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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 18 — Aug. 30, 2010
  • pp: 18642–18648
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Effect of Yb3+ concentration on the broadband emission intensity and peak wavelength shift in Yb/Bi ions co-doped silica-based glasses

Nengli Dai, Bing Xu, Zuowen Jiang, Jingang Peng, Haiqing Li, Huaixun Luan, Luyun Yang, and Jinyan Li  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 18, pp. 18642-18648 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.018642


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Abstract

The effect of Yb3+ concentration on the broadband emission intensity and peak wavelength shift in Yb/Bi ions co-doped silicate glasses is investigated. The optimal Bi2O3 concentration range is about 2.0-2.5mol% in 65SiO2-10Al2O3-25CaO matrix (SAC glasses). For Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses, the maximum emission intensity excited by 980nm LD is ~30 times and 1.5 times higher than that of single Bi-doped SAC glasses excited by 980nm and 808nm LD, respectively, the peak emission shows obvious red-shift from 1185 nm to 1235 nm band with the Yb2O3 concentration change from 0 to 3.0 mol%. For the same Yb2O3 concentration in SAC glasses, the measured fluorescence lifetime near 1020nm of single Yb3+-doped glasses is longer than that of Yb/Bi codoping glasses, which implyes the efficient energy transfer from Yb3+ to Bin+ in SAC glasses. The results indicate Yb2O3 can be induced into the bismuth-doped silicate glasses to enhance the emission intensity and control the peak wavelength.

© 2010 OSA

1. Introduction

Bismuth-doped glasses and fiber have attracted growing attention in recent years because of their promising applications including broadband fiber amplifier, tunable fiber laser, and supercontinuum operation [1

1. V. V. Dvoyrin, V. M. Mashinsky, L. I. Bulatov, I. A. Bufetov, A. V. Shubin, M. A. Melkumov, E. F. Kustov, E. M. Dianov, A. A. Umnikov, V. F. Khopin, M. V. Yashkov, and A. N. Guryanov, “Bismuth-doped-glass optical fibers--a new active medium for lasers and amplifiers,” Opt. Lett. 31(20), 2966–2968 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

4

4. J. Gopinath, H. Shen, H. Sotobayashi, E. Ippen, T. Hasegawa, T. Nagashima, and N. Sugimoto, “Highly nonlinear bismuth-oxide fiber for smooth supercontinuum generation at 1.5 microm,” Opt. Express 12(23), 5697–5702 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Broadband emission in the range of 1100-1500nm have been observed in Bi-doped aluminosilicate, borate, phosphate, germanate glasses and chalcogenide glasses [5

5. Y. Fujimoto and M. Nakatsuka, “Infrared luminescence from bismuth-doped silica glass,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 40(Part 2, No. 3B), L279–L281 (2001). [CrossRef]

10

10. G. Yang, D. P. Chen, J. Ren, Y. S. Xu, H. D. Zeng, Y. X. Yang, and G. R. Chenw, “Effects of melting temperature on the broadband infrared luminescence of bi-doped and Bi/Dy co-doped chalcohalide glasses,” J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 90(11), 3670–3672 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. Numerous investigations are focused on Bi-doped silica-based glasses and fiber due to its excellent physical, chemical, thermal properties and compatibility with conventional silica fiber [1

1. V. V. Dvoyrin, V. M. Mashinsky, L. I. Bulatov, I. A. Bufetov, A. V. Shubin, M. A. Melkumov, E. F. Kustov, E. M. Dianov, A. A. Umnikov, V. F. Khopin, M. V. Yashkov, and A. N. Guryanov, “Bismuth-doped-glass optical fibers--a new active medium for lasers and amplifiers,” Opt. Lett. 31(20), 2966–2968 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,11

11. Y. Q. Qiu and Y. H. Shen, “Investigation on the spectral characteristics of bismuth doped silica fibers,” Opt. Mater. 31(2), 223–228 (2008). [CrossRef]

15

15. S. Yoo, M. P. Kalita, J. Nilsson, and J. Sahu, “Excited state absorption measurement in the 900-1250 nm wavelength range for bismuth-doped silicate fibers,” Opt. Lett. 34(4), 530–532 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], furthermore the Bi-doped silica fiber is perfect material for high energy laser output because of it’s higher laser breakdown threshold than other glasses matrix. In recent years, various Bi-doped silica fiber have been fabricated, and the ~30% laser efficiency has been achieved near 1200nm with the Bi-doped silica fibers [3

3. E. M. Dianov, A. V. Shubin, M. A. Melkumov, O. I. Medvedkov, and I. A. Bufetov, “High-power cw bismuth-fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 24(8), 1749–1755 (2007). [CrossRef]

,16

16. I. A. Bufetov and E. M. Dianov, “Bi-doped fiber lasers,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(7), 487–504 (2009). [CrossRef]

19

19. S. F. Zhou, H. F. Dong, H. P. Zeng, J. H. Hao, J. X. Chen, and J. R. Qiu, “Infrared luminescence and amplification properties of Bi-doped GeO2-Ga2O3-Al2O3 glasses,” J. Appl. Phys. 103(10), 103532–4 (2008). [CrossRef]

].

Recently few reports have observed that the enhancement of the infrared emission intensity in rare earth and bismuth codoped silicate, phosphate and germanate glasses [20

20. Q. Qian, Q. Y. Zhang, G. F. Yang, Z. M. Yang, and Z. H. Jiang, “Enhanced broadband near-infrared emission from Bi-doped glasses by codoping with metal oxides,” J. Appl. Phys. 104(4), 043518–3 (2008). [CrossRef]

22

22. J. Ruan, E. Wu, B. T. Wu, H. P. Zeng, Q. Zhang, G. P. Dong, Y. B. Qiao, D. P. Chen, and J. R. Qiu, “Spectral properties and broadband optical amplification of Yb-Bi codoped MgO-Al2O3-ZnO-SiO2 glasses,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 26(4), 778–782 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. It is very important to find available codoping ions concentration to increase the emission intensity, and control the peak emission wavelength in bismuth-doped silicate glasse.

In this work, the Bi2O3, Yb2O3, Bi2O3/Yb2O3-doped silica-based glass samples were prepared, respectively. The optimal bismuth concentration has been obtained in SiO2-Al2O3-CaO glass firstly. Under the optimal bismuth concentration, we investigated the effect of different Yb3+ content on the emission intensity, peak wavelength and fluorescence lifetime in bismuth-doped glasses. It was found that the introduction of Yb2O3 can enhance the near infrared emission intensity, control the peak emission wavelength, and realize the energy transfer process from Yb ions to Bi ions.

2. Experiment

Reagent grade commercial oxides (>99.5% pure) were used as the starting materials. The dependence of Bi2O3 concentration on the emission spectra were investigated in SAC glasses with the composition of 65SiO2-10Al2O3-25CaO-xBi2O3 (x = 0.5, 1.0, 2, 3, 5mol%) to obtain the optimal Bi2O3 concentration. Based on the optimal Bi2O3 concentration, the different Yb2O3 content were introduced to the same glass matrix to explore the effect of Yb2O3 on the emission properties. The mixed batch of 30g were melted in alumina crucible at 1550°C for about 120 min. in air. The glass melt was poured on the pre-heated steel mold and then annealed for 2hrs near the glass transition temperature.

The glasses were cut into 15 × 15 × 2mm size and polished for optical measurement. The absorption spectroscopic were measured by PerkinElmer Lambda 35 spectrophotometer in the range of 200-1000nm. The emission spectra were measured by ZOLIX SBP300 in the range of 1000-1600nm and detected by InGaAs photo-detector excited by 808nm and 980nm LD, respectively. The fluorescence lifetime were measured by TRIAX550 spectrofluorometer and detected by InGaAs photo-detector and recoded by a storage digital oscilloscope (Tektronix TDS3052). All the measurements were carried out at room temperature in air.

3. Results and discussion

The glass samples with the red brownish color exhibit ~90% transmittance around 1100nm. Figure 1
Fig. 1 (a) The transmission spectra of xBi2O3 doped SAC glass. (b) The dependence of Bi2O3 concentration on the absorption coefficient and transmission at 808nm and 980nm band.
(a) shows the transmission of the xBi2O3 doped-SAC glasses (x = 0.5, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.5 mol%). The absorption band center at ~470nm, 700nm are observed in the range of 300 to 1100nm wavelength band. However, there is no apparent peak absorption from 700nm to 1100nm, which is similar with the silicate matrix of the work in reference [12

12. T. Suzuki and Y. Ohishi, “Ultrabroadband near-infrared emission from Bi-doped Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glass,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88(19), 191912–3 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. At the band of 470nm, the trasmission is decreased from ~78% to 20% with the Bi2O3 content change from 0.5 to 3.5mol%. For bismuth-doped glasses and fibers, the absorption at the band of 808nm and 980nm is especially important which can be pumped by low cost commercial laser diode (LD). Figure 1(b) shows the dependence of Bi2O3 concentration on the absorption coefficient at 808nm and 980nm band. For the same Bi2O3 concentration doped SAC glasses, the absorption coefficient at 808nm is almost 1.2-1.6 times higher than that of one at 980nm while we take the error of reflection of sample surface into account.

As shown in Fig. 2, we observe the peak emission wavelength (PEW) is blueshifted to 1150-1175nm under 980nm excitation from the peak at 1300nm under 808nm excitation. As we know, the O-band(~1250-1340nm) is corresponding to the low loss window of conventional silica fiber(shown in Fig. 2), so it is hoped that the PEW of bismuth doped glasses or fiber is in the range of O-band [24

24. T. Haruna, J. Iihara, and M. Onishi, “Bismuth-doped silicate glass fiber for ultra-broadband amplification media,” Proc. SPIE 6389, 638903 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. Moreover, due to the tail of near infrared absorption of Bi ions [25

25. M. P. Kalita, S. Yoo, and J. Sahu, “Bismuth doped fiber laser and study of unsaturable loss and pump induced absorption in laser performance,” Opt. Express 16(25), 21032–21038 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], the signal loss in the band of ~1150nm is higher than that one of band ~1300nm. Therefore, controling the PEW excited by 980nm LD in bismuth-doped bulk glasses is very important.

Based on the optimal Bi2O3 concentration, the effect of Yb2O3 content on the transmission of 65SiO2-10Al2O3-25CaO-2.0Bi2O3-yYb2O3 glasses(y = 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0mol%) is shown in Fig. 3
Fig. 3 (a) The transmission spectra of 2Bi2O3.yYb2O3 doped SAC glass. (b) the dependence of Yb2O3 concentration on the absorption coefficient and transmission at 808nm and 980nm band.
(a). The enhancement of absorption of Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses in the range of 900-1000nm ascribe to the 2F7/22F5/2 transition of Yb ions. As shown in Fig. 3(b), for the Yb2O3 content change from 0.5mol% to 3.0mol%, the absorption at 808nm is nearly stable, while the absorption coefficient near 980nm band of Yb/Bi doped SAC glasses increases from 3.8cm−1 to 10cm−1.

Figure 4(a)
Fig. 4 (a) The emission spectra 2Bi2O3.yYb2O3 doped SAC glass under 980nm LD excitation. (b) The emission properties of various Yb/Bi codoped and single Bi doped SAC glasses excited by 980nm and 808nm LD, respectively.
shows the emission spectra of different Yb2O3 content under 980nm LD excitation. There are two emission peaks including ~1030nm band and ~1240nm band under 980 excitation. The 2F5/22F7/2 transfer of Yb3+ contribute to the emission center at 1030nm band. The emission intensity at 1240nm is 25-30 times stronger than that of non-codoping of Yb2O3, as shown in Fig. 4(b). While Yb2O3 = 2.5mol%, the highest emission intensity has been obtained. From Fig. 4(a), the emission intensity near 1030nm of Yb3+ decreases with increasing the Yb2O3 concentration. The possible reasons are as follows, the formation of Yb ions cluster in higher Yb2O3 doped glasses lead to the decease of emission intensity near 1030nm and the energy of the excited state 2F5/2 of Yb ions transfer to the Bi ions.

As shown in Fig. 4.(b), the emission intensity of 2Bi2O3-2.5Yb2O3 codoped SAC glass is ~30 times higher than that of single 2Bi2O3 doped SAC glass under 980nm LD excitation. Futhermore, we compare the emission intensity of the same sample under 808nm and 980nm excitation respectively, also see the Fig. 4(b), the emission intensity under 980nm excitation is about 1.5 times higher than that of under 808nm excitation. The emission at 1030nm of Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses is observed while excited under 808nm, as we know, there is no absorption band for Yb3+ at 808nm. In order to investigate these interesting phenomenas, the fluorescence lifetime near 1020nm of Yb2O3 doped SAC glasses with and without Bi2O3 have been measured to explore the possible energy transfer between Yb3+ and Bi ions.

The measured fluorescence decay curve near 1020nm corresponding to the 2F5/2 energy level of Yb3+ in various samples are shown in Fig. 5
Fig. 5 (a) The fluorescence decay curve near 1020nm of single Yb3+ doped and Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses excited by 980nm LD. (b). The possible energy transfer process of Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses excited by 980nm and 808nm LD, respectively.
(a). The measured lifetime of 1.0mol% and 2.5mol% Yb2O3-doped glasses without and with bismuth are 1160μs, 505μs, 702μs, and 259μs, respectively. The decrease of measured lifetime of Yb/Bi codoped glasses implys the possible energy transfer from Yb3+ to Bin+ ions. Due to the close distance between Yb ions and Bi ions and low absorption in blulk glasses, it is impossible for the occurrence of radiative energy transfer from Yb3+ to Bin+ ions. The energy transfer efficiency can be evaluated by the following formula [22

22. J. Ruan, E. Wu, B. T. Wu, H. P. Zeng, Q. Zhang, G. P. Dong, Y. B. Qiao, D. P. Chen, and J. R. Qiu, “Spectral properties and broadband optical amplification of Yb-Bi codoped MgO-Al2O3-ZnO-SiO2 glasses,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 26(4), 778–782 (2009). [CrossRef]

]:
ηET=1τm(x)/τm(x0)
(1)
Where η ET, τm(x), and τm(x0) are the energy transfer efficiency, the measured lifetime of Yb/Bi codoped glass and single Yb doped glass, respectively. The highest η ET of ~48% can be obtained for 2.5Yb2O3/2Bi2O3 codoped SAC glasses in our experiment.

Figure 5(b) shows the possible energy transfer process of Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses excited by 980nm and 808nm LD, respectively. Under 980nm LD excitation, Yb ions are excited to 2F5/2 energy level and transfer the energy to the exicited stage of active Bi ions, then return to the ground state. Based on this process, the enhancement of emission intensity (see Fig. 4) and the decrease of 2F5/2 lifetime(Yb3+) in Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses are observed. Also see Fig. 5(b), the active Bi ions under 808nm excitation can transfer the excited state energy to the 2F5/2 energy level of Yb3+, then the emission near 1030nm can be observed in Yb/Bi codoped SAC glasses excited by 808nm LD.

Figure 6
Fig. 6 The dependence of different Yb2O3 on the peak emission wavelength in Yb/Bi codoped glasses under 980nm and 808nm LD excitation, respectively.
shows the dependence of different Yb2O3 on the peak emission wavelength(PEW) in Yb/Bi codoped glasses under 980nm and 808nm LD excitation, respectively. Under 808nm LD excitation, the PEW is in the range of 1310-1320nm. Under 980nm excitation, the PEW shows an obvious red-shifts from 1185nm to 1235nm band with the Yb2O3 concentration changing from 0 to 3.0mol%, the reasons for this phenomena are not uncertain and need exploration in details. The result indicates that we can control the PEW by introduding the Yb2O3 into the bismuth doped SAC glasses.

4. Conclusions

In summary, the Bi2O3, Yb2O3, Bi2O3/Yb2O3-doped SAC glasses samples were prepared, respectively. The effect of Yb3+ concentration on the broadband emission intensity, peak wavelength shift and the measured fluorescence lifetime in Yb/Bi codoped silicate glasses has been investigated. It was found that the introduction of Yb2O3 can enhance the near infrared emission intensity, control the peak emission wavelength, and realize the energy transfer process from Yb ions to Bi ions. It is suggested that the efficient energy transfer of Yb3+→Bin+ contributes to the enhancement of emission intensity.

Acknowledgement

The author would like to thank Dr. Qi Qian for supplying fluorescent lifetime measurement and helpful discussion, also thank Huazhong University of Science &Technology Analytical and Testing Center for her spectroscopic measurement.

References and links

1.

V. V. Dvoyrin, V. M. Mashinsky, L. I. Bulatov, I. A. Bufetov, A. V. Shubin, M. A. Melkumov, E. F. Kustov, E. M. Dianov, A. A. Umnikov, V. F. Khopin, M. V. Yashkov, and A. N. Guryanov, “Bismuth-doped-glass optical fibers--a new active medium for lasers and amplifiers,” Opt. Lett. 31(20), 2966–2968 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

2.

S. V. Firstov, I. A. Bufetov, V. F. Khopin, A. V. Shubin, A. M. Smirnov, L. D. Iskhakova, N. N. Vechkanov, A. N. Guryanov, and E. M. Dianov, “2 W bismuth doped fiber lasers in the wavelength range 1300-1500 nm and variation of Bi-doped fiber parameters with core composition,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(9), 665–670 (2009). [CrossRef]

3.

E. M. Dianov, A. V. Shubin, M. A. Melkumov, O. I. Medvedkov, and I. A. Bufetov, “High-power cw bismuth-fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 24(8), 1749–1755 (2007). [CrossRef]

4.

J. Gopinath, H. Shen, H. Sotobayashi, E. Ippen, T. Hasegawa, T. Nagashima, and N. Sugimoto, “Highly nonlinear bismuth-oxide fiber for smooth supercontinuum generation at 1.5 microm,” Opt. Express 12(23), 5697–5702 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

Y. Fujimoto and M. Nakatsuka, “Infrared luminescence from bismuth-doped silica glass,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 40(Part 2, No. 3B), L279–L281 (2001). [CrossRef]

6.

M. Y. Peng, J. R. Qiu, D. P. Chen, X. G. Meng, and C. S. Zhu, “Broadband infrared luminescence from Li2O-Al2O3-ZnO-SiO2 glasses doped with Bi2O3,” Opt. Express 13(18), 6892–6898 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

M. Y. Peng, J. R. Qiu, D. P. Chen, X. G. Meng, I. Y. Yang, X. W. Jiang, and C. S. Zhu, “Bismuth- and aluminum-codoped germanium oxide glasses for super-broadband optical amplification,” Opt. Lett. 29(17), 1998–2000 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

X. G. Meng, J. R. Qiu, M. Y. Peng, D. P. Chen, Q. Z. Zhao, X. W. Jiang, and C. S. Zhu, “Near infrared broadband emission of bismuth-doped aluminophosphate glass,” Opt. Express 13(5), 1628–1634 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

X. M. Xian-Gengng, P. Ming-Ying, C. Dan-Ping, Y. Lv-Yun, J. Xiong-Wei, Z. Cong-Shan, and Q. Jian-Rong, “Broadband infrared luminescence of bismuth-doped borosilicate glasses,” Chin. Phys. Lett. 22(3), 615–617 (2005). [CrossRef]

10.

G. Yang, D. P. Chen, J. Ren, Y. S. Xu, H. D. Zeng, Y. X. Yang, and G. R. Chenw, “Effects of melting temperature on the broadband infrared luminescence of bi-doped and Bi/Dy co-doped chalcohalide glasses,” J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 90(11), 3670–3672 (2007). [CrossRef]

11.

Y. Q. Qiu and Y. H. Shen, “Investigation on the spectral characteristics of bismuth doped silica fibers,” Opt. Mater. 31(2), 223–228 (2008). [CrossRef]

12.

T. Suzuki and Y. Ohishi, “Ultrabroadband near-infrared emission from Bi-doped Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 glass,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 88(19), 191912–3 (2006). [CrossRef]

13.

Y. Arai, T. Suzuki, Y. Ohishi, S. Morimoto, and S. Khonthon, “Ultrabroadband near-infrared emission from a colorless bismuth-doped glass,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90(26), 261110–3 (2007). [CrossRef]

14.

J. J. Ren, J. R. Qiu, D. P. Chen, X. Hu, X. W. Jiang, and C. S. Zhu, “Luminescence properties of bismuth-doped lime silicate glasses,” J. Alloy. Comp. 463(1-2), L5–L8 (2008). [CrossRef]

15.

S. Yoo, M. P. Kalita, J. Nilsson, and J. Sahu, “Excited state absorption measurement in the 900-1250 nm wavelength range for bismuth-doped silicate fibers,” Opt. Lett. 34(4), 530–532 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

I. A. Bufetov and E. M. Dianov, “Bi-doped fiber lasers,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(7), 487–504 (2009). [CrossRef]

17.

Y. Fujimoto and M. Nakatsuka, “Optical amplification in bismuth-doped silica glass,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 82(19), 3325–3326 (2003). [CrossRef]

18.

I. Razdobreev, L. Bigot, V. Pureur, A. Favre, G. Bouwmans, and M. Douay, “Efficient all-fiber bismuth-doped laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 90(3), 031103–3 (2007). [CrossRef]

19.

S. F. Zhou, H. F. Dong, H. P. Zeng, J. H. Hao, J. X. Chen, and J. R. Qiu, “Infrared luminescence and amplification properties of Bi-doped GeO2-Ga2O3-Al2O3 glasses,” J. Appl. Phys. 103(10), 103532–4 (2008). [CrossRef]

20.

Q. Qian, Q. Y. Zhang, G. F. Yang, Z. M. Yang, and Z. H. Jiang, “Enhanced broadband near-infrared emission from Bi-doped glasses by codoping with metal oxides,” J. Appl. Phys. 104(4), 043518–3 (2008). [CrossRef]

21.

J. Ruan, Y. Z. Chi, X. F. Liu, G. P. Dong, G. Lin, D. P. Chen, E. Wu, and J. R. Qiu, “Enhanced near-infrared emission and broadband optical amplification in Yb-Bi co-doped germanosilicate glasses,” J. Appl. Phys., J. Phys. D 42(15), 155102–6 (2009). [CrossRef]

22.

J. Ruan, E. Wu, B. T. Wu, H. P. Zeng, Q. Zhang, G. P. Dong, Y. B. Qiao, D. P. Chen, and J. R. Qiu, “Spectral properties and broadband optical amplification of Yb-Bi codoped MgO-Al2O3-ZnO-SiO2 glasses,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 26(4), 778–782 (2009). [CrossRef]

23.

V. V. Dvoyrin, A. V. Kir'yanov, V. M. Mashinsky, O. I. Medvedkov, A. A. Umnikov, A. N. Guryanov, and E. M. Dianov, “Absorption, Gain, and Laser Action in BismuthDoped Aluminosilicate Optical Fibers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 46(2), 182–190 (2010). [CrossRef]

24.

T. Haruna, J. Iihara, and M. Onishi, “Bismuth-doped silicate glass fiber for ultra-broadband amplification media,” Proc. SPIE 6389, 638903 (2006). [CrossRef]

25.

M. P. Kalita, S. Yoo, and J. Sahu, “Bismuth doped fiber laser and study of unsaturable loss and pump induced absorption in laser performance,” Opt. Express 16(25), 21032–21038 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(160.2750) Materials : Glass and other amorphous materials
(160.5690) Materials : Rare-earth-doped materials
(250.5230) Optoelectronics : Photoluminescence

ToC Category:
Materials

History
Original Manuscript: March 25, 2010
Revised Manuscript: May 24, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: June 4, 2010
Published: August 17, 2010

Citation
Nengli Dai, Bing Xu, Zuowen Jiang, Jingang Peng, Haiqing Li, Huaixun Luan, Luyun Yang, and Jinyan Li, "Effect of Yb3+ concentration on the broadband emission intensity and peak wavelength shift in Yb/Bi ions co-doped silica-based glasses," Opt. Express 18, 18642-18648 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-18-18642


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References

  1. V. V. Dvoyrin, V. M. Mashinsky, L. I. Bulatov, I. A. Bufetov, A. V. Shubin, M. A. Melkumov, E. F. Kustov, E. M. Dianov, A. A. Umnikov, V. F. Khopin, M. V. Yashkov, and A. N. Guryanov, “Bismuth-doped-glass optical fibers--a new active medium for lasers and amplifiers,” Opt. Lett. 31(20), 2966–2968 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  2. S. V. Firstov, I. A. Bufetov, V. F. Khopin, A. V. Shubin, A. M. Smirnov, L. D. Iskhakova, N. N. Vechkanov, A. N. Guryanov, and E. M. Dianov, “2 W bismuth doped fiber lasers in the wavelength range 1300-1500 nm and variation of Bi-doped fiber parameters with core composition,” Laser Phys. Lett. 6(9), 665–670 (2009). [CrossRef]
  3. E. M. Dianov, A. V. Shubin, M. A. Melkumov, O. I. Medvedkov, and I. A. Bufetov, “High-power cw bismuth-fiber lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 24(8), 1749–1755 (2007). [CrossRef]
  4. J. Gopinath, H. Shen, H. Sotobayashi, E. Ippen, T. Hasegawa, T. Nagashima, and N. Sugimoto, “Highly nonlinear bismuth-oxide fiber for smooth supercontinuum generation at 1.5 microm,” Opt. Express 12(23), 5697–5702 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. Y. Fujimoto and M. Nakatsuka, “Infrared luminescence from bismuth-doped silica glass,” Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 40(Part 2, No. 3B), L279–L281 (2001). [CrossRef]
  6. M. Y. Peng, J. R. Qiu, D. P. Chen, X. G. Meng, and C. S. Zhu, “Broadband infrared luminescence from Li2O-Al2O3-ZnO-SiO2 glasses doped with Bi2O3,” Opt. Express 13(18), 6892–6898 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. M. Y. Peng, J. R. Qiu, D. P. Chen, X. G. Meng, I. Y. Yang, X. W. Jiang, and C. S. Zhu, “Bismuth- and aluminum-codoped germanium oxide glasses for super-broadband optical amplification,” Opt. Lett. 29(17), 1998–2000 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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