements. We emphasize attainment of considerable time delay and flat dispersion. For ease of fabrication, we focus on elements that are locally one-dimensional (1D) although they may be contained within 2D photonic slabs as shown by examples.

2. Computational basics

In this paper, the examples presented consist of structures with one-dimensional (1D) binary modulation. For simplicity, it is assumed that the periodic layers are transversely infinite and the materials are lossless. The spectra and phase are calculated with computer codes based on rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) of wave propagation in periodic media [28

28. T. K. Gaylord and M. G. Moharam, “Analysis and applications of optical diffraction by gratings,” Proc. IEEE 73(5), 894–937 (1985). [CrossRef]

, 29

29. M. G. Moharam, D. A. Pommet, E. B. Grann, and T. K. Gaylord, “Stable implementation of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis for surface-relief gratings: Enhanced transmittance matrix approach,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 12(5), 1077–1086 (1995). [CrossRef]

]. We also use RCWA to compute the time response; we summarize the method as follows. A transform-limited TE-polarized Gaussian pulse is represented as
Ey(t)=E0exp[(tt0)2T2]exp[jω0(tt0)]
(1)
where E0 is the amplitude of the pulse; T is the temporal pulse width (T =Δτ(2ln2)-1/ 2; Δτ is the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of |Еy(t)|2); t0 is the pulse-peak offset; ω0 = 2πc/λ0 is the central angular frequency and c and λ0 are the speed of light and the wavelength in vacuum, respectively. To use RCWA for analysis, the incident Gaussian pulse is decomposed into its monochromatic Fourier components (plane waves), which is performed by the Fourier transformation and discretization. These discrete monochromatic components are then treated independently by our established RCWA analysis technique, which at a given incident angle provides the complex reflection coefficients R(ωn) (or R(λn)) and complex transmission coefficients T(ωn) (or T(λn)) of each diffraction order. In addition, the independent analysis of each monochromatic component can facilitate the inclusion of material dispersion effects. The reflected pulse ЕRn) and transmitted pulse ЕTn) in the frequency domain for a specific diffraction order are thus given by

ER(ωn)=Ey(ωn)R(ωn)
(2)
ET(ωn)=Ey(ωn)T(ωn)
(3)

To obtain the time domain representation of the reflected and transmitted pulses, an inverse Fourier transform is performed. Since the frequency domain representation of the fields is discrete and finite, a Riemann sum can take the place of the integral in the inverse Fourier transformation. In other words, the reflected and transmitted fields can be obtained by superimposing the resulting spectral components from Eqs. (2) and (3), assuming that the Fourier kernel is included in the expression for the fields ЕR(t; ωn) and ЕT(t; ωn).

Figure 1
Fig. 1 Flow chart of the computational procedure utilized to obtain the output pulse shapes in wavelength and time domains. FFT: Fast Fourier Transform, RCWA: Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis, and IFFT: Inverse Fast Fourier Transform.
clarifies the computational method. Utilizing this technique, we find the output pulse shape and its delay with respect to the input pulse over a wide range of pulse widths (~several fs to hundreds of ps). The time delay (τ) and delay dispersion (D) are calculated by
τ=(λ2/2πc)dϕ/dλ
(4)
D=dτ/dλ
(5)
where φ is the wavelength (λ)-dependent phase in reflection or transmission [2

2. A. Yariv, and P. Yeh, Photonics: Optical Electronics in Modern Communications, 6th edition, Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.

,14

14. G. Lenz, B. J. Eggleton, C. K. Madsen, and R. E. Slusher, “Optical delay lines based on optical filters,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 37(4), 525–532 (2001). [CrossRef]

].

3. Leaky-mode resonance dispersive device examples

As a first example, we provide a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) GMR transmission filter with 0.5 nm spectral width and minimal sidelobes. This filter is designed using the particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique [30

30. R. Eberhart, and J. Kennedy, “Particle swarm optimization,” in Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Neural Networks (IEEE, 1995) 1942–1948.

, 31

31. M. Shokooh-Saremi and R. Magnusson, “Particle swarm optimization and its application to the design of diffraction grating filters,” Opt. Lett. 32(8), 894–896 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. This device is illustrated in Fig. 2
Fig. 2 A schematic view of a subwavelength guided-mode resonance element under normal incidence. A single layer with thickness d, fill factors Fi, and a multi-part period Λ is shown. I, R, and T denote the incident wave, reflectance, and transmittance, respectively. TE polarized light has its electric field vector normal to the plane of incidence.
with parameters Λ = 979 nm, d = 465 nm, and a period that is divided into four parts with fill factors [F1, F2, F3, F4] = [0.071, 0.275, 0.399, 0.255]. Also, nH = 3.48, nS = 1.48, and nL = ninc = 1.0 (air). Figure 3(a)
Fig. 3 (a) Transmittance, phase, delay, and dispersion of a 0.25 nm-wide (FWHM) SOI GMR transmission filter. Λ=979 nm, d = 465 nm, and [F1, F2, F3, F4] = [0.071, 0.275, 0.399, 0.255]. (b), (c) Response of this filter to excitation with a pulse in wavelength and time domains, respectively.
shows the transmittance, phase response, delay, and dispersion of this filter under normal incidence with TE polarization. This filter provides delays as high as ~10 ps at the transmission resonance; however, the dispersion width is narrow and zero dispersion is obtainable only near 1524.5 nm. Figures 3(b) and (c) display the response of this filter to excitation with a pulse in the spectral (wavelength) and time domains, respectively. The input pulse has a width of 30 ps (FWHM) in time. The output pulse experiences a delay of ~8.25 ps with respect to the input pulse. It has reduced amplitude on account of the incomplete transmission and limited passband noted in Fig. 3(b).

By cascading the structure in Fig. 4, we can build a structure resembling a multi-cavity photonic crystal waveguide [20

20. M. Notomi, E. Kuramochi, and T. Tanabe, “Large-scale arrays of ultrahigh-Q coupled nanocavities,” Nat. Photonics 2(12), 741–747 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. To illustrate, we cascade five GMR subunits (NCavity = 5) with spacing dB= 5.0 μm. Figure 6(a)
Fig. 6 (a) Transmittance, phase, delay, and dispersion of a five-cavity GMR transmission filter. Λ = 1103.9 nm, d = 432.2 nm, [F1, F2, F3, F4] = [0.0626, 0.3013, 0.4576, 0.1785], dCavity = 2000 nm, dB = 5000 nm, and NCavity = 5. Pulse response of this filter (b) in wavelength, and (c) in time domain. The output pulse experiences a ~30 ps delay with respect to the input pulse.
shows the computed results. Although the high-transmission bandwidth is smaller than it is for the single-cavity structure, cascading the cells results in a flat delay response of ~30 ps over a ~0.5 nm wavelength band. Moreover, the flat low-dispersion response illustrates that such structures are promising for imposing constant (and almost dispersion-free) delays on optical pulses. Theoretically, this ~30 ps group delay for the ~34 μm long structure designed here corresponds to a group velocity of ~0.0038c. Figures 6(b) and (c) display the response of this filter to pulse excitation. The input pulse has a FWHM of 30 ps, and the output pulse preserves its shape with a delay of ~30 ps with respect to the input pulse. For comparison, Notomi et al. reported 75 ps delay with 60 cavities each being 2100 nm in diameter; the total structure length was 175 μm [20

20. M. Notomi, E. Kuramochi, and T. Tanabe, “Large-scale arrays of ultrahigh-Q coupled nanocavities,” Nat. Photonics 2(12), 741–747 (2008). [CrossRef]

].

4. Conclusions

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Y. Ding for his contributions in developing parts of the analysis codes used. This material is based, in part, upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. ECCS-0925774.

References and links

1.

J. D. Joannopoulos, R. D. Meade, and J. N. Winn, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light, Princeton, 1995.

2.

A. Yariv, and P. Yeh, Photonics: Optical Electronics in Modern Communications, 6th edition, Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.

3.

K. Sakoda, Optical Properties of Photonic Crystals, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2001.

4.

P. Vincent and M. Neviere, “Corrugated dielectric waveguides: A numerical study of the second-order stop bands,” Appl. Phys. (Berl.) 20(4), 345–351 (1979). [CrossRef]

5.

L. Mashev and E. Popov, “Zero order anomaly of dielectric coated gratings,” Opt. Commun. 55(6), 377–380 (1985). [CrossRef]

6.

E. Popov, L. Mashev, and D. Maystre, “Theoretical study of anomalies of coated dielectric gratings,” Opt. Acta (Lond.) 33, 607–619 (1986).

7.

G. A. Golubenko, A. S. Svakhin, V. A. Sychugov, and A. V. Tishchenko, “Total reflection of light from a corrugated surface of a dielectric waveguide,” Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 15(7), 886–887 (1985). [CrossRef]

8.

I. A. Avrutsky and V. A. Sychugov, “Reflection of a beam of finite size from a corrugated waveguide,” J. Mod. Opt. 36(11), 1527–1539 (1989). [CrossRef]

9.

R. Magnusson and S. S. Wang, “New principle for optical filters,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 61(9), 1022–1024 (1992). [CrossRef]

10.

S. S. Wang and R. Magnusson, “Theory and applications of guided-mode resonance filters,” Appl. Opt. 32(14), 2606–2613 (1993). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

Y. Ding and R. Magnusson, “Resonant leaky-mode spectral-band engineering and device applications,” Opt. Express 12(23), 5661–5674 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

Y. Ding and R. Magnusson, “Use of nondegenerate resonant leaky modes to fashion diverse optical spectra,” Opt. Express 12(9), 1885–1891 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

M. Shokooh-Saremi and R. Magnusson, “Wideband leaky-mode resonance reflectors: influence of grating profile and sublayers,” Opt. Express 16(22), 18249–18263 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

G. Lenz, B. J. Eggleton, C. K. Madsen, and R. E. Slusher, “Optical delay lines based on optical filters,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 37(4), 525–532 (2001). [CrossRef]

15.

C. K. Madsen and G. Lenz, “Optical all-pass filters for phase response design with applications for dispersion compensation,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 10(7), 994–996 (1998). [CrossRef]

16.

G. Lenz and C. K. Madsen, “General optical all-pass filter structures for dispersion control,” J. Lightwave Technol. 17(7), 1248–1254 (1999). [CrossRef]

17.

C. K. Madsen, G. Lenz, A. J. Bruce, M. A. Cappuzzo, L. T. Gomez, and R. E. Scotti, “Integrated all-pass filters for tunable dispersion and dispersion slope compensation,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11(12), 1623–1625 (1999). [CrossRef]

18.

M. S. Rasras, C. K. Madsen, M. A. Cappuzzo, E. Chen, L. T. Gomez, E. J. Laskowski, A. Griffin, A. Wong-Foy, A. Gasparyan, A. Kasper, J. Le Grange, and S. S. Patel, “Integrated resonance-enhanced variable optical delay lines,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 17(4), 834–836 (2005). [CrossRef]

19.

E. Parra and J. R. Lowell, “Toward applications of slow light technology,” Opt. Photon. News, 40–45 (Nov. 2007).

20.

M. Notomi, E. Kuramochi, and T. Tanabe, “Large-scale arrays of ultrahigh-Q coupled nanocavities,” Nat. Photonics 2(12), 741–747 (2008). [CrossRef]

21.

F. Xia, L. Sekaric, and Y. Vlasov, “Ultracompact optical buffers on a silicon chip,” Nat. Photonics 1(1), 65–71 (2007). [CrossRef]

22.

F. Schreier, M. Schmitz, and O. Bryngdahl, “Pulse delay at diffractive structures under resonance conditions,” Opt. Lett. 23(17), 1337–1339 (1998). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

23.

M. S. Mirotznik, D. W. Prather, J. N. Mait, W. A. Beck, S. Shi, and X. Gao, “Three-dimensional analysis of subwavelength diffractive optical elements with the finite-difference time-domain method,” Appl. Opt. 39(17), 2871–2879 (2000). [CrossRef]

24.

S. Tibuleac and R. Magnusson, “Reflection and transmission guided-mode resonance filters,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14(7), 1617–1626 (1997). [CrossRef]

25.

W. Suh and S. Fan, “All-pass transmission or flattop reflection filters using a single photonic crystal slab,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 84(24), 4905–4907 (2004). [CrossRef]

26.

W. Nakagawa, R. Tyan, P. Sun, F. Xu, and Y. Fainman, “Ultrashort pulse propagation in near-field periodic diffractive structures by use of rigorous coupled-wave analysis,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 18(5), 1072–1081 (2001). [CrossRef]

27.

T. Vallius, P. Vahimaa, and J. Turunen, “Pulse deformations at guided-mode resonance filters,” Opt. Express 10(16), 840–843 (2002). [PubMed]

28.

T. K. Gaylord and M. G. Moharam, “Analysis and applications of optical diffraction by gratings,” Proc. IEEE 73(5), 894–937 (1985). [CrossRef]

29.

M. G. Moharam, D. A. Pommet, E. B. Grann, and T. K. Gaylord, “Stable implementation of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis for surface-relief gratings: Enhanced transmittance matrix approach,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 12(5), 1077–1086 (1995). [CrossRef]

30.

R. Eberhart, and J. Kennedy, “Particle swarm optimization,” in Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Neural Networks (IEEE, 1995) 1942–1948.

31.

M. Shokooh-Saremi and R. Magnusson, “Particle swarm optimization and its application to the design of diffraction grating filters,” Opt. Lett. 32(8), 894–896 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(050.1950) Diffraction and gratings : Diffraction gratings
(130.2790) Integrated optics : Guided waves
(260.2030) Physical optics : Dispersion
(050.6624) Diffraction and gratings : Subwavelength structures

ToC Category:
Photonic Crystals

History
Original Manuscript: September 17, 2009
Revised Manuscript: October 20, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: November 5, 2009
Published: December 22, 2009

Citation
Robert Magnusson, Mehrdad Shokooh-Saremi, and Xin Wang, "Dispersion Engineering with Leaky-Mode Resonant Photonic Lattices," Opt. Express 18, 108-116 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-1-108


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. J. D. Joannopoulos, R. D. Meade, and J. N. Winn, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light, Princeton, 1995.
  2. A. Yariv, and P. Yeh, Photonics: Optical Electronics in Modern Communications, 6th edition, Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.
  3. K. Sakoda, Optical Properties of Photonic Crystals, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 2001.
  4. P. Vincent, M. Neviere, “Corrugated dielectric waveguides: A numerical study of the second-order stop bands,” Appl. Phys. (Berl.) 20(4), 345–351 (1979). [CrossRef]
  5. L. Mashev, E. Popov, “Zero order anomaly of dielectric coated gratings,” Opt. Commun. 55(6), 377–380 (1985). [CrossRef]
  6. E. Popov, L. Mashev, D. Maystre, “Theoretical study of anomalies of coated dielectric gratings,” Opt. Acta (Lond.) 33, 607–619 (1986).
  7. G. A. Golubenko, A. S. Svakhin, V. A. Sychugov, A. V. Tishchenko, “Total reflection of light from a corrugated surface of a dielectric waveguide,” Sov. J. Quantum Electron. 15(7), 886–887 (1985). [CrossRef]
  8. I. A. Avrutsky, V. A. Sychugov, “Reflection of a beam of finite size from a corrugated waveguide,” J. Mod. Opt. 36(11), 1527–1539 (1989). [CrossRef]
  9. R. Magnusson, S. S. Wang, “New principle for optical filters,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 61(9), 1022–1024 (1992). [CrossRef]
  10. S. S. Wang, R. Magnusson, “Theory and applications of guided-mode resonance filters,” Appl. Opt. 32(14), 2606–2613 (1993). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. Y. Ding, R. Magnusson, “Resonant leaky-mode spectral-band engineering and device applications,” Opt. Express 12(23), 5661–5674 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. Y. Ding, R. Magnusson, “Use of nondegenerate resonant leaky modes to fashion diverse optical spectra,” Opt. Express 12(9), 1885–1891 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. M. Shokooh-Saremi, R. Magnusson, “Wideband leaky-mode resonance reflectors: influence of grating profile and sublayers,” Opt. Express 16(22), 18249–18263 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. G. Lenz, B. J. Eggleton, C. K. Madsen, R. E. Slusher, “Optical delay lines based on optical filters,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 37(4), 525–532 (2001). [CrossRef]
  15. C. K. Madsen, G. Lenz, “Optical all-pass filters for phase response design with applications for dispersion compensation,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 10(7), 994–996 (1998). [CrossRef]
  16. G. Lenz, C. K. Madsen, “General optical all-pass filter structures for dispersion control,” J. Lightwave Technol. 17(7), 1248–1254 (1999). [CrossRef]
  17. C. K. Madsen, G. Lenz, A. J. Bruce, M. A. Cappuzzo, L. T. Gomez, R. E. Scotti, “Integrated all-pass filters for tunable dispersion and dispersion slope compensation,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 11(12), 1623–1625 (1999). [CrossRef]
  18. M. S. Rasras, C. K. Madsen, M. A. Cappuzzo, E. Chen, L. T. Gomez, E. J. Laskowski, A. Griffin, A. Wong-Foy, A. Gasparyan, A. Kasper, J. Le Grange, S. S. Patel, “Integrated resonance-enhanced variable optical delay lines,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 17(4), 834–836 (2005). [CrossRef]
  19. E. Parra and J. R. Lowell, “Toward applications of slow light technology,” Opt. Photon. News, 40–45 (Nov. 2007).
  20. M. Notomi, E. Kuramochi, T. Tanabe, “Large-scale arrays of ultrahigh-Q coupled nanocavities,” Nat. Photonics 2(12), 741–747 (2008). [CrossRef]
  21. F. Xia, L. Sekaric, Y. Vlasov, “Ultracompact optical buffers on a silicon chip,” Nat. Photonics 1(1), 65–71 (2007). [CrossRef]
  22. F. Schreier, M. Schmitz, O. Bryngdahl, “Pulse delay at diffractive structures under resonance conditions,” Opt. Lett. 23(17), 1337–1339 (1998). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  23. M. S. Mirotznik, D. W. Prather, J. N. Mait, W. A. Beck, S. Shi, X. Gao, “Three-dimensional analysis of subwavelength diffractive optical elements with the finite-difference time-domain method,” Appl. Opt. 39(17), 2871–2879 (2000). [CrossRef]
  24. S. Tibuleac, R. Magnusson, “Reflection and transmission guided-mode resonance filters,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14(7), 1617–1626 (1997). [CrossRef]
  25. W. Suh, S. Fan, “All-pass transmission or flattop reflection filters using a single photonic crystal slab,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 84(24), 4905–4907 (2004). [CrossRef]
  26. W. Nakagawa, R. Tyan, P. Sun, F. Xu, Y. Fainman, “Ultrashort pulse propagation in near-field periodic diffractive structures by use of rigorous coupled-wave analysis,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 18(5), 1072–1081 (2001). [CrossRef]
  27. T. Vallius, P. Vahimaa, J. Turunen, “Pulse deformations at guided-mode resonance filters,” Opt. Express 10(16), 840–843 (2002). [PubMed]
  28. T. K. Gaylord, M. G. Moharam, “Analysis and applications of optical diffraction by gratings,” Proc. IEEE 73(5), 894–937 (1985). [CrossRef]
  29. M. G. Moharam, D. A. Pommet, E. B. Grann, T. K. Gaylord, “Stable implementation of the rigorous coupled-wave analysis for surface-relief gratings: Enhanced transmittance matrix approach,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 12(5), 1077–1086 (1995). [CrossRef]
  30. R. Eberhart, and J. Kennedy, “Particle swarm optimization,” in Proceedings of IEEE Conference on Neural Networks (IEEE, 1995) 1942–1948.
  31. M. Shokooh-Saremi, R. Magnusson, “Particle swarm optimization and its application to the design of diffraction grating filters,” Opt. Lett. 32(8), 894–896 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited