OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 20 — Sep. 27, 2010
  • pp: 20979–20987
« Show journal navigation

Power calculation of wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO laser

Zhiyun Huang, Gaoming Li, and Yishen Qiu  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 20, pp. 20979-20987 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.020979


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (944 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

A theoretical model is presented describing continuous-wave operation about wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO (Yb3+:Lu2SiO5) laser. In LSO host, Yb3+ ion occupies two different Lu3+ sites and the spectrum exhibits the inhomogeneously broadened property. Working as a computable model, it takes into account the pump absorption saturation, the re-absorption of laser, and the full spectral information of the laser transition. The calculated results are compared with the experimental results, and it verifies the validity of the model. Then the laser performances for different Yb3+ concentration, crystal length, and the transmission of the output mirror are predicted.

© 2010 OSA

1. Introduction

An increasing number of Yb3+-doped oxyorthosilicate crystals have been reported in recent years, such as Yb3+:LSO (Yb3+:Lu2SiO5) [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

6

6. D. W. Cooke, R. E. Muenchausen, K. J. McClellan, and B. L. Bennett, “Spectral emission of rare-earth doped Lu2SiO5 single crystals,” Opt. Mater. 27(12), 1781–1786 (2005). [CrossRef]

], Yb3+:YSO (Yb3+:Y2SiO5) [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

4

4. F. Thibault, D. Pelenc, F. Druon, Y. Zaouter, M. Jacquemet, and P. Georges, “Efficient diode-pumped Yb3+:Y2SiO5 and Yb3+:Lu2SiO5 high-power femtosecond laser operation,” Opt. Lett. 31(10), 1555–1557 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], Yb3+:SSO (Yb3+:Sc2SiO5) [2

2. S. Campos, J. Petit, B. Viana, S. Jandi, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic investigation of the laser materials Yb3+:RE2SiO5, RE=Y, Sc, Lu,” Proc. SPIE Europe 5460, 335–343 (2004).

,3

3. S. Campos, A. Denoyer, S. Jandi, B. Viana, D. Vivien, P. Loiseau, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic studies of Yb3+-doped rare earth orthosilicate crystals,” J. Phys. Condens. Matter 16(25), 4579–4590 (2004). [CrossRef]

], Yb3+:GSO (Yb3+:Gd2SiO5) [7

7. W. Li, Q. Hao, H. Zhai, H. Zeng, W. Lu, G. Zhao, C. Yan, L. Su, and J. Xu, “Low-threshold and continuously tunable Yb:Gd2SiO5 laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(10), 101125 (2006). [CrossRef]

], etc. Their spectroscopic properties have been studied carefully. In these crystals, since Yb3+ occupies two different RE3+ sites, their spectrum exhibits the inhomogeneously broadened property, and the bandwiths of the absorption and emission spectrum are wide. The latter character enables Yb3+-doped oxyorthosilicate crystals to be used as the wavelength tunable gain media and the ultra-short pulse lasers. For example, the emission bandwidth of Yb3+:LSO is over 100 nm, and the laser wavelength tuning range is from 1025 nm to 1100 nm [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. For Yb3+:LSO and Yb3+:YSO, the pulse duration could be as short as 260 fs and 122 fs, respectively [4

4. F. Thibault, D. Pelenc, F. Druon, Y. Zaouter, M. Jacquemet, and P. Georges, “Efficient diode-pumped Yb3+:Y2SiO5 and Yb3+:Lu2SiO5 high-power femtosecond laser operation,” Opt. Lett. 31(10), 1555–1557 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Then in this paper, a wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO laser model is developed. The model is compared with the experimental results, and it verifies the validity of the model to some extent. Then by the proposed model, the impact of Yb3+ concentration and the crystal length on the wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO laser performance is predicted.

2. Model

In Yb3+:LSO crystal, Yb3+ occupies two differente Lu3+ sites equally, and it gives rise to the wide absorption and emission bands [2

2. S. Campos, J. Petit, B. Viana, S. Jandi, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic investigation of the laser materials Yb3+:RE2SiO5, RE=Y, Sc, Lu,” Proc. SPIE Europe 5460, 335–343 (2004).

]. In Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Energy level diagram of Yb3+:LSO crystal, where solid line represents the laser transition, dot line represents the pump transition, dash line represents the thermal redistribution.
, the energy level diagram of Yb3+:LSO is given.

As shown in the figure, after Yb3+ ion of the ground Stark level (l 1) absorbed the pump power, it transits to the corresponding Stark level of 2F5/2 manifold, and then redistributs thermally between the Stark levels of two sites. By this mechanism, it seems the 2F5/2 manifold is composed of 6 Stark levels and the 2F7/2 manifold is composed of 7 Stark levels, and Yb3+:LSO crystal acts as the homogeneously broadened gain medium approximately. Because Yb3+ ion distributes equally between two sites, the degeneracy of the first Stark level of 2F7/2 manifold (El 1) should be regarded as 2.

Then the total population for 2F5/2 manifold of two sites is governed by [15

15. G. L. Bourdet and E. Bartnicki, “Generalized formula for continuous-wave end-pumped Yb-doped material amplifier gain and laser output power in various pumping configurations,” Appl. Opt. 45(36), 9203–9209 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]
dNu(ρ,z)dt=Ip(ρ,z)hνpσpΔNp(ρ,z)I(ν,ρ,z)hνi,jσij(ν)ΔNij(ρ,z)Nu(ρ,z)τf
(1)
ΔNp(ρ,z)=fl1N0(fu2+fl1)Nu(ρ,z)
(2a)
ΔNij(ρ,z)=(fui+flj)Nu(ρ,z)fljN0
(2b)
where ρ and z are the radial and longitudinal coordinate. Nu(ρ,z) is the population of the upper manifold, ΔNp(ρ,z) is the population participating in the pump process, ΔNij(ρ,z) is the inversion population between the ith (i = 1, 2, …, 6) Stark level of 2F5/2 manifold and the jth (j = 1, 2, …, 7) Stark level of 2F7/2 manifold. One should note that the degeneracy of the first Stark level of 2F7/2 manifold (El 1) is 2. Ip(ρ,z) and I(ν,ρ,z) are the pump and laser intensities depending on z location. h is Plank constant, νp and ν are the frequencies of the pump and laser beams resprectively. N 0 is Yb3+ concentration, and τf is the fluorescence lifetime with concentration of N 0. σp is the absorption cross section, σij(ν) is the emission cross section at frequency ν and it represents the transition between the ith Stark level of 2F5/2 manifold and the jth Stark level of 2F7/2 manifold. fui and fli are Boltzmann occupation factors of the ith Stark level in 2F5/2 manifold and the jth Stark level in 2F7/2 manifold, and they are calculated by
fui=guiexp(Eui/kT)i=16guiexp(Eui/kT)
(3a)
flj=gljexp(Elj/kT)j=17gljexp(Elj/kT)
(3b)
where gui and glj are the degeneracies of Eui and Elj levels. Here we should note that gl 1 = 2 and others equal 1. From Fig. 1, we could see 978 nm pump wavelength is corresponding to the transition of the zero line of site I. Also stated in Ref [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

], 978 nm pump wavelength is optimum. Then in our model, we choose 978 nm as the pump wavelength, as Eq. (2)a) implies. From Eqs. (1), (2a) and (2b), we have
ΔNp(ρ,z)=fl1τf+I(ν,ρ,z)hνα(ν)1τf+Ip(ρ,z)hνpσp(fu2+fl1)+I(ν,ρ,z)hνβ(ν)N0
(4a)
ΔNij(ρ,z)=Ip(ρ,z)hνpσp(fuifl1fu2flj)+I(ν,ρ,z)hν[fuii,jfljσij(ν)flji,jfuiσij(ν)]fljτf1τf+Ip(ρ,z)hνpσp(fu2+fl1)+I(ν,ρ,z)hνβ(ν)N0
(4b)
ΔNij(ρ,z)=fuifl1fu2fljfu2+fl1N0fui+fljfu2+fl1ΔNp(ρ,z)
(5)
where α(ν)=i,j(fuifl1fu2flj)σij(ν) , β(ν)=i,j(fui+flj)σij(ν) . Inside the crystal, the pump and laser powers obey
dPp±(z)Pp±(z)dz=2π0σpΔNp(ρ,z)φp(ρ,z)ρdρ
(6a)
dP±(ν,z)P±(ν,z)dz=±2π0σij(ν)ΔNij(ρ,z)φ(ν,ρ,z)ρdρδ
(6b)
where Pp ± (z) and P ± (ν,z) are the pump and laser powers along the positive and negative directions. Pp(z) and P(ν,z) represent the sum of the pump and laser powers of the two directions. δ is the internal loss per unit crystal length. ϕp(ρ,z) and ϕ(ν,ρ,z) are the intensity distributions of the pump and laser beams. For Gaussian beams, the intensity distributions of the pump and laser beams could be written as
φp(ρ,z)=2πwp2(z)exp[2ρ2wp2(z)]
(7a)
φ(ν,ρ,z)=2πw2(ν,z)exp[2ρ2w2(ν,z)]
(7b)
where wp(z) and w(ν,z) are the spot radii of the pump and laser beams at location z. For plane-concave cavity, the values of wp(z) and w(ν,z) obey
wp(z)=wp01+νp2z2π2wp04
(8a)
w(ν,z)=w0(ν)1+ν2z2π2w04(ν)
(8b)
where wp 0 and w 0(ν) are the spot radii of the pump and laser beam waists. For pump beam, the value of wp 0 is determined by the pump source and the input configuration. For laser beam, inside the resonator, the value of w 0(ν) is determined by the resonant cavity. It could be calculated by
w0(ν)=(cπν)2l(Rinl)(Roul)(Rin+Roul)(Rin+Rou2l)24
(9)
where c is speed light, Rin and Rou are the curvature radius of the input and output mirror, and l is the cavity length. From Eqs. (6)a) and (6b), the boundary conditions are:
Pp(z)=Pp+(0)exp[2Γ(L)Γ(z)]
(10a)
P(ν,z)=P+(ν,0)exp[G(ν,z)2δz]
(10b)
G(ν,L)=12ln(1T)δL
(10c)
where Γ(z) = ln[Pp +(z)/Pp +(0)], G(ν,z) = ln[P +(ν,z)/P +(ν,0)], T is the transmission of the output mirror, and L is the crystal lenght. Here, the back-reflected pumping is considered and the reflectivity of the output mirror at the pump wavelength is assumed to be 1, i. e., the pump power is reflected totally at the output mirror. Inserting Eqs. (4)a) and (4b) into Eqs. (6)a) and (6b) gives
dΓ(z)dz=σpN001fl1τf+P+(ν,0)[e2G(ν,z)+e2δz]α(ν)πw2(ν,z)hνeG(ν,z)ya1τf+Pp+(0)[e2Γ(z)+e2Γ(L)]σp(fu2+fl1)πwp2(z)hνpeΓ(z)y+P+(ν,0)[e2G(ν,z)+e2δz]β(ν)πw2(ν,z)hνeG(ν,z)yady
(11a)
dG(ν,z)dz=N001Pp+(0)[e2Γ(z)+e2Γ(L)]σpα(ν)πwp2(z)hνpeΓ(z)yi,jfljτfσij(ν)1τf+Pp+(0)[e2Γ(z)+e2Γ(L)]σp(fu2+fl1)πwp2(z)hνpeΓ(z)y+P+(ν,0)[e2G(ν,z)+e2δz]β(ν)πw2(ν,z)hνeG(ν,z)yadyaδ
(11b)
where a = wp 2(z)/w 2(ν,z) and the boundary conditions are used. For the so-called mode matching, the approximations wp(z)≈w(ν,z), ϕp(ρ,z)≈ϕ(ν,ρ,z), and a≈1 are adopted. Then by Eqs. (5), (6a), and (6b), we obtain

(fu2+fl1)σp[G(ν,z)+δz]=σpN0α(z)+β(ν)Γ(z)
(12a)
Γ(L)=(fu2+fl1)σpln1TσpN0α(ν)Lβ(ν)
(12b)

For the given incident pump power and the resonant cavity, Pp +(0), G(ν,L), and Γ(L) are known. Then for a guess P +(ν,0), G(ν,L) could be solved numerically by Eq. (11)a) or (11b). If the solved G(ν,L) is in agreement with that derived from the boundary condition, the output power is Po(ν) = P +(ν,0)exp[G(ν,L)]T. Otherwise, another P +(ν,0) is assumed and the calculation process continuous.

3. Results and discussions

The emission spectrum of Yb3+:LSO crystal are fit by the superimposition of six Lorentzian transitions, since Yb3+:LSO acts as the homogeneously broadened gain medium, and the results are given in Table 1

Table 1. Analytical results of Yb3+:LSO emission spectruma

table-icon
View This Table
. It seems the fit bands around 999 nm, 1033 nm, and 1083 nm are resulted from two transitions, and so the emission cross section of the band should be regarded as that of the sum of two transitions. It is difficult to determine each emission cross section of two transitons. Then for the sake of simplicity, the emission cross section of each transition is regarded as the half emission cross section of the band. This approximation may deviate from the truth. However, as shown in the following comparison between the experimental and the calculated results, the deviation is acceptable.

Firstly, the model is applied to the experiment in order to verify the validity of the model. The experimental data are taken from other group [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. The calculated and experimental results are plotted in Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Calculated and experimental output power, where Pp +(0) = 14 W, N 0 = 8 at.%, L = 2 mm, wp(0) = 100 μm, T = 0.04, and δ = 0.01 cm−1.
, and the values of the experimental parameters are [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

]: Pp +(0) = 14 W, λp = 978 nm, σp = 1.0 × 10−20 cm2, τf = 0.95 ms [2

2. S. Campos, J. Petit, B. Viana, S. Jandi, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic investigation of the laser materials Yb3+:RE2SiO5, RE=Y, Sc, Lu,” Proc. SPIE Europe 5460, 335–343 (2004).

], N 0 = 8 at.%, 1 at. % = 1.95 × 1020 cm−3, L = 2 mm, wp 0 = 100 μm, T = 0.04, and δ = 0.01 cm−1. Here the absorption cross section is calculated directly from the measured absorption coefficient, and X polarized emission cross section is adopted in the calculation. The experimental curve is taken from Fig. 6 of Ref [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. As shown in this figure, for the experimental results, the wavelength tuning range is from 1026 nm to 1098 nm, and the power peaks locate at 1057 nm, 1068 nm, and 1083 nm; for the calculated results, the wavelength tuning range is from 1026 nm to 1095 nm, and the power peaks locate at 1044 nm, 1057 nm, and 1083nm. For the tuning range, it seems the experimental and theoretical results are almost the same. Moreover, the bandwith of more than 4 W output is almost the same for experimental and calculated results. However, for the output power, the difference between the experimental and theoretical results is a little large.

The difference may come from some factors which are not considered in our model. One possible factor is the thermal effect. As well known, the heat generation is unavoidable during the laser operation and impacts the laser performance. As can be seen from the absorption and emission spectra [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

,2

2. S. Campos, J. Petit, B. Viana, S. Jandi, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic investigation of the laser materials Yb3+:RE2SiO5, RE=Y, Sc, Lu,” Proc. SPIE Europe 5460, 335–343 (2004).

], the preferential lasing axis is X axis. In our calculation, X polarized emission cross section is adopted. In the experiment, Yb3+:LSO crystal is placed with X axis in the plane of cavity [1

1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. Inside cavity, no linear polarizer is inserted, and the output power may not be linearly polarized. This may also account for the discrepancy. Finally, the more accurate analysis of the emission spectrum may help to improve the calculated result. As shown in the first paragraph of section 3, the emission cross section of the band around 999 nm, 1033 nm, and 1083 nm should be regarded as that of the sum of two transitions. But in our calculation, since it is difficult to distinguish these two transitions, the emission cross section of each transition is regarded as the half emission cross section of the band.

After the validity of the model is verified, the tunable laser performances of Yb3+:LSO could be predicted. In Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Calculated output powers for different Yb3+ concentrations, where Pp +(0) = 10 W, T = 0.01, L = 1 mm, δ = 0 cm−1, and N 0 = 5 at.%, 6 at.%, and 8 at.%.
, the laser performance is calculated at different Yb3+ concentration, where Pp +(0) = 10 W, T = 0.01, L = 1 mm, δ = 0 cm−1, and N 0 = 5 at.%, 6 at.%, and 8 at.%. For these calculations, the fluorescence lifetimes are assumed to be 0.95 ms for three cases since the variation of the concentration is not large. As can be seen in the figure, of all the concentrations considered, the laser performance for 8 at.% sample is the best because its wavelength tuning range is the widest and its output power is the highest. However, for the given crystal length, we could not conclude from this figure that high Yb3+ concentration is good for the laser performance. If Yb3+ concentration is too high, the reabsorption and the possible concentration quenching are serious, and these two factors reduce the output power.

Figure 4
Fig. 4 Plots of the calculated output powers for different crystal length, where Pp +(0) = 10 W, T = 0.01, N 0 = 8 at.%, δ = 0 cm−1, and L = 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm.
shows the laser performance varying with the crystal length, where Pp +(0) = 10 W, T = 0.01, N 0 = 8 at.%, δ = 0 cm−1, and L = 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 2 mm, and 3 mm. Since Yb3+ laser is quasi-three level system, too long crystal length is not very good for the laser performance, as shown in Fig. 4. Of all the three lengths, for 3.0 mm, the wavelength tuning range is the narrowest because of the reabsorption of Yb3+ ion. For the short crystal length, as the curve of 0.5 mm shows, the wavelength tuning range is not wide either, because 0.5 mm crystal length only absorbs about 50% incident pump power for single pass and about 80% for reflected pass. Then in order to obtain the good laser performance, the right crystal length should be chosen.

The impact of the transmission of the output mirror on the laser performance is plotted in Fig. 5
Fig. 5 Calculated output powers for different transmission of the output mirror, where Pp +(0) = 10 W, N 0 = 8 at.%, L = 1 mm, and T = 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.03.
, where Pp +(0) = 10 W, N 0 = 8 at.%, L = 1 mm, and T = 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.03. Low transmission gives rise to the low cavity loss and the low threshold as well as the wide wavelength tuning range. At some wavelengths, for low transmission, the reflectivity of the output mirror is not large enough to extract the laser power from the resonant cavity, which lowers the output power. High transmission means the high cavity loss, which lowers the output power and narrows the wavelength tuning range. As shown in Fig. 5, the tuning range of T = 0.001 is the widest, and that of T = 0.03 is narrowest.

4. Conclusion

Compared with Nd3+ crystal, the emission bandwith of Yb3+ crystal is wide. This property enables Yb3+ crystal to be used in the fields of wavelength tunable laser and short pulse laser. Though some models about Yb3+ laser have been developed, they are built to treat the homogeneously broadened lasers. None of them could be used to calculate the wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO laser. In this paper, a numerical model is developed for wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO laser, which takes into account the spectral information of the laser transition.

The calculated result agrees with the experimental result to some extent. The predictions about the impact of Yb3+ concentration, the crystal length, and the transmission of the output mirror on the wavelength tunable Yb3+: LSO laser performance are given. In Fig. 3, it seems 8 at % is the best concentration in the three concentrations considered. As shown in Fig. 4, of all the crystal length considered, it may be difficult to determine which crystal length is the best. However, we could still conclude the laser performances of 1 mm and 2 mm are better than those of 0.5 mm and 3mm. In Fig. 5, of all the transmission of the output mirror considered, it seems 0.001 is suitable though in some wavelength, its output power is not the highest. Therefore these calculation implies that to obtain the satisfactory laser performance, the optimization about Yb3+ concentration, crystal length, and the transmission of the output mirror needs to be performed. In fact, for Yb3+ lasers, such as Yb3+:YAG laser, it exists the optimum Yb3+ concentration, the optimum crystal length, and the optimum transmission of the output mirror.

The model could be applied not only to wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO laser, but also to other wavelength tunable Yb3+-doped oxyorthosilicate lasers.

Acknowledgements

This work is supported by the Fund of Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (2008DP173016) under grant 2010KL0014.

References and links

1.

M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]

2.

S. Campos, J. Petit, B. Viana, S. Jandi, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic investigation of the laser materials Yb3+:RE2SiO5, RE=Y, Sc, Lu,” Proc. SPIE Europe 5460, 335–343 (2004).

3.

S. Campos, A. Denoyer, S. Jandi, B. Viana, D. Vivien, P. Loiseau, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic studies of Yb3+-doped rare earth orthosilicate crystals,” J. Phys. Condens. Matter 16(25), 4579–4590 (2004). [CrossRef]

4.

F. Thibault, D. Pelenc, F. Druon, Y. Zaouter, M. Jacquemet, and P. Georges, “Efficient diode-pumped Yb3+:Y2SiO5 and Yb3+:Lu2SiO5 high-power femtosecond laser operation,” Opt. Lett. 31(10), 1555–1557 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

L. Zheng, G. Zhao, L. Su, and J. Xu, “Comparison of optical properties between ytterbium-doped Lu2SiO5 (Yb:LSO) and ytterbium-doped Lu2Si2O7 (Yb:LPS) laser crystals,” J. Alloy. Comp. 471(1-2), 157–161 (2009). [CrossRef]

6.

D. W. Cooke, R. E. Muenchausen, K. J. McClellan, and B. L. Bennett, “Spectral emission of rare-earth doped Lu2SiO5 single crystals,” Opt. Mater. 27(12), 1781–1786 (2005). [CrossRef]

7.

W. Li, Q. Hao, H. Zhai, H. Zeng, W. Lu, G. Zhao, C. Yan, L. Su, and J. Xu, “Low-threshold and continuously tunable Yb:Gd2SiO5 laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(10), 101125 (2006). [CrossRef]

8.

Z. Huang, Y. Huang, M. Huang, and Z. Luo, “Optimizing the doping concentration and the crystal thickness in Yb3+-doped microchip lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20(10), 2061–2067 (2003). [CrossRef]

9.

Z. Huang and G. L. Bourdet, “Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier,” Appl. Opt. 46(14), 2703–2708 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

10.

Z. Huang, G. Li, and Y. Qiu, “Modeling of short-pulse generation by Yb3+:YAG crystal in an active continuous-wave-injected ring cavity using different end pump methods,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(9), 1437–1441 (2008). [CrossRef]

11.

T. Taira, W. M. Tulloch, and R. L. Byer, “Modeling of quasi-three-level lasers and operation of cw Yb:YAG lasers,” Appl. Opt. 36(9), 1867–1874 (1997). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

A. Brenier, “A new evaluation of Yb3+-doped crystals for laser applications,” J. Lumin. 92(3), 199–204 (2001). [CrossRef]

13.

A. K. Jafari and M. Aas, “Continuous-wave theory of Yb:YAG end-pumped thin-disk lasers,” Appl. Opt. 48(1), 106–113 (2009). [CrossRef]

14.

P. Peterson, M. P. Sharma, and A. Gavrielides, “Modeling of Yb:YAG tuning curves,” Opt. Commun. 134(1-6), 155–160 (1997). [CrossRef]

15.

G. L. Bourdet and E. Bartnicki, “Generalized formula for continuous-wave end-pumped Yb-doped material amplifier gain and laser output power in various pumping configurations,” Appl. Opt. 45(36), 9203–9209 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

OCIS Codes
(140.3380) Lasers and laser optics : Laser materials
(140.3430) Lasers and laser optics : Laser theory
(140.3600) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, tunable
(140.3615) Lasers and laser optics : Lasers, ytterbium

ToC Category:
Lasers and Laser Optics

History
Original Manuscript: May 18, 2010
Revised Manuscript: July 1, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: September 10, 2010
Published: September 20, 2010

Citation
Zhiyun Huang, Gaoming Li, and Yishen Qiu, "Power calculation of wavelength tunable Yb3+:LSO laser," Opt. Express 18, 20979-20987 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-20-20979


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. M. Jacquemet, C. Jacquemet, N. Janel, F. Druon, F. Balembois, P. Georges, J. Petit, B. Viana, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Efficient laser action of Yb:LSO and Yb:YSO oxyorthosilicates crystals under high-power diode-pumping,” Appl. Phys. B 80(2), 171–176 (2005). [CrossRef]
  2. S. Campos, J. Petit, B. Viana, S. Jandi, D. Vivien, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic investigation of the laser materials Yb3+:RE2SiO5, RE=Y, Sc, Lu,” Proc. SPIE Europe 5460, 335–343 (2004).
  3. S. Campos, A. Denoyer, S. Jandi, B. Viana, D. Vivien, P. Loiseau, and B. Ferrand, “Spectroscopic studies of Yb3+-doped rare earth orthosilicate crystals,” J. Phys. Condens. Matter 16(25), 4579–4590 (2004). [CrossRef]
  4. F. Thibault, D. Pelenc, F. Druon, Y. Zaouter, M. Jacquemet, and P. Georges, “Efficient diode-pumped Yb3+:Y2SiO5 and Yb3+:Lu2SiO5 high-power femtosecond laser operation,” Opt. Lett. 31(10), 1555–1557 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. L. Zheng, G. Zhao, L. Su, and J. Xu, “Comparison of optical properties between ytterbium-doped Lu2SiO5 (Yb:LSO) and ytterbium-doped Lu2Si2O7 (Yb:LPS) laser crystals,” J. Alloy. Comp. 471(1-2), 157–161 (2009). [CrossRef]
  6. D. W. Cooke, R. E. Muenchausen, K. J. McClellan, and B. L. Bennett, “Spectral emission of rare-earth doped Lu2SiO5 single crystals,” Opt. Mater. 27(12), 1781–1786 (2005). [CrossRef]
  7. W. Li, Q. Hao, H. Zhai, H. Zeng, W. Lu, G. Zhao, C. Yan, L. Su, and J. Xu, “Low-threshold and continuously tunable Yb:Gd2SiO5 laser,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 89(10), 101125 (2006). [CrossRef]
  8. Z. Huang, Y. Huang, M. Huang, and Z. Luo, “Optimizing the doping concentration and the crystal thickness in Yb3+-doped microchip lasers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 20(10), 2061–2067 (2003). [CrossRef]
  9. Z. Huang and G. L. Bourdet, “Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier,” Appl. Opt. 46(14), 2703–2708 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  10. Z. Huang, G. Li, and Y. Qiu, “Modeling of short-pulse generation by Yb3+:YAG crystal in an active continuous-wave-injected ring cavity using different end pump methods,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 25(9), 1437–1441 (2008). [CrossRef]
  11. T. Taira, W. M. Tulloch, and R. L. Byer, “Modeling of quasi-three-level lasers and operation of cw Yb:YAG lasers,” Appl. Opt. 36(9), 1867–1874 (1997). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. A. Brenier, “A new evaluation of Yb3+-doped crystals for laser applications,” J. Lumin. 92(3), 199–204 (2001). [CrossRef]
  13. A. K. Jafari and M. Aas, “Continuous-wave theory of Yb:YAG end-pumped thin-disk lasers,” Appl. Opt. 48(1), 106–113 (2009). [CrossRef]
  14. P. Peterson, M. P. Sharma, and A. Gavrielides, “Modeling of Yb:YAG tuning curves,” Opt. Commun. 134(1-6), 155–160 (1997). [CrossRef]
  15. G. L. Bourdet and E. Bartnicki, “Generalized formula for continuous-wave end-pumped Yb-doped material amplifier gain and laser output power in various pumping configurations,” Appl. Opt. 45(36), 9203–9209 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.

Figures

Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3
 
Fig. 4 Fig. 5
 

« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited