OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 16 — Aug. 2, 2010
  • pp: 17165–17179
« Show journal navigation

Nonlinear pulsed excitation of high-Q optical modes of plasmonic nanocavities

Claudiu G. Biris and Nicolae C. Panoiu  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 16, pp. 17165-17179 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.017165


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (1522 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

We present a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis of the physical mechanisms pertaining to the nonlinear pulsed excitation of optical modes in plasmonic cavities made of metallic nanowires. Our analysis is based on extensive numerical simulations carried out both in the frequency and time domains. The numerical algorithm used in our study is based on the multiple scattering method and allows us to include in our analysis the effects of both the surface and bulk nonlinear polarizations generated at the second harmonic (SH). In particular, we investigate the physical roperties of plasmonic modes excited at the SH as the result of the interaction of femtosecond optical pulses with plasmonic nanocavities. We show that such cavities have two distinct types of modes, namely, plasmonic cavity modes and multipole plasmon modes generated via the hybridization of modes of single nanowires. Our analysis reveals that the properties of the latter modes depend only weakly on the cavity geometry, whereas the lifetime and quality factor of plasmonic cavity modes vary considerably with the system parameters.

© 2010 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

In recent years, we have witnessed a paradigmatic shift in the research methodologies used in studying the physical properties of electromagnetic media. This development can be primarily traced to the advent of the research field of metamaterials and its applications to optics and materials science. Metamaterials are a new class of electromagnetic media, whose basic unit cell is artificially engineered so as the optical medium possesses pre-designed macroscopic physical properties tailored for specific applications. In particular, by engineering the material parameters and geometry of the unit cell at a scale that is comparable to or smaller than the operating wavelength, a suite of new materials with remarkable properties have recently emerged. Examples of such optical media include materials that are magnetically active at terahertz and optical frequencies [1

1. S. Linden, C. Enkrich, M. Wegener, J. Zhou, T. Koschny, and C. M. Soukoulis, “Magnetic Response of Metamaterials at 100 Terahertz,” Science 306, 1351–1353 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], materials with negative index of refraction [2

2. R. A. Shelby, D. R. Smith, and S. Schultz, “Experimental Verification of a Negative Index of Refraction,” Science 292, 77–79 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 3

3. S. Zhang, W. Fan, N. C. Panoiu, K. J. Malloy, R. M. Osgood, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Experimental Demonstration of Near-Infrared Negative-Index Metamaterials,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 137404 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 4

4. V. M. Shalaev, W. Cai, U. K. Chettiar, H-K. Yuan, A. K. Sarychev, V. P. Drachev, and A. V. Kildishev, “Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials,” Opt. Lett. 30, 3356–3358 (2005). [CrossRef]

], and homogeneous or periodic media with low-index of refraction [5

5. R. W. Ziolkowski, “Propagation in and scattering from a matched metamaterial having a zero index of refraction,” Phys. Rev. E 70, 046608 (2004). [CrossRef]

, 6

6. N. C. Panoiu, R. M. Osgood, S. Zhang, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Zero-n bandgap in photonic crystal superlattices,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23, 506–513 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 7

7. S. Kocaman, R. Chatterjee, N. C. Panoiu, J. F. McMillan, M. B. Yu, R. M. Osgood, D. L. Kwong, and C. W. Wong, “Observation of Zeroth-Order Band Gaps in Negative-Refraction Photonic Crystal Superlattices at Near-Infrared Frequencies,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 203905 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

It is well known that metallic structures support localized and propagating electromagnetic excitations, also known as surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes [8

8. U. Kreibig and M. Vollmer, Optical Properties of Metal Clusters (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1995).

, 9

9. A. V. Zayats, I. I. Smolyaninov, and A. A. Maradudin, “Nano-optics of surface plasmon polaritons,” Phys. Rep. 408, 131–314 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. As a consequence of the resonant excitation of these modes the electromagnetic field in the vicinity of metal surfaces is strongly enhanced and therefore the macroscopic properties of metal-based metamaterials are significantly affected [10

10. W. Fan, S. Zhang, N. C. Panoiu, A. Abdenour, S. Krishna, R. M. Osgood, K. J. Malloy, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Second Harmonic Generation from a Nanopatterned Isotropic Nonlinear Material,” Nano Lett. 6, 1027–1030 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 11

11. J. A. H. van Nieuwstadt, M. Sandtke, R. H. Harmsen, F. B. Segerink, J. C. Prangsma, S. Enoch, and L. Kuipers, “Strong Modification of the Nonlinear Optical Response of Metallic Subwavelength Hole Arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 146102 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 12

12. L. Cao, N. C. Panoiu, and R. M. Osgood, “Surface second-harmonic generation from surface plasmon waves scattered by metallic nanostructures,” Phys. Rev. B 75, 205401 (2007). [CrossRef]

, 13

13. Y. Zeng, W. Hoyer, J. J. Liu, S. W. Koch, and J. V. Moloney, “Classical theory for second-harmonic generation from metallic nanoparticles,” Phys. Rev. B 79, 235109 (2009). [CrossRef]

, 14

14. I. I. Smolyaninov, A. V. Zayats, A. Gungor, and C. C. Davis, “Single-Photon Tunneling via Localized Surface Plasmons,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 187402 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 15

15. X. W. Wang, G. C. Schatz, and S. K. Gray, “Ultrafast pulse excitation of a metallic nanosystem containing a Kerr nonlinear material,” Phys. Rev. B 74, 195439 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. This effect has been successfully employed in several applications, i.e., surface-enhanced Ramman scattering [16

16. K. Kneipp, Y. Wang, H. Kneipp, L. T. Perelman, I. Itzkan, R. R. Dasari, and M. S. Feld, “Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS),” Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1667 (1997). [CrossRef]

], nanoscale optical antennae [17

17. T. H. Taminiau, R. J. Moerland, F. B. Segerink, L. Kuipers, and N. F. van Hulst, “λ/4 Resonance of an Optical Monopole Antenna Probed by Single Molecule Fluorescence,” Nano Lett. 7, 28 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], and metallic nanotips for near-field optical microscopy [18

18. B. Knoll and F. Keilmann, “Near-field probing of vibrational absorption for chemical microscopy,” Nature (London) 399, 134–137 (1999). [CrossRef]

, 19

19. R. M. Roth, N. C. Panoiu, M. M. Adams, R. M. Osgood, C. C. Neacsu, and M. B. Raschke, “Resonant-plasmon field enhancement from asymmetrically illuminated conical metallic-probe tips,” Opt. Express 14, 2921–2913 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In addition, enhancement of the second harmonic (SH) field intensity as large as 108 has been observed when employing metallic nanoparticles [20

20. S. I. Bozhevolnyi, J. Beermann, and V. Coello, “Direct Observation of Localized Second-Harmonic Enhancement in Random Metal Nanostructures,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 197403 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. It is thus clear that achieving a complete haracterization of nonlinear effects occurring at the nanoscale represents an important step towards designing future subwavelength active nanodevices, which can be operated at low optical power.

Fig. 1. Schematic of the system geometry.

2. Description of the numerical method

We begin our brief outline of the numerical approach used in our study with a description of the geometry of the system we investigate. It consists of an ensemble of N parallel, infinitely long cylinders, Cj, j = 1, 2, …, N, embedded in a background medium with electric permittivity εb and magnetic permeability µb (in our calculations we assume µb = µ 0). The location and physical characteristics of the cylinders are defined by their polar coordinates (rjj), radius Rj, electric permittivity εj(w), magnetic permeability µj, and surface second-order susceptibility, χ^s,j (2), their axis being perpendicular to the xy-plane (see Fig. 1). Furthermore, the position of the center of the k-th cylinder, specified in a coordinate system with the origin in Oj, is defined by the polar coordinates (rjk,φjk), whereas the position of an arbitrary point P, defined with respect to the coordinate systems with the origin in O and Oj, is specified by the polar coordinates (rP,φP) and (rjPjP), respectively. In what follows, we assume that the wave vector k 0 of the incoming pulse lies in the xy-plane, the angle between k 0 and the x-axis being ϕ 0. Moreover, we consider only the case of TE polarized light since in the case of the TM polarization no SH is generated. Under these conditions, the only nonzero field components are Hz, Ex, and Ey.

Hzinc(r,t)=ei(k0·rω0t)12πH˜zinc(ω¯)eiω¯tdω¯,
(1)

where ω 0 is the pulse carrier frequency and incz is the Fourier transform of the pulse envelope.In our calculations we have considered input pulses with Gaussian envelopes,

Hzinc(t)=H0et22T02eiω0t,
(2)

H˜zinc(ωω0)=H0πT0eT02(ωω0)24,
(3)

where the physical angular frequency ω = ω¯ + ω 0. For the sake of simplicity, we have assumed that the center of the pulse would reach the origin of the coordinate system at t = 0.

The second step of our method consists in solving the scattering problem for a monochromatic plane wave, at both the FF and SH. To this end, we used a numerical method based on the MSM formalism, which has been successfully employed in the study of linear scattering from arrays of cylinders [38

38. E. Centeno and D. Felbacq, “Rigorous vector diffraction of electromagnetic waves by bidimensional photonic crystals,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 320–327 (2000). [CrossRef]

] and nonlinear scattering from a single cylinder [39

39. J. I. Dadap, “Optical second-harmonic scattering from cylindrical particles,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 205322 (2008). [CrossRef]

, 40

40. C. I. Valencia, E. R. Mendez, and B. S. Mendoza, “Second-harmonic generation in the scattering of light by an infinite cylinder,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21, 36–44 (2004). [CrossRef]

], a 2D object of arbitrary shape [41

41. C. I. Valencia, E. R. Mendez, and B. S. Mendoza, “Second-harmonic generation in the scattering of light by two-dimensional particles,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20, 2150–2161 (2003). [CrossRef]

], and arrays of cylinders embedded in a nonlinear medium [42

42. E. Centeno and D. Felbacq, “Second-harmonic emission in two-dimensional photonic crystals,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23, 2257–2264 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. Thus, we use a modified version of the nonlinear MSM algorithm [36

36. C. G. Biris and N. C. Panoiu, “Second harmonic generation in metamaterials based on homogenous centrosymmetric nanowires,” Phys. Rev. B 81, 195102 (2010). [CrossRef]

], which allows one to include in the theoretical formalism the effects induced by both the surface and bulk nonlinear polarizations. This feature is particularly important in the case of centrosymmetric media, such as metals, since in this case the local, bulk nonlinear polarization vanishes and therefore surface nonlinear effects become dominant [43

43. J. Rudnick and E. A. Stern, “Second-harmonic Radiation from Metal Surfaces,” Phys. Rev. B 4, 4274 (1971). [CrossRef]

, 44

44. J. I. Dadap, J. Shan, K. B. Eisenthal, and T. F. Heinz, “Second-Harmonic Rayleigh Scattering from a Sphere of Centrosymmetric Material,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4045 (1999). [CrossRef]

]. Thus, the numerical algorithm consists of two steps. First, the scattered field at the FF is calculated and it is then used to compute the total nonlinear polarization at the SH. This source polarization is then used to calculate the SH field.

Without being a constraint imposed by the MSM formalism, we assume in our study that all cylinders are made of the same material, namely, Ag. Moreover, we assume that the permittivity of the metal is described by the Drude model, ε(ω)=ε0[1ωp2ω(ω+iv)] , where ωp = 1.35× 1016 rad/s is the plasma frequency and ν = 2.73×1013 s−1 is the damping frequency [45

45. M. A. Ordal, R. J. Bell, R. W. Alexander, Jr, L. L. Long, and M. R. Querry “Optical properties of fourteen metals in the infrared and far infrared: Al, Co, Cu, Au, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Pd, Pt, Ag, Ti, V, and W.,” Appl. Opt. 24, 4493–4499 (1985). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

In what follows we present a brief description of the MSM formalism, a comprehensive description of this numerical method being provided in Ref. [36

36. C. G. Biris and N. C. Panoiu, “Second harmonic generation in metamaterials based on homogenous centrosymmetric nanowires,” Phys. Rev. B 81, 195102 (2010). [CrossRef]

]. Thus, the magnetic field of an incoming plane wave can be expanded in a Fourier-Bessel series as,

Hzinc(r,φ)=Σm=amJm(k0r)eimφ,
(4)

where Jm denotes the Bessel functions of the first kind and am=Hωeim(π2+ϕ0) are the Fourier-Bessel coefficients, with Hω the field amplitude at the frequency ω. Similarly, the field scattered from the cylinder Cj can be expressed as:

Hz,jsc(r,φ)=Σm=bmjHm(2)(k0rPj)eimφPj,
(5)

where Hm (2) is the Hankel function of the second kind and bmj are the expansion coefficients of the scattered field; they represent the main unknowns of the linear scattering problem. Once these coefficients are calculated, the total field at a point P can be determined by using:

Hztot(P)=Σm=amJm(k0rP)eimφP+Σj=1NΣm=bmjHm(2)(k0rPj)eimφPj.
(6)

By introducing the column vectors aj={eik0rjcos(φjϕ0)am} and b j = {bmj} we can relate the two sets of expansion coefficients, for the incoming and scattered fields, via the scattering matrix, S j, of the cylinder Cj (for more details, see Ref. [38

38. E. Centeno and D. Felbacq, “Rigorous vector diffraction of electromagnetic waves by bidimensional photonic crystals,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 320–327 (2000). [CrossRef]

]):

Σk=1N[δkjI(1δkj)SjTjk]bk=Sjaj,j=1,2,...,N,
(7)

where I is the identity matrix and T jk is the coupling matrix between the cylinders Cj and Ck. The matrices S j can be easily found by solving the scattering problem for an isolated cylinder, with the appropriate boundary conditions. Then, by introducing the single column vectors B = {b j} and G = {S j a j}, we can reduce the Eq. (7) to a single matrix equation:

SωB=G,
(8)

where S ω is the scattering matrix of the whole system; from the Eq. (7) it is found to be:

Sω=(IS1T12S1T13S2T21IS2T23S3T31S3T32I).
(9)

Since G and T jk are known if the system characteristics, such as the material and geometrical parameters, are specified, the linear scattering problem has been reduced to the calculation of S ω and finding the solution of the Eq. (8). These calculations yield the coefficients bmj, which in turn can be used to determine the total field at the FF via the Eq. (6).

The second step in the nonlinear MSM algorithm consists of finding the field at the SH. In order to do this, one first has to determine the nonlinear polarization at the SH, which represents the source of the SH field. In the case of centrosymmetric media, such as noble metals considered in our study, the nonlinear polarization is the sum between a dipole-allowed surface contribution, P s(r;2ω), which is strongly localized within a thin interfacial layer at the surface of the metal, and a nonlocal, bulk nonlinear polarization, P b(r;2ω), generated inside the metal by electric quadrupoles and magnetic dipoles [46

46. T. F. Heinz, “Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Effects at Surfaces and Interfaces,” in Nonlinear Surface Electromagnetic Phenomena, edited by H. E. Ponath and G. I. Stegeman (Elsevier,Amsterdam, 1991); pp. 353–416.

]. The surface polarization is defined as

Ps(r;2ω)=ε0χ̂s(2)(r;2ω):E(r;ω)E(r;ω)δ(rrs),
(10)

where r s defines the surface of the metal, χˆs (2) is the surface second-order susceptibility tensor, and the Dirac function models the surface characteristic of this polarization. Due to the symmetries of a homogeneous and isotropic interface the surface nonlinear susceptibility tensor has only three independent components. In the case of Ag their values are χˆ (2) s,⊥⊥⊥ = 2.79×10−18 m2/V, χˆ (2) s,∥∥⊥ = χˆ (2) s,∥⊥∥ = 3.98×10−20 m2/V, and χˆ (2) s,⊥∥∥ = 0 [47

47. D. Krause, C. W. Teplin, and C. T. Rogers, “Optical surface second harmonic measurements of isotropic thin-film metals: Gold, silver, copper, aluminum, and tantalum,” J. App. Phys. 96, 3626–3635 (2004). [CrossRef]

].

For an isotropic centrosymmetric medium the bulk nonlinear polarization is given by [48

48. N. Bloembergen, R. K. Chang, S. S. Jha, and C. H. Lee, “Optical Second-Harmonic Generation in Reflection from Media with Inversion Symmetry,” Phys. Rev. 174, 813–822 (1968). [CrossRef]

],

Pb(2ω)=α[E(ω)·]E(ω)+βE(ω)[·E(ω)]+γ[E(ω)·E(ω)],
(11)

where α, β, and γ are material dependent physical constants. Assuming that the electrons in the metal are described by the free-electron gas model, these bulk nonlinear coefficients are

α=0;β=ε0e2m0ω2;γ=β4[1εr(ω)],
(12)

with e and m 0 being the electron charge and mass, respectively, and εr(ω) = ε(ω)/ε 0.

Using an approach similar to that used to determine the field at the FF, the total field at the SH, at a point P outside the cylinder Cj, can be written as [36

36. C. G. Biris and N. C. Panoiu, “Second harmonic generation in metamaterials based on homogenous centrosymmetric nanowires,” Phys. Rev. B 81, 195102 (2010). [CrossRef]

]:

Hz,jtot(P,Ω)=Σm=(aΩ,mj+bΩ,mj)Hm(2)(krPj)eimφPj
+Σk=1kjNΣm,q=Tjk,mq(aΩ,qk+bΩ,qk)Jm(krPj)eimφPj.
(13)

where k=μ0εbΩ is the wave vector at the SH. In the Eq. (13) the index j signifies that Htotz,j is calculated in the coordinate system with the origin in Oj, whereas the coefficients a Ω,mj and b Ω,mj are the Fourier-Bessel coefficients of the series expansion of the field generated by the nonlinear polarization and the scattered field, respectively. Note that the coefficients a Ω,j = {a Ω,mj} are fully determined by the nonlinear polarization and therefore the main unknowns of the nonlinear scattering problem are the coefficients b Ω,j = {b Ω,mj}. The two sets of expansion coefficients satisfy the following system of matrix equations:

Σk=1kjNSΩ,jTjk(aΩ,k+bΩ,k)=(aΩ,j+bΩ,j)gΩ,jself,j=1,2,...,N,
(14)

where g self Ω,j are the source coefficients of the nonlinear field generated by a single cylinder; their rather cumbersome expressions can be found in Ref. [36

36. C. G. Biris and N. C. Panoiu, “Second harmonic generation in metamaterials based on homogenous centrosymmetric nanowires,” Phys. Rev. B 81, 195102 (2010). [CrossRef]

]. By denoting the vectors A Ω ={a Ω,j},B Ω = {b Ω,j}, and G self Ω = {g self Ω,j} we can reduce the system (14) to a single matrix equation:

SΩBΩ=SΩAΩ+GΩself.
(15)

Finally, by solving this linear system one finds the coefficients b Ω,j and, subsequently, via the Eq. (13), the total field at the SH at any arbitrary position.

The final step of our algorithm consists in calculating the optical field in the time domain. To achieve this, one simply inverse Fourier transforms the field spectra obtained in the preceding step. Specifically, accurate description of the optical field dynamics has been achieved by dividing the total temporal domain, T = 70√2T 0, in NFT = 8192 equal time intervals. Typical execution time when employing 64 Intel® Xeon cores is about 1 hour, provided that the field variables are computed at a single spatial point. This procedure allows one to obtain a complete description of the dynamics of the optical near- and far-field, at both the FF and the SH. As a final remark on the numerical algorithm used here, we want to stress that it allows one to easily incorporate nonlinear surface effects, which would prove to be a challenging task for alternative methods based on the finite-difference time-domain discretization of the field variables.

3. Results and discussions

In this section we will illustrate how the numerical method just described can be applied to investigate the physical characteristics of linear and nonlinear localized SPP modes excited by sub-picosecond pulses upon their interaction with plasmonic nanocavities. In particular, we explore the relation between the geometry and material parameters of the plasmonic cavities and the main optical properties of the localized SPP modes. In the presentation of our main results we will focus on the optical properties of the localized modes excited at the SH as the main conclusions derived in this case also apply to the modes observed at the FF. In addition, since there is no incoming pulse at the SH, some physical quantities characterizing the localized SPP modes, such as their Q factor, can be much easier calculated if the optical field at the SH is analyzed. This approach can also be relevant for a series of potential technological applications, such as sensing or optical detection, as the optical signal generated at the SH is spectrally well separated from the incoming and scattered fields at the FF.

To begin with, we illustrate in Fig. 2 the generic characteristics of the linear and nonlinear interaction between an incoming optical pulse and a SPP cavity mode. One convenient approach for identifying these modes relies on the spectra of the absorption cross-section at the FF, σa(ω), and the corresponding absorption spectra at the SH, ∑a(2ω). To be more specific, it is expected that at the resonance frequency of the localized SPP modes the spectra of the optical absorption presents resonances, as at these specific frequencies the interaction of the optical near-field with the metallic nanowires is enhanced. At the FF the absorption spectra are calculated by using the scattering coefficients b j, in conjunction with the optical theorem, whereas at the SH we simply compute the total Joule dissipation power by integrating over the metal regions the density of the dissipated power, Pabs=12𝔢(J·E*) , with J = σj E being the conduction current density and σj the conductivity of the cylinder Cj (see Ref. [36

36. C. G. Biris and N. C. Panoiu, “Second harmonic generation in metamaterials based on homogenous centrosymmetric nanowires,” Phys. Rev. B 81, 195102 (2010). [CrossRef]

] for more details pertaining to these calculations). In the case of the Drude model, σ = ε 0 ω 2 p/(v).

The top panels in Fig. 2, which corresponds to a plasmonic cavity made of 6 metallic nanowires, show that the spectra of the absorption cross sections at the FF and SH contain a series of spectral peaks. In addition, the spectral location of these peaks changes with the separation distance between adjacent nanowires, d, a variation of d of less than 100 nm leading to a spectral shift of the resonances at the FF of almost 300 nm. Additional information pertaining to the optical properties of plasmonic cavity modes is revealed by the temporal dynamics of the optical near-field. Thus, the bottom panels in Fig. 2 (and the accompanying movies) reveal that the field at the SH remains trapped in the cavity long after the initial pulsed excitation at the FF has passed through the cavity. Since the nonlinear response of the metal is assumed to be instantaneous, it can be inferred that a nonlinear cavity mode with a significant lifetime and, implicitly, large Q factor, is formed in the cavity. In addition, the plasmonic character of this mode is evident from the spatial distribution of the near-field, namely, the field has large values at the metal surfaces and decays steeply towards the center of the plasmonic cavity. In what follows, we present a more detailed analysis of these plasmonic cavity modes, as well as modes of a different physical nature, namely, multipole plasmon modes.

Fig. 2. Top panels show logarithmic plots of the absorption cross sections, calculated for a plasmonic cavity containing 6 nanowires. The legend indicates the separation distance, in nanometers. Bottom panels show a snapshot of the temporal evolution of the intensity of the electric field. The left and right panels correspond to the FF (Media 1) and SH (Media 2), respectively. The plasmonic cavity consists of Ag cylinders with R = 200 nm and d = 60 nm. The wavelength at the FF is λFF = 858 nm and the angle of incidence is ϕ 0 = 90°.

3.1. Localized plasmon modes in coupled cylindrical nanowires

Fig. 3. Top panels show logarithmic plots of the absorption cross sections. The legends indicate the number of cylinders. Bottom panels present the amplitude of the electric field at the SH, for Ag cylinders with R = 200 nm and d = 20 nm, at λSH = 578 nm and ϕ 0 = 0 (for better visualization, we plot the fourth-order square root of the field amplitude).

To characterize the influence of the system geometry on the resonance frequencies of the multipole plasmon modes we have determined the absorption spectra for different values of the angle of incidence ϕ 0 and separation distance d. The dispersion plots corresponding to the absorption spectra at the SH are presented in the Fig. 5. These absorption spectra clearly indicate that the resonance frequencies of the multipole plasmon modes are almost independent on the system parameters, supporting therefore the conclusion that they correspond to optical modes excited in each of the metallic nanowires. More specifically, the resonance frequencies of these modes remain unchanged even if the distance between the adjacent metallic nanowires is decreased to a value as small as 1 nm. On the other hand, a significant increase of the optical absorption occurs when the separation distance becomes smaller than a few nanometers, an effect explained by the field enhancement observed in the region separating adjacent nanowires. Figure 5 also shows that the spectral width of the resonances varies with the angle of incidence ϕ 0. This dependence suggests that, as expected, the strength of the interaction between the input wave and the plasmonic structure and, consequently, the magnitude of the field generated at the SH, changes with the angle of incidence. In addition, it can be seen from Fig. 5 that as the separation distance between the nanowires increases the width of the spectral resonances decreases, and effect that is explained by the fact that the strength of the coupling between the modes excited in adjacent nanowires decreases with the separation distance.

Fig. 4. Distribution of the amplitude of the electric field (top panels) and the real part of the magnetic field (bottom panels) at the SH, calculated for three different plasmonic cavities made of Ag cylinders with R = 200 nm and separation distance d = 20 nm. The wavelength at the SH is λSH = 336 nm and ϕ 0 = 0 (for better visualization, in the case of the electric field, we plot the fourth-order square root of the field amplitude).
Fig. 5. Logarithmic plots of absorption cross section spectra at the SH vs. the angle of incidence ϕ 0 (top) and separation distance d (bottom), determined for a three-cylinder geometry. The top and bottom panels correspond to d = 60 nm and ϕ 0 = 0, respectively.

3.2. Plasmonic cavity modes

Fig. 6. Top panels show logarithmic plots of the absorption cross section at the FF and the SH. The legend indicates the number of cylinders forming the plasmonic cavity. Bottom panels present the distribution of the amplitude of the electric field at the SH, for Ag cylinders with R=200 nm and separation distance d=60 nm. From left to right, the wavelength at the SH is λSH = 321 nm, λSH = 429 nm, and λSH = 333 nm.

Fig. 7. The same as in Fig. 5 but for a hexagonal plasmonic cavity.

The strong dependence of the resonance frequency of plasmonic cavity modes on the distance between cylinders or other geometrical parameters can have important applications to sensing or photovoltaic devices. Specifically, the plasmonic cavity can be viewed as playing the role of an optical antenna that collects and concentrates the signal carried by the input pulse into a reduced volume, making it possible to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and/or speed of a detector. These plasmonic cavities can also be employed in the design of lasers with subwavelength size, as has in fact been recently demonstrated [30

30. M. P. Nezhand, A. Simic, O. Bondarenko, B. Slutsky, A. Mizrahi, L. Feng, V. Lomakin, and Y. Fainman, “Room-temperature subwavelength metallo-dielectric lasers,” Nature Phot. 4, 395–399 (2010). [CrossRef]

, 31

31. K. Yu, A. Lakhani, and M. C. Wu, “Subwavelength metal-optic semiconductor nanopatch lasers,” Opt. Express 18, 8790–8799 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In particular, the Q factor of plasmonic cavities employed in laser applications plays a crucial role in determining the performance of such nanolasers. Consequently, in what follows we study in more detail the dependence of the Q factor of the plasmonic cavity modes on the parameters defining the plasmonic structure.

3.3. Time domain analysis

The main physical quantity that describes the temporal response of an optical mode is the Q factor (or, equivalently, its lifetime). In order to calculate this important parameter that characterizes a plasmonic cavity mode we proceeded as follows. First, we illuminated the cavity with an optical pulse of sub-picosecond duration and subsequently we recorded the optical field, at both the FF and SH, at an arbitrary location inside the cavity. If the carrier frequency of the input optical pulse is close to a resonance frequency of a plasmonic cavity mode the asymptotic temporal evolution of the optical field can be represented by an exponential dependence,

E(t)=E0eωrtQ,
(16)

where ωr is the resonance frequency of the plasmonic cavity mode. It should be noted that the relation (16) is independent of the location of the point in the cavity where the field is measured, the value of the carrier frequency of the input optical pulse (as long as it is close to ωr), and the duration of the incident optical pulse, a conclusion that is fully verified by our numerical simulations. Therefore, the Q factor of the optical mode can be easily determined by calculating the slope of the line representing the linear fit of the semi-logarithmic temporal dependence of the computed field inside the cavity.

We have calculated the Q factor of the plasmonic cavity mode of the the hexagonal plasmonic cavity and the main results are summarized in Fig. 8. As expected, when the carrier frequency of the input optical pulse is close to the resonance frequency of the cavity mode the temporal evolution of the normalized field inside the cavity follows the exponential decay described by the Eq. (16). From this asymptotic dependence we have derived the value of the Q factor of the cavity mode and the corresponding lifetime, τ = Q/ωr.

Fig. 8. a) Normalized electric field inside the cavity vs. time. The numbers in the legend refer to the separation distance in nanometers. b) The dependence of the Q factor on the separation distance d: circles represent simulation results whereas the dotted line is provided as a guide to the eye. The cavity consists of Ag cylinders with R = 200 nm and the incoming pulse has T 0 = 283 fs.
1Q=1Qabs+1Qrad,
(17)

where Qabs is determined by the absorption in the metallic nanowires and Qrad is due to radiative losses. The Qabs factor can be calculated from the absorption spectra by fitting with a Lorentzian the region the spectrum corresponding to the resonance peak. Thus, Qabs = ωr/∆ω, where ∆ω is the spectral width of the Lorentzian. By using this procedure we found that for small values of the separation distance QabsQ, which means that the losses of the plasmonic cavity mode are primarily due to the absorption loss in the metal. This result also supports the conclusion that the plasmonic cavity mode is a dark-plasmon mode, whose radiative losses are suppressed. As d increases, the field confinement decreases, and therefore the absorption losses decrease. Consequently, the Q factor of the optical mode increases. If the separation distance is further increased, the optical field begins to leak more easily out of the cavity, the cavity effects become weaker, and consequently the radiative losses start to dominate. As a result, the Q factor of the mode begins to decrease. This scenario predicts that there is a separation distance for which the Q factor reaches a maximum value, a prediction which is fully verified by the results presented in Fig. 8b. This analysis also suggests that by minimizing the optical losses associated to plasmonic cavity modes it is possible to optimize considerably the efficiency of these plasmonic cavities, a property that can have important implications to the development of efficient subwavelength nanolasers.

4. Conclusions

In conclusion, we have presented and discussed the main optical properties of linear and nonlinear localized SPP modes excited upon the interaction between ultra-short optical pulses and nanocavities made of metallic nanowires. Our numerical analysis, based on the MSM formalism, has revealed that plasmonic cavities support two distinct types of localized SPP modes, namely, multipole plasmon modes that are the result of the hybridization of coupled plasmon modes supported by each metallic nanowire of the plasmonic cavity, and plasmonic cavity modes, which can be viewed as the coherent optical response of the entire assembly of metallic nanowires. We have also demonstrated that this dichotomy in the physical origin of these optical modes is responsible for their markedly different optical properties. For example, whereas the properties of the multipole plasmon modes depend almost exclusively on the size of the individual nanowires, the geometrical and material parameters of the plasmonic cavity strongly influence the characteristics of the plasmonic cavity modes. In particular, we have demonstrated that this feature can be used effectively to design plasmonic cavities with extremely large Q factors. As a consequence, we believe that the results presented in this work could lead to a better understanding of linear and nonlinear optical effects at the nanoscale and, equally important, will have significant technological applications to nano-sensors, ultra-small detectors, subwavelength lasers, and other active photonic nanodevices.

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the use of the UCL Legion High Performance Computing Facility, and associated support services, in the completion of this work. This work was supported by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (ESPRC), under Grant No. EP/G030502/1.

References and links

1.

S. Linden, C. Enkrich, M. Wegener, J. Zhou, T. Koschny, and C. M. Soukoulis, “Magnetic Response of Metamaterials at 100 Terahertz,” Science 306, 1351–1353 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

R. A. Shelby, D. R. Smith, and S. Schultz, “Experimental Verification of a Negative Index of Refraction,” Science 292, 77–79 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

S. Zhang, W. Fan, N. C. Panoiu, K. J. Malloy, R. M. Osgood, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Experimental Demonstration of Near-Infrared Negative-Index Metamaterials,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 137404 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4.

V. M. Shalaev, W. Cai, U. K. Chettiar, H-K. Yuan, A. K. Sarychev, V. P. Drachev, and A. V. Kildishev, “Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials,” Opt. Lett. 30, 3356–3358 (2005). [CrossRef]

5.

R. W. Ziolkowski, “Propagation in and scattering from a matched metamaterial having a zero index of refraction,” Phys. Rev. E 70, 046608 (2004). [CrossRef]

6.

N. C. Panoiu, R. M. Osgood, S. Zhang, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Zero-n bandgap in photonic crystal superlattices,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23, 506–513 (2006). [CrossRef]

7.

S. Kocaman, R. Chatterjee, N. C. Panoiu, J. F. McMillan, M. B. Yu, R. M. Osgood, D. L. Kwong, and C. W. Wong, “Observation of Zeroth-Order Band Gaps in Negative-Refraction Photonic Crystal Superlattices at Near-Infrared Frequencies,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 203905 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

U. Kreibig and M. Vollmer, Optical Properties of Metal Clusters (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1995).

9.

A. V. Zayats, I. I. Smolyaninov, and A. A. Maradudin, “Nano-optics of surface plasmon polaritons,” Phys. Rep. 408, 131–314 (2005). [CrossRef]

10.

W. Fan, S. Zhang, N. C. Panoiu, A. Abdenour, S. Krishna, R. M. Osgood, K. J. Malloy, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Second Harmonic Generation from a Nanopatterned Isotropic Nonlinear Material,” Nano Lett. 6, 1027–1030 (2006). [CrossRef]

11.

J. A. H. van Nieuwstadt, M. Sandtke, R. H. Harmsen, F. B. Segerink, J. C. Prangsma, S. Enoch, and L. Kuipers, “Strong Modification of the Nonlinear Optical Response of Metallic Subwavelength Hole Arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 146102 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

L. Cao, N. C. Panoiu, and R. M. Osgood, “Surface second-harmonic generation from surface plasmon waves scattered by metallic nanostructures,” Phys. Rev. B 75, 205401 (2007). [CrossRef]

13.

Y. Zeng, W. Hoyer, J. J. Liu, S. W. Koch, and J. V. Moloney, “Classical theory for second-harmonic generation from metallic nanoparticles,” Phys. Rev. B 79, 235109 (2009). [CrossRef]

14.

I. I. Smolyaninov, A. V. Zayats, A. Gungor, and C. C. Davis, “Single-Photon Tunneling via Localized Surface Plasmons,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 187402 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

X. W. Wang, G. C. Schatz, and S. K. Gray, “Ultrafast pulse excitation of a metallic nanosystem containing a Kerr nonlinear material,” Phys. Rev. B 74, 195439 (2006). [CrossRef]

16.

K. Kneipp, Y. Wang, H. Kneipp, L. T. Perelman, I. Itzkan, R. R. Dasari, and M. S. Feld, “Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS),” Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1667 (1997). [CrossRef]

17.

T. H. Taminiau, R. J. Moerland, F. B. Segerink, L. Kuipers, and N. F. van Hulst, “λ/4 Resonance of an Optical Monopole Antenna Probed by Single Molecule Fluorescence,” Nano Lett. 7, 28 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

B. Knoll and F. Keilmann, “Near-field probing of vibrational absorption for chemical microscopy,” Nature (London) 399, 134–137 (1999). [CrossRef]

19.

R. M. Roth, N. C. Panoiu, M. M. Adams, R. M. Osgood, C. C. Neacsu, and M. B. Raschke, “Resonant-plasmon field enhancement from asymmetrically illuminated conical metallic-probe tips,” Opt. Express 14, 2921–2913 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

S. I. Bozhevolnyi, J. Beermann, and V. Coello, “Direct Observation of Localized Second-Harmonic Enhancement in Random Metal Nanostructures,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 197403 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

T. Ishi, J. Fujikata, K. Makita, T. Baba, and K. Ohashi, “Si nano-photodiode with a surface plasmon antenna,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 44, L364–L366 (2005). [CrossRef]

22.

Z. Yu, G. Veronis, S. Fan, and M. L. Brongersma, “Design of midinfrared photodetectors enhanced by surface plasmons on grating structures,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 151116 (2006). [CrossRef]

23.

R. D. R. Bhat, N. C. Panoiu, S. R. J. Brueck, and R. M. Osgood, “Enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio of an infrared photodetector with a circular metal grating,” Opt. Express 16, 4588–4596 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

24.

D. M. Schaadt, B. Feng, and E. T. Yu, “Enhanced semiconductor optical absorption via surface plasmon excitation in metal nanoparticles,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 063106 (2005). [CrossRef]

25.

N. C. Panoiu and R. M. Osgood, “Enhanced optical absorption for photovoltaics via excitation of waveguide and plasmon-polariton modes,” Opt. Lett. 32, 2825–2827 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

N. C. Panoiu and R. M. Osgood, “Subwavelength Nonlinear Plasmonic Nanowire,” Nano Lett. 4, 2427–2430 (2004). [CrossRef]

27.

F. Ye, D. Mihalache, B. Hu, and N. C. Panoiu, “Subwavelength Plasmonic Lattice Solitons in Arrays of Metallic Nanowires,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 106802 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

28.

B. Min, E. Ostby, V. Sorger, E. Ulin-Avila, L. Yang, X. Zhang, and K. Vahala, “High-Q surface-plasmon-polariton whispering-gallery microcavity,” Nature (London) 457, 455–459 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

29.

M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, A. M. Belgrave, R. Bakker, V. M. Shalaev, E. E. Narimanov, S. Stout, E. Herz, T. Suteewong, and U. Wiesner, “Demonstration of a spaser-based nanolaser,” Nature (London) 460, 1110–1112 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

30.

M. P. Nezhand, A. Simic, O. Bondarenko, B. Slutsky, A. Mizrahi, L. Feng, V. Lomakin, and Y. Fainman, “Room-temperature subwavelength metallo-dielectric lasers,” Nature Phot. 4, 395–399 (2010). [CrossRef]

31.

K. Yu, A. Lakhani, and M. C. Wu, “Subwavelength metal-optic semiconductor nanopatch lasers,” Opt. Express 18, 8790–8799 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

32.

V. Berger, “Second-harmonic generation in monolithic cavities”, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 14, 1351–1360 (1997). [CrossRef]

33.

D. G. Gusev, I. V. Soboleva, M. G. Martemyanov, T. V. Dolgova, A. A. Fedyanin, and O. A. Aktsipetrov, “Enhanced second-harmonic generation in coupled microcavities based on all-silicon photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B 68, 233303 (2003). [CrossRef]

34.

G. Kozyreff, J. L. D. Juarez, and J. Martorell, “Whispering-gallery-mode phase matching for surface second-order nonlinear optical processes in spherical microresonators,” Phys. Rev. A 77, 043817 (2008). [CrossRef]

35.

Y. Xu, M. Han, A. B. Wang, Z. Liu, and J. R. Heflin, “Second order parametric processes in nonlinear silica microspheres,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 163905 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

36.

C. G. Biris and N. C. Panoiu, “Second harmonic generation in metamaterials based on homogenous centrosymmetric nanowires,” Phys. Rev. B 81, 195102 (2010). [CrossRef]

37.

J. A. Sanchez-Gil and A. A. Maradudin, “Dynamic near-field calculations of surface-plasmon polariton pulses resonantly scattered at sub-micron metal defects,” Opt. Express 12, 883–894 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

38.

E. Centeno and D. Felbacq, “Rigorous vector diffraction of electromagnetic waves by bidimensional photonic crystals,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 320–327 (2000). [CrossRef]

39.

J. I. Dadap, “Optical second-harmonic scattering from cylindrical particles,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 205322 (2008). [CrossRef]

40.

C. I. Valencia, E. R. Mendez, and B. S. Mendoza, “Second-harmonic generation in the scattering of light by an infinite cylinder,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21, 36–44 (2004). [CrossRef]

41.

C. I. Valencia, E. R. Mendez, and B. S. Mendoza, “Second-harmonic generation in the scattering of light by two-dimensional particles,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20, 2150–2161 (2003). [CrossRef]

42.

E. Centeno and D. Felbacq, “Second-harmonic emission in two-dimensional photonic crystals,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23, 2257–2264 (2006). [CrossRef]

43.

J. Rudnick and E. A. Stern, “Second-harmonic Radiation from Metal Surfaces,” Phys. Rev. B 4, 4274 (1971). [CrossRef]

44.

J. I. Dadap, J. Shan, K. B. Eisenthal, and T. F. Heinz, “Second-Harmonic Rayleigh Scattering from a Sphere of Centrosymmetric Material,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4045 (1999). [CrossRef]

45.

M. A. Ordal, R. J. Bell, R. W. Alexander, Jr, L. L. Long, and M. R. Querry “Optical properties of fourteen metals in the infrared and far infrared: Al, Co, Cu, Au, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Pd, Pt, Ag, Ti, V, and W.,” Appl. Opt. 24, 4493–4499 (1985). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

46.

T. F. Heinz, “Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Effects at Surfaces and Interfaces,” in Nonlinear Surface Electromagnetic Phenomena, edited by H. E. Ponath and G. I. Stegeman (Elsevier,Amsterdam, 1991); pp. 353–416.

47.

D. Krause, C. W. Teplin, and C. T. Rogers, “Optical surface second harmonic measurements of isotropic thin-film metals: Gold, silver, copper, aluminum, and tantalum,” J. App. Phys. 96, 3626–3635 (2004). [CrossRef]

48.

N. Bloembergen, R. K. Chang, S. S. Jha, and C. H. Lee, “Optical Second-Harmonic Generation in Reflection from Media with Inversion Symmetry,” Phys. Rev. 174, 813–822 (1968). [CrossRef]

49.

M. Liu, T. W. Lee, S. K. Gray, P. Guyot-Sionnest, and M. Pelton, “Excitation of Dark Plasmons in Metal Nanoparticles by a Localized Emitter,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 107401 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(190.4350) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics at surfaces
(240.6680) Optics at surfaces : Surface plasmons
(140.3945) Lasers and laser optics : Microcavities

ToC Category:
Optics at Surfaces

History
Original Manuscript: June 21, 2010
Revised Manuscript: July 16, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: July 21, 2010
Published: July 28, 2010

Citation
Claudiu G. Biris and Nicolae C. Panoiu, "Nonlinear pulsed excitation of high-Q optical modes of plasmonic nanocavities," Opt. Express 18, 17165-17179 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-16-17165


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. S. Linden, C. Enkrich, M. Wegener, J. Zhou, T. Koschny, and C. M. Soukoulis, “Magnetic Response of Metamaterials at 100 Terahertz,” Science 306, 1351–1353 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. R. A. Shelby, D. R. Smith, and S. Schultz, “Experimental Verification of a Negative Index of Refraction,” Science 292, 77–79 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. S. Zhang, W. Fan, N. C. Panoiu, K. J. Malloy, R. M. Osgood, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Experimental Demonstration of Near-Infrared Negative-Index Metamaterials,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 137404 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  4. V. M. Shalaev, W. Cai, U. K. Chettiar, H.-K. Yuan, A. K. Sarychev, V. P. Drachev, and A. V. Kildishev, “Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials,” Opt. Lett. 30, 3356–3358 (2005). [CrossRef]
  5. R. W. Ziolkowski, “Propagation in and scattering from a matched metamaterial having a zero index of refraction,” Phys. Rev. E 70, 046608 (2004). [CrossRef]
  6. N. C. Panoiu, R. M. Osgood, S. Zhang, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Zero-n bandgap in photonic crystal superlattices,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23, 506–513 (2006). [CrossRef]
  7. S. Kocaman, R. Chatterjee, N. C. Panoiu, J. F. McMillan, M. B. Yu, R. M. Osgood, D. L. Kwong, and C. W. Wong, “Observation of Zeroth-Order Band Gaps in Negative-Refraction Photonic Crystal Superlattices at Near-Infrared Frequencies,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 203905 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. U. Kreibig, and M. Vollmer, Optical Properties of Metal Clusters (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1995).
  9. A. V. Zayats, I. I. Smolyaninov, and A. A. Maradudin, “Nano-optics of surface plasmon polaritons,” Phys. Rep. 408, 131–314 (2005). [CrossRef]
  10. W. Fan, S. Zhang, N. C. Panoiu, A. Abdenour, S. Krishna, R. M. Osgood, K. J. Malloy, and S. R. J. Brueck, “Second Harmonic Generation from a Nano-patterned Isotropic Nonlinear Material,” Nano Lett. 6, 1027–1030 (2006). [CrossRef]
  11. J. A. H. van Nieuwstadt, M. Sandtke, R. H. Harmsen, F. B. Segerink, J. C. Prangsma, S. Enoch, and L. Kuipers, “Strong Modification of the Nonlinear Optical Response of Metallic Subwavelength Hole Arrays,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 146102 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. L. Cao, N. C. Panoiu, and R. M. Osgood, “Surface second-harmonic generation from surface plasmon waves scattered by metallic nanostructures,” Phys. Rev. B 75, 205401 (2007). [CrossRef]
  13. Y. Zeng, W. Hoyer, J. J. Liu, S. W. Koch, and J. V. Moloney, “Classical theory for second-harmonic generation from metallic nanoparticles,” Phys. Rev. B 79, 235109 (2009). [CrossRef]
  14. I. I. Smolyaninov, A. V. Zayats, A. Gungor, and C. C. Davis, “Single-Photon Tunneling via Localized Surface Plasmons,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 187402 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. X. W. Wang, G. C. Schatz, and S. K. Gray, “Ultrafast pulse excitation of a metallic nanosystem containing a Kerr nonlinear material,” Phys. Rev. B 74, 195439 (2006). [CrossRef]
  16. K. Kneipp, Y. Wang, H. Kneipp, L. T. Perelman, I. Itzkan, R. R. Dasari, and M. S. Feld, “Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS),” Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 1667 (1997). [CrossRef]
  17. T. H. Taminiau, R. J. Moerland, F. B. Segerink, L. Kuipers, and N. F. van Hulst, “λ /4 Resonance of an Optical Monopole Antenna Probed by Single Molecule Fluorescence,” Nano Lett. 7, 28 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. B. Knoll, and F. Keilmann, “Near-field probing of vibrational absorption for chemical microscopy,” Nature 399, 134–137 (1999). [CrossRef]
  19. R. M. Roth, N. C. Panoiu, M. M. Adams, R. M. Osgood, C. C. Neacsu, and M. B. Raschke, “Resonant-plasmon field enhancement from asymmetrically illuminated conical metallic-probe tips,” Opt. Express 14, 2921–2913 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. S. I. Bozhevolnyi, J. Beermann, and V. Coello, “Direct Observation of Localized Second-Harmonic Enhancement in Random Metal Nanostructures,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 197403 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. T. Ishi, J. Fujikata, K. Makita, T. Baba, and K. Ohashi, “Si nano-photodiode with a surface plasmon antenna,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 44, L364–L366 (2005). [CrossRef]
  22. Z. Yu, G. Veronis, S. Fan, and M. L. Brongersma, “Design of midinfrared photodetectors enhanced by surface plasmons on grating structures,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 151116 (2006). [CrossRef]
  23. R. D. R. Bhat, N. C. Panoiu, S. R. J. Brueck, and R. M. Osgood, “Enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio of an infrared photodetector with a circular metal grating,” Opt. Express 16, 4588–4596 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  24. D. M. Schaadt, B. Feng, and E. T. Yu, “Enhanced semiconductor optical absorption via surface plasmon excitation in metal nanoparticles,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 063106 (2005). [CrossRef]
  25. N. C. Panoiu, and R. M. Osgood, “Enhanced optical absorption for photovoltaics via excitation of waveguide and plasmon-polariton modes,” Opt. Lett. 32, 2825–2827 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  26. N. C. Panoiu, and R. M. Osgood, “Subwavelength Nonlinear Plasmonic Nanowire,” Nano Lett. 4, 2427–2430 (2004). [CrossRef]
  27. F. Ye, D. Mihalache, B. Hu, and N. C. Panoiu, “Subwavelength Plasmonic Lattice Solitons in Arrays of Metallic Nanowires,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 106802 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  28. B. Min, E. Ostby, V. Sorger, E. Ulin-Avila, L. Yang, X. Zhang, and K. Vahala, “High-Q surface-plasmon-polariton whispering-gallery microcavity,” Nature 457, 455–459 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  29. M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, A. M. Belgrave, R. Bakker, V. M. Shalaev, E. E. Narimanov, S. Stout, E. Herz, T. Suteewong, and U. Wiesner, “Demonstration of a spaser-based nanolaser,” Nature 460, 1110–1112 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  30. M. P. Nezhand, A. Simic, O. Bondarenko, B. Slutsky, A. Mizrahi, L. Feng, V. Lomakin, and Y. Fainman, “Room temperature subwavelength metallo-dielectric lasers,” Nat. Photonics 4, 395–399 (2010). [CrossRef]
  31. K. Yu, A. Lakhani, and M. C. Wu, “Subwavelength metal-optic semiconductor nanopatch lasers,” Opt. Express 18, 8790–8799 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  32. V. Berger, “Second-harmonic generation in monolithic cavities,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 14, 1351–1360 (1997). [CrossRef]
  33. D. G. Gusev, I. V. Soboleva, M. G. Martemyanov, T. V. Dolgova, A. A. Fedyanin, and O. A. Aktsipetrov, “Enhanced second-harmonic generation in coupled microcavities based on all-silicon photonic crystals,” Phys. Rev. B 68, 233303 (2003). [CrossRef]
  34. G. Kozyreff, J. L. D. Juarez, and J. Martorell, “Whispering-gallery-mode phase matching for surface second-order nonlinear optical processes in spherical microresonators,” Phys. Rev. A 77, 043817 (2008). [CrossRef]
  35. Y. Xu, M. Han, A. B. Wang, Z. Liu, and J. R. Heflin, “Second order parametric processes in nonlinear silica microspheres,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 163905 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  36. C. G. Biris, and N. C. Panoiu, “Second harmonic generation in metamaterials based on homogenous centrosymmetric nanowires,” Phys. Rev. B 81, 195102 (2010). [CrossRef]
  37. J. A. Sanchez-Gil, and A. A. Maradudin, “Dynamic near-field calculations of surface-plasmon polariton pulses resonantly scattered at sub-micron metal defects,” Opt. Express 12, 883–894 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  38. E. Centeno, and D. Felbacq, “Rigorous vector diffraction of electromagnetic waves by bidimensional photonic crystals,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 17, 320–327 (2000). [CrossRef]
  39. J. I. Dadap, “Optical second-harmonic scattering from cylindrical particles,” Phys. Rev. B 78, 205322 (2008). [CrossRef]
  40. C. I. Valencia, E. R. Mendez, and B. S. Mendoza, “Second-harmonic generation in the scattering of light by an infinite cylinder,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 21, 36–44 (2004). [CrossRef]
  41. C. I. Valencia, E. R. Mendez, and B. S. Mendoza, “Second-harmonic generation in the scattering of light by two-dimensional particles,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20, 2150–2161 (2003). [CrossRef]
  42. E. Centeno, and D. Felbacq, “Second-harmonic emission in two-dimensional photonic crystals,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 23, 2257–2264 (2006). [CrossRef]
  43. J. Rudnick, and E. A. Stern, “Second-harmonic Radiation from Metal Surfaces,” Phys. Rev. B 4, 4274 (1971). [CrossRef]
  44. J. I. Dadap, J. Shan, K. B. Eisenthal, and T. F. Heinz, “Second-Harmonic Rayleigh Scattering from a Sphere of Centrosymmetric Material,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4045 (1999). [CrossRef]
  45. M. A. Ordal, R. J. Bell, R. W. Alexander, Jr., L. L. Long, and M. R. Querry, “Optical properties of fourteen metals in the infrared and far infrared: Al, Co, Cu, Au, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, Pd, Pt, Ag, Ti, V, and W,” Appl. Opt. 24, 4493–4499 (1985). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  46. T. F. Heinz, “Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Effects at Surfaces and Interfaces,” in Nonlinear Surface Electromagnetic Phenomena, edited by H. E. Ponath and G. I. Stegeman (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1991); pp. 353–416.
  47. D. Krause, C. W. Teplin, and C. T. Rogers, “Optical surface second harmonic measurements of isotropic thin-film metals: Gold, silver, copper, aluminum, and tantalum,” J. Appl. Phys. 96, 3626–3635 (2004). [CrossRef]
  48. N. Bloembergen, R. K. Chang, S. S. Jha, and C. H. Lee, “Optical Second-Harmonic Generation in Reflection from Media with Inversion Symmetry,” Phys. Rev. 174, 813–822 (1968). [CrossRef]
  49. M. Liu, T. W. Lee, S. K. Gray, P. Guyot-Sionnest, and M. Pelton, “Excitation of Dark Plasmons in Metal Nanoparticles by a Localized Emitter,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 107401 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.

Multimedia

Multimedia FilesRecommended Software
» Media 1: AVI (2045 KB)      QuickTime
» Media 2: AVI (2009 KB)      QuickTime

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited