OSA's Digital Library

Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 24 — Nov. 22, 2010
  • pp: 24868–24880
« Show journal navigation

Huge light scattering from active anisotropic spherical particles

Xiaofeng Fan, Zexiang Shen, and Boris Luk’yanchuk  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 24, pp. 24868-24880 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.024868


View Full Text Article

Acrobat PDF (979 KB)





Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Browse by Journal and Year


   


Lookup Conference Papers

Close Browse Journals / Lookup Meetings

Article Tools

Share
Citations

Abstract

The light scattering by a spherical particle with radial anisotropic permittivity ε and permeability μ are discussed in detail by expanding Mie theory. With the modified vector potential formulation, the electric anisotropy effects on scattering efficiency are addressed by studying the extinction, scattering, absorption and radar cross sections following the change of the transverse permittivity εt, the longitudinal permittivity εr and the particle size q. The huge scattering cross sections are shown by considering the possible coupling between active medium and plasmon polaritons and this will be possible to result in spaser from the active plasmons of small particle.

© 2010 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

Controlling light energy into nanometer scale is one of the rapidly growing fields of material physics and nanotechnology[1

1. M. L. Brongersma and P. G. Kik, Surface plasmon nanophotonics (Springer Series in Optical Sciences, Springer, 2007), Vol. 131. [CrossRef]

, 2

2. S. A. Maier, Plasmonics: fundamentals and applications (Springer, 2007).

, 3

3. B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater. 9, 707–715 (2010). [CrossRef]

] which hosts a lot of important research directions with potential applications such as high-resolution optical imaging[4

4. P. Muhlschlegel, H.-J. Eisler, O. J. F. Martin, B. Hecht, and D. W. Pohl, “Resonant optical antennas,” Science 308, 1607–1608 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 5

5. J. A. Gordon and R. W. Ziolkowski, “The design and simulated performance of a coated nano-particle laser,” Opt. Express 15, 2622–2653 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], small-scale sensing techniques[7

7. M. T. Hill, “Lasing in metallic-coated nanocavities,” Nature Photon. 1, 589–594 (2007). [CrossRef]

, 8

8. C. Genet and T. W. Ebbesen, “Light in tiny holes,” Nature 445, 39–46 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], and numerous biomedical applications[9

9. B. Liedberg, C. Nylander, and I. Lundstrom, “Surface plasmon resonance for gas detection and biosensing,” Sens. Actuators 4, 299–304 (1983). [CrossRef]

, 10

10. C. A. Mirkin, R. L. Letsinger, R. C. Mucic, and J.J. Storhoff, “A DNA-based method for rationally assembling nanoparticles into macroscopic materials,” Nature 382, 607–609 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 11

11. A. J. Haes, L. Chang, W. L. Klein, and R. P. Van Duyne, “Detection of a biomarker for alzheimer’s disease from synthetic and clinical samples using a nanoscale optical biosensor,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2264–2271(2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 12

12. T. Rindzevicius, Y. Alaverdyan, A. Dahlin, F. Hook, D. S. Sutherland, and M. Kall, “Plasmonic sensing characteristics of single nanometric holes,” Nano Lett. 5, 2335–2339 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Presently, designing the metal/dielectric interface with the use of surface plasmon polaritons is considered to be an effective approach of manipulating light on nano scale. With the isolated small metal particle, the local electromagnetic field can be enhanced by the surface plasmons localized on the surface and thus be utilized to enhance Raman scattering[13

13. S. Nie and S. R. Emony, “Probing single molecules and single nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman scattering,” Science 275, 1102–1106 (1997). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 14

14. J. P. Kottmann and O. J. F. Martin, “Plasmon resonant coupling in metallic nanowires,” Opt. Express 8, 655–663 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], fluorescence of single molecule[15

15. P. Bharadwaj, P. Anger, and L. Novotny, “Nanoplasmonic enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence,” Nanotechnology 18, 044017 (2007). [CrossRef]

, 16

16. Y. Fu, J. Zhang, and J.R. Lakowicz, “Plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from single fluorophores end-linked to gold nanorods,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 5540–5541 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] and transfer resonantly the energy of exciton[17

17. P. Andrew and W. L. Barnes, “Energy transfer across a metal film mediated by surface plasmon polaritons,” Science 306, 1002–1005 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], and so on. With designing the proper periodic pattern on metal materials or the interface of active medium, dielectric and metal, the different plasmon modes can be hybridized and tune the resonance frequency for guiding electromagnetic wave on nanosized structure[18

18. P. Andrew and W.L. Barnes, “Förster energy transfer in an optical microcavity,” Science 290, 785–788 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 19

19. E. Prodan, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, and P. Nordlander, “A hybridization model for the plasmon response of complex nanostructures,” Science 302419–422, (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 20

20. H. Liu and P. Lalanne, “Microscopic theory of the extraordinary optical transmission,” Nature 452, 728–731 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 21

21. R. F. Oulton, V. J. Sorger, D. A. Genov, D. F. P. Pile, and X. Zhang, “A hybrid plasmonic waveguide for sub-wavelength confinement and long-range propagation,” Nat. Photonics 2, 496–500 (2008) [CrossRef]

] and lasing of semiconductor nano particle or fluorescence molecules in dielectric media with assistance of plasmons[22

22. M. Nezhad, K. Tetz, and Y. Fainman, “Gain assisted propagation of surface plasmon polaritons on planar metallic waveguides,” Opt. Express 12, 4072–4079 (2004) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 23

23. N. M. Lawandy, “Localized surface plasmon singularities in amplifying media,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 5040–5042 (2004). [CrossRef]

, 24

24. M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, M. Bahoura, J. Adegoke, C. E. Small, B. A. Ritzo, V. P. Drachev, and V. M. Shalaev, “Enhancement of surface plasmons in an Ag aggregate by optical gain in a dielectric medium,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3022–3024 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 25

25. J. Seidel, S. Grafstroum, and L. Eng, “Stimulated emission of surface plasmons at the interface between a silver film and an optically pumped dye solution,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 177401 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 26

26. M. A. Noginov, V. A. Podolskiy, G. Zhu, M. Mayy, M. Bahoura, J. A. Adegoke, B. A. Ritzo, and K. Reynolds, “Compensation of loss in propagating surface plasmon polariton by gain in adjacent dielectric medium,” Opt. Express 16, 1385–1392 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 27

27. D. J. Bergman and M. I. Stockman, “Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation: quantum generation of coherent surface plasmons in nanosystems,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 027402 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 28

28. M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, A. M. Belgrave, R. Bakker, V. M. Shalaev, E. E. Narimanov, S. Stout, E. Herz, T. Suteewong, and U. Wiesner, “Demonstration of a spaser-based nanolaser,” Nature 460, 1110–1112 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 29

29. M.I. Stockman, “Spasers explained,” Nat. Photonics 2, 327–329 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. Therefore, the anisotropic materials or designed metamaterials with anisotropy have been a subject of great interest, since the merging of plasmonics and these materials may open up a new perspective to control the electromagnetic wave, such as the achievement of negative index metamaterials in the optical frequencies[30

30. J. B. Pendry, “Negative refraction makes a perfect lens,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3966–3969 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Prodan et al. have studied the plasmon hybridization of complex nanoshell structures with a metallic shell and a dielectric core[31

31. E. Prodan and P. Nordlander, “Plasmon hybridization in spherical nanoparticles,” J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5444–5454 (2004) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

, 19

19. E. Prodan, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, and P. Nordlander, “A hybridization model for the plasmon response of complex nanostructures,” Science 302419–422, (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. The interaction of bare plasmon modes of individual surface is demonstrated. Furthermore, Bergman et al. predicted that the surface plasmon can be amplified by stimulated emission of radiation and thus result in lasing with the generator of coherent surface plasmons[27

27. D. J. Bergman and M. I. Stockman, “Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation: quantum generation of coherent surface plasmons in nanosystems,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 027402 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Recently, it was experimentally demonstrated that the spaser is realized on a conjugate structure with a metallic core and a dye-doped dielectric shell which is as an active medium to overcome the inherent loss of surface plasmon inside metal core[28

28. M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, A. M. Belgrave, R. Bakker, V. M. Shalaev, E. E. Narimanov, S. Stout, E. Herz, T. Suteewong, and U. Wiesner, “Demonstration of a spaser-based nanolaser,” Nature 460, 1110–1112 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In this paper, we study the fancy effect of light scattering on the small particles with radial anisotropic permittivity. Some progress has been made in this direction about spherical anisotropic structures[32

32. R. D. Graglia, P. L. E. Uslenghi, and R. S. Zich, “Moment method with isoparametric elements for three-dimensional anisotropic scatterers,” Proc. IEEE 77, 750–760 (1989). [CrossRef]

, 33

33. J. I. Dadap, J. Shan, K. B. Eisenthal, and T. F. Heinz, “Second-Harmonic Rayleigh scattering from a sphere of centrosymmetric material,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4045–4048 (1999). [CrossRef]

, 34

34. V. V. Varadan, A. Lakhtakia, and V. K. Varadan, “Scattering by three-dimensional anisotropic scatterers,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 37, 800–802 (1989). [CrossRef]

, 35

35. Y. L. Geng, X. B. Wu, L. W. Li, and B. R. Guan, “Mie scattering by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere,” Phys. Rev. E 70, 056609 (2004). [CrossRef]

, 36

36. B. Stout, M. Neviere, and E. Popov, “Mie scattering by an anisotropic object. Part I: Homogeneous sphere,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 1111–1123 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 37

37. B. Stout, M. Neviere, and E. Popov, “Mie scattering by an anisotropic object. Part II: Arbitrary-shaped object differential theory,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 1124–1134 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 38

38. C.-W. Qiu, L. W. Li, T.-S. Yeo, and S. Zouhdi, “Scattering by rotationally symmetric anisotropic spheres: Potential formulation and parametric studies,” Phys. Rev. E 75, 026609 (2007). [CrossRef]

, 39

39. B. S. Luk’yanchuk and C.-W. Qiu, “Enhanced scattering efficiencies in spherical particles with weakly dissipating anisotropic materials,” Appl. Phys. A 92,773 (2008) [CrossRef]

]. The method of moments, coupled-dipole methods, second-harmonic generation approach and expanded Mie theory have been developed to expand the field expressions[32

32. R. D. Graglia, P. L. E. Uslenghi, and R. S. Zich, “Moment method with isoparametric elements for three-dimensional anisotropic scatterers,” Proc. IEEE 77, 750–760 (1989). [CrossRef]

, 33

33. J. I. Dadap, J. Shan, K. B. Eisenthal, and T. F. Heinz, “Second-Harmonic Rayleigh scattering from a sphere of centrosymmetric material,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4045–4048 (1999). [CrossRef]

, 34

34. V. V. Varadan, A. Lakhtakia, and V. K. Varadan, “Scattering by three-dimensional anisotropic scatterers,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 37, 800–802 (1989). [CrossRef]

, 36

36. B. Stout, M. Neviere, and E. Popov, “Mie scattering by an anisotropic object. Part I: Homogeneous sphere,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 1111–1123 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. Some new effects of light scattering by anisotropic materials, such as the additional increase in field enhancement near surface plasmon resonance frequencies induced by anisotropy, have been analyzed[39

39. B. S. Luk’yanchuk and C.-W. Qiu, “Enhanced scattering efficiencies in spherical particles with weakly dissipating anisotropic materials,” Appl. Phys. A 92,773 (2008) [CrossRef]

]. Here, with modified Mie theory, we will analyze the space of parameters including the transverse permittivity εt, the longitudinal permittivity εr, the particle size a and wavelength of incident wave λ. We consider the anisotropy of permittivity ε results in the spherical particles have different properties in different directions, such as metallic property and light-active dielectric property. The huge light scattering is found in special region of parameter space after inspecting the extinction, scattering, absorption and radar cross section. This fantastic effect is suspected to be due to the coupling between active medium and plasmons and be possible to result in spaser.

2. Theoretical model

Different analytical methods have been developed to deal with the light scattering with medium with different structures[40

40. M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of optics, 7th ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999).

, 41

41. Edward J. Rothwell and Michael J. Cloud, Electromagnetics, 2nd ed. (CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2009).

]. For planar multilayered structures, the 3D Fourier transform technique was usually used to relate the space and spectral domains to the analysis of the waves and fields[42

42. W. C. Chew, Waves and fields in inhomogeneous media (Van Nostrand, New York, 1990).

, 43

43. W. Ren, “Contributions to the electromagnetic wave theory of bounded homogeneous anisotropic media,” Phys. Rev. E 47, 664–673 (1993). [CrossRef]

]. For the boundary-value problems and periodic structures, the Green’s functional technique as a kernel is used to solve the integral equation[44

44. C. T. Tai, Dyadic Green’s functions in electromagnetic theory, 2nd ed. (IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, 1994). [PubMed]

]. For the spherical and cylindrical structures, the Lorenz-Mie approach is a powerful method of separation of variables to expand angularly the electromagnetic field[45

45. A. L. Aden and M. Kerker, “Scattering of electromagnetic waves from two concentric spheres,” J. Appl. Phys. 22, 12421246 (1951). [CrossRef]

, 46

46. Z. S. Wu and Y. P. Wang, “Electromagnetic scattering for multilayered sphere: Recursive algorithms,” Radio Sci. 26, 13931401(1991). [CrossRef]

, 47

47. R. J. Tarento, K. H. Bennemann, P. Joyes, and J. Van de Walle, “Mie scattering of magnetic spheres,” Phys. Rev. E 69, 026606 (2004). [CrossRef]

, 48

48. P. W. Barber and S. C. Hill, Light scattering by particles: computational methods (World Scientific, Singapore, 1990). [CrossRef]

, 49

49. C. F. Bohren and D. R. Huffman, Absorption and scattering of light by small particles (Wiley, New York, 1983).

]. Here, we chose to modify the Mie theory to deal with the particle with radial anisotropy[38

38. C.-W. Qiu, L. W. Li, T.-S. Yeo, and S. Zouhdi, “Scattering by rotationally symmetric anisotropic spheres: Potential formulation and parametric studies,” Phys. Rev. E 75, 026609 (2007). [CrossRef]

, 40

40. M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of optics, 7th ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999).

].

We assume that the plane wave with the electric field polarized along the x axis is scattered by the particle immersed in homogeneous medium. Considering the scattering about monochromatic wave, the time dependence eiωt part can be suppressed and the electric and magnetic vectors satisfy the time-free Maxwell’s equations:
H=ik0ɛEandE=ik0μH,
(1)
where k0 is the wave vector of light in vacuum. The uniaxial anisotropy of particle is defined by the constitutive tensors of the permittivity and permeability as:
ɛ=(ɛr000ɛt000ɛt)andμ=(μr000μt000μt)
(2)
where the coordinate system is spherical coordinate, and εr, εt, μr and μt are the longitudinal permittivity, transverse permittivity, longitudinal permeability and transverse permeability, respectively. In general case, these four values εr, εt, μr and μt will be complex numbers, i.e. εr = Re[εr] + i Im[εr], εt = Re[εt] + i Im[εt], etc. As usual, the electric and magnetic vectors can be expressed by the Debye’s scaler potentials ΠTE and ΠTM. Thus, the Maxwell vector equations are transferred as the scaler equations about the magnetic ΠTE and electric ΠTM potentials, which are expressed as:
ɛrɛt2ΠTMr2+1r2sinθθ(sinθΠTMθ)+1r2sin2θ2ΠTMφ2+k02ɛrμtΠTM=0,
(3)
μrμr2ΠTEr2+1r2sinθθ(sinθΠTEθ)+1r2sin2θ2ΠTEφ2+k02ɛtμrΠTE=0,
(4)
for the scattering by particle with anisotropic permittivity ε and permeability μ. Solving these equations with corresponding boundary conditions, the scattering amplitudes Ble(electric) and Blm(magnetic) can be found to be as:
Ble=il+12l+1l(l+1)bleandBlm=il+12l+1l(l+1)blm,
(5)
with,
ble=ɛtΦl(k0a)Φv1(kta)μtΦl(k0a)Φv1(kta)ɛtξl(k0a)Φv1(kta)μtξl(k0a)Φv1(kta),
(6)
blm=ɛtΦl(k0a)Φv2(kta)μtΦl(k0a)Φv2(kta)ɛtξl(k0a)Φv2(kta)μtξl(k0a)Φv2(kta),
(7)
where kt=k0ɛtμt is the wave vector in anisotropic spheres. the functions Φl(x) and ξl(x) are given by
Φl(x)=πx2Jl+12(x),
(8)
ξl(x)=πx2(Jl+12(x)+iNl+12(x))
(9)
where Jl(x) and Nl(x) are usual Bessel function and Neumann function. The order v1 and v2 of the spherical Bessel function Φv1 and Φv2 are:
v1=[l(l+1)ɛtɛr+14]1/212,
(10)
and
v2=[l(l+1)μtμr+14]1/212.
(11)

With the solution about ΠTE and ΠTM, we can analyze the distribution of electromagnetic fields around the particle. The lost of total energy from incident wave and the energy flux due to backscattering from the particle can be also analyzed. With optical cross-section theorem, the forward scattering amplitude can be evaluated by extinction, scattering and absorption cross sections. The backward scattering amplitude can be evaluated by radar cross section. For the convenience of discussion, the dimensionless cross sections Q is introduced by the formula Q = σsc/σgeom, where σsc is the optical cross-section of the particle and σgeom = πa2 is the geometrical cross section with the radius a. By the scattering amplitudes ble and blm, the dimensionless extinction, scattering and backscattering cross section can be expressed as:
Qext=2k02a2l=1(2l+1)Re(ble+blm),Qsca=2k02a2l=1(2l+1)[|ble|2+|blm|2],Qrbs=1k0aRe|l=1(1)l(2l+1)(bleblm)|2.
(12)
With the extinction and scattering cross section, the dimensionless absorption cross section can be defined by the formula, Qabs = QextQsca. For discussing the light scattering due to surface plasmons, the scattering amplitudes in equ.(6)and(7) can be expressed in a more convenient form:
ble=Fbe(l)Fbe(l)+iGbe(l)andblm=Fbm(l)Fbm(l)+iGbm(l),
(13)
with,
Fbe=ɛtΦl(k0a)Φv1(kta)μtΦl(k0a)Φv1(kta),Gbe=ɛtχl(k0a)Φv1(kta)μtχl(k0a)Φv1(kta),Fbm=ɛtΦl(k0a)Φv2(kta)μtΦl(k0a)Φv2(kta),Gbm=ɛtχl(k0a)Φv2(kta)μtχl(k0a)Φv2(kta),
(14)
where χl(x)=πx2Nl+12(x).

3. Results and Discussion

The special properties of surface plasmon are expected to exist in the anisotropic materials. Since the electron collective movements are shown clearly in metal, let us consider firstly the strange effect in small isotropic metallic sphere. The relative dielectric permittivity in the Drude model is described as:
ɛD=1ωp2ω2+iγωwithωp=(ne2ɛ0m0)1/2,
(15)
where ωp, γ, n, e m0 and ε0 are the plasma frequency, frequency of electron collisions, concentration of electron, charge of electron, mass of electron and vacuum permittivity, respectively. Obviously, the value is complex, i.e. εD = Re[εD] + i Im[εD]. Here, ωp exhibits the properties of bulk plasmons. With the decrease of size, the new plasmon modes, surface plasmons will be possible to be excited. The nondimensional quantity q=aɛmk0, can be as size parameter to analyze the scattering effects with the radius of the spherical particle a and the dielectric permittivities of media εm. At small q, the electric dipole scattering plays the dominant role. the scattering from the magnetic amplitudes blm can be also neglected. Now we consider the case which is far from the resonances. The amplitude b1e of electric dipole can be approximately expressed as (2i/3)ɛD1ɛD+2q3. This results in classical extinction efficiency QscatR(83|ɛD1ɛD+2|2q4) of Rayleigh scattering. It should be noticed that the QscatR has a singularity at εD = −2. Therefore, with neglecting the frequency of electron collisions (γ = 0), it is obtained that the resonance frequency of dipole surface plasmon ωsp=ωp/3. By introducing normalized frequency ωR = ω/ωsp and normalized collision frequency γR = γ/ωsp, the Drude dielectric permittivity can be rewritten as:
ɛD=13ωR2+γR2+iγRωR3ωR2+γR2.
(16)
For the cases of weak dissipation (γR ∈ [10−1, 10−3]), the imaginary part of dielectric permittivity Im[ε] will be less than 0.3. In the process of deducing Rayleigh formula, the Fbe(l) in denominator part of ble is ignored, relative to Gbe(l). However, for the case which is near the resonances ( Gbe(l)0), the Fbe(l) will can not be ignored. Actually, Fbe(l) corresponds to the radiative damping as shown in Refs.[50

50. M. I. Tribelsky and B. S. Luk’yanchuk, “Anomalous light scattering by small particles,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 263902 (2006). [CrossRef]

, 51

51. B. S. Luk’yanchuk, M. I. Tribelsky, Z. B. Wang, Y. Zhou, M. H. Hong, L. P. Shi, and T. C. Chong, “Extraordinary scattering diagram for nanoparticles near plasmon resonance frequencies,” Appl. Phys. A 89, 259–264 (2007). [CrossRef]

]. With the consideration of radiative damping, the singularity of Rayleigh extinction efficiency will be disappeared. Meanwhile, a series of surface localized electromagnetic modes with the resonance frequencies ωR(l)(3l/(2l+1)) appear in the formula for small particle. This means the surface plasmons will be possible to be excited when the condition (Re[εD] < −1) is satisfied for the real part of dielectric permittivity Re[εD] of the particle.

Under the nondissipative limit (Im[εD] = 0), the resonance extinction cross section from small particle increases with increase in the order of the resonance modes, as shown in Ref[50

50. M. I. Tribelsky and B. S. Luk’yanchuk, “Anomalous light scattering by small particles,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 263902 (2006). [CrossRef]

]. However, in the real metal materials, the different dissipative mechanisms, such as the electron-electron collision, electron-phonon coupling and electron-defect interaction, will result in the damping of the collective moving of electrons with Im[εD] > 0. With the weak dissipative damping, the resonance frequencies are not changed obviously, whereas the extinction cross section of each resonance modes will decrease quickly. As shown in Fig. 1, the decrease of the cross sections of higher order modes is quicker than that of dipole resonance cross sections.

Fig. 1 The maximal value of Qext for each resonance mode as a function of the dissipative damping Im[εD] for the size q = 1 (A) and q = 0.5 (B). The Qext as a function of both frequency ω and Im[εD] for dipole and quadrupole modes of the particle with size q = 1 shown in the inset of (A).

For the particle size q ≤ 1 with Im[εD] ≥ 0.07 at each resonance frequency, the dipole resonance becomes greater than that of the higher order modes, such as quadruple. For an example, the dipole resonance of the particle with size q = 0.5 becomes the dominant resonance mode when the image part of permittivity εD is larger than 0.02. The quick decrease of cross section of high order resonance modes may be attributed to their relative small characteristic widths. As we known, the natural width of the arbitrary resonance is given by the following expression[50

50. M. I. Tribelsky and B. S. Luk’yanchuk, “Anomalous light scattering by small particles,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 263902 (2006). [CrossRef]

]:
γl=q2l+1(l+1)[l(2l1)!!]2(dɛD/dω)l
(17)
where the derivative (D/)l is taken at the corresponding resonance frequency ω = ωl. There is an extremely sharp decrease in γl with the increase of l. At the same time, the characteristic width γl will increase and the different resonance modes become to incorporate, following the increase of size q. As shown in the inset of Fig. 1A, the incorporation between dipole and quadruple resonances induces that the quadruple resonance still holds an important rule in scattering process even at Im[εD] = 0.3 for the size q = 1. Whatever, we can find that the dipole resonance mode should be considered to be as an important role for the application of surface plasmons.

Since the small size is more effective for the surface plasmons as found in Fig. 1A and B, we will detect the giant resonance cross section in the size rang 0 < q < 1 for the small metal sphere. As the result of Rayleigh formula, the dipole scattering section increases quickly following εD reaches asymptotically the singular value −2 (in Fig. 2A) under the nondissipative limit, while the size q arrives at the limit value 0 from Mie theory as shown in Fig. 4A. With the dissipative damping, the resonance frequency of the maximal resonance cross section will have a large change, though the resonance frequency is just with an inconspicuous change by following the increase of Im[εD] at fixed size q. As Fig. 2A shown, the maximal resonance frequency has a red-shift with the decrease of the maximal cross section as a function of Im[εD]. This means the maximal resonance scattering should be appeared on a particle with a limited small size and not on a particle with q → 0.

Fig. 2 The maximal value of Qext as a function of Re[εD] with different Im[εD] (A), the maximal or minimal values of Qsca and Qabs as a function of Im[εD] with Re[εD] = −2.2 (B), maximal value of Qext as a function of Im[εr] with different Re[εr] and the ratio εt/εr (C and D).
Fig. 4 Log[Qext] as a function of permittivity εD and size q under the nondissipative limit (Im[εD] = 0) (A), the maximal value of Log[Qext] as a function of Re[εD] and Im[εD] (B), the maximal value of Log[Qsca] as a function of Im[εr] and the ratio |εt|/|εr| for Re[εr] = −2.5 and εt = (−2.5 + i Im[εr])|εt|/|εr|(C), Log[Qsca] as a function of the ratio |εt|/|εr| and size q for εr = −2.5 −0.1i and εt = (−2.5 −0.1i)|εt|/|εr|(D).

Near plasmon resonance frequencies, the anisotropy of permittivity can lead to an additional increase in field enhancement has been shown. In Fig. 3A, the maximal scattering section Qmax ext as a function of both εr and εt/εr is demonstrated under the nondissipative limit (Im[εr] = 0 and Im[εt] = 0). It can be found that the maximal value of Qmax ext will exist at the relative small ratio of εt to εr with the decrease of εr. Since the scattering efficiencies are inversely proportional to q2, the change of Qmax ext following the change of the ratio εt/εr may be due to the shift in the resonance positions. As Fig. 3B shown, the maximal value of Qext is at the small size q with the decrease of the ratio εt/εr. Furthermore, the Qext also increases with the decease of q and increase of εr at fixed ratio εt/εr = 0.75 shown in Fig. 3C. Therefore, the enhancement of resonance scattering efficiencies can be attributed mostly to the decrease of the size q.

Fig. 3 Log[Qmax ext] as a function of both εr and εt/εr (A), Qext as a function of q and εt/εr with fixed longitudinal permittivity εr = −2.5 (B) and Qext as a function of q and εr with fixed ratio εt/εr = 0.75 (C), with the nondissipative limit (Im[εr] = 0 and Im[εt] = 0).

As we shown, the resonance scatting section decreases quickly with the enhancement of the dissipative damping. If an assumed active mechanism with the negative value for Im[εD] is introduced, whether the scattering efficiency can increase need to be checked further. In Fig. 2B, the resonance cross sections of scattering (Qmax sca) and absorption (Qmin abs or Qmax abs) as the functions of Im[εD] with the fixed Re[εD] (= −2.2) are analyzed. we find that Qmax sca has a maximal value at the point with Im[εD] = −0.05. At the same time, there is a minimal value for Qmin abs. It is well known that the absorption is attributed to the dissipative damping. With the decrease of Im[εD], the efficiency of absorption decreases, whereas the resonance scattering cross section increases. Thus, there is a maximal value for Qabs at special point of Im[εD]. At the limit of small size parameter, the maximal value of Qabs is given by Qabsmaxl=1q2(l+1/2) [52

52. M. I. Tribelsky, “Anomalous light absorption by small particles,” arXiv:0912.3644v1.

]. Then at the nondissipative limit, the absorbtion cross section (Qabs) will become zero. The negative Qsca at the negative Im[εD] means the particle can emit light with some active mechanism. Therefore, the minimal value of Qmin abs at Im[εD] = −0.05 means there is light emitting with special resonance mechanism. In Fig. 4B, the Qmax sca as the function of both Re[εD] and Im[εD] is shown. It is found that the maximal resonance scattering cross section exists with the more negative value of Im[εD] for the smaller Re[εD]. In Fig. 2 C, D and Fig. 4 C, we demonstrate that the anisotropy of permittivity with different negative image part may result in the more large resonance cross sections of scattering and emitting. In Fig. 4D, we found that the giant resonance cross section is located at the region of special particle size.

In practice, the active metal is impossible to exist, since the overlap of valance band and conduction band at the Fermi level will result in an impotent radiation transition for any visible light and the energy gain from the model of absorbtion-emission can not be realized. However, if the dielectric or insulate, such as silica, is introduced in the system, the light absorbtion-emission model can be used to be as the mechanism of energy gain. Therefore, the active mechanism can be introduced by the anisotropic permittivity with εr or εt for the active medium. Then it is expected that the light gain can be coupled with the collective moving of electrons from metal. The giant resonance cross section for light scattering and adsorption (or emission) will be possible to be obtained.

For the metal particle, the giant scattering resonance cross section due to the surface plasmons is localized at the small size with q < 1. For dielectric particle, there isn’t the ability to trap the electromagnetic field which results in the scattering cross section is small in the nano size for visible light. Since the surface plasmons mechanism is more effective for small size, we will limit the size of the anisotropic spherical particle in the region of 0 < q ≤ 2. As Fig. 5A shown, the maximal value of Qsca is as a function of Re[εt] and Im[εt] with fixed longitudinal permittivity εr = 2.5 – 0.05i. We can found that there is a region with Re[εt] ∼ −1.8 for giant scattering cross section duo to the resonance. It is known that the resonance from the electric dipole mode needs ε ≤ −2 for metal particle. Therefore, it is possible that there is a relation for both εr and εt in the region of resonance. It is also found that Im[εt] is less than 0.05 for the region of resonance. It seems that the energy gain from the active dielectric part (εr) must be larger than the dissipative damping from the metal part (εt) for the giant resonance cross section.

Fig. 5 the resonance cross section Log[Qsca] as a function of transverse permittivity (Re[εt] and Re[εt]) with the fixed longitudinal permittivity εr = 2.5 – 0.05i (A), the maximal value of scattering amplitude | b1e| as a function of Re[εt] and Im[εt] with the fixed εr = 2.5 – 0.05i (B).

Is it possible that the giant resonance cross section is from the contribution of different scattering modes? After the analysis of scattering cross section, it is found that the electronic dipole mode is the major contribution for the special anisotropic particle with the size 0 < q ≤ 2. In Fig. 5B, the absolute value of the scattering amplitude b1e from electric dipole mode as a function of Re[εt] and Im[εt] with fixed longitudinal permittivity εr = 2.5 – 0.05i is shown. It demonstrates the major contribution of electronic dipole mode. Therefore, it is considered that the electronic dipole mode will be possible to be the effective major mode to couple with the active medium for the particle with size 0 < q ≤ 2. Firstly, the longitudinal permittivity εr as the active medium is considered to be contributed to the the giant scattering cross section. In Fig. 6A, | b1maxe| as a function of Re[εr] and Re[εt] with fixed image parts Im[εr] = 0.05 and Im[εt] = −0.008 is shown. Obviously, there is a quasi-linear region for the resonance cross section. By fitting the extremum of | b1maxe| about Re[εr] and Re[εt], we find there is a quasi-linear relation (Re[εt] = − 2.62 + 0.608Re[εr] − 0.110Re[εr]2 + 0.008Re[εr]3) for resonance region. Secondly, the transverse permittivity εt is considered to be as the active medium for the giant scattering cross section. In Fig. 6B, | b1maxe| as a function of Re[εr] and Re[εt] with fixed image parts Im[εr] = 0.001 and Im[εt] = −0.02 is shown. It is found that there is also a linear relation about Re[εr] and Re[εt] for the resonance region. By fitting the value of | b1maxe|, the linear relation, Re[εt] = 0.389 – 0.154Re[εr], is found.

Fig. 6 the maximal value of scattering amplitude | b1e| as a function of Re[εr] and Re[εt] with fixed Im[εr](= −0.05) and Im[εt](= 0.008) for εr as active medium (A), with fixed Im[εr](= 0.001) and Im[εt](= −0.02) for εt as active medium (B).

With the relation about the real parts of both εr and εt, we can detect the dependence of the size about the resonance cross section in the resonance region in detail. From Fig. 7A and B, it is found that the size for resonance cross section changes with the real part of permittivity. Furthermore, by the relation of Re[εr] and Re[εt], the size is more dependent to the permittivity with the dielectric property. Then we can explore the dependence of resonance cross section to the dissipative damping from metal and the gain energy of active dielectric. Considering the weak dissipative limit, we just analyze the Im[εt] or Im[εr] in the region [0, 0.3] for the damping. As shown in Fig. 7C and D, there is the special relation bewteen Im[εt] and Im[εr] for the resonance process. It gives us an amazed conclusion that it is not the case that larger energy gain results in a stronger coupling to surface plasomons and then a larger resonance cross section. In additional, with the special ratio of Im[εt] and Im[εr], there are the giant resonance cross sections, such as for backscattering shown in Fig. 8. The giant cross sections should be attributed to the the resonance of electric dipole mode with the assistance of gain energy from the active εr or εt and this maybe result in spaser.

Fig. 7 the scattering amplitude Log[|b1e|] as a function of Re[εr] and q with fixed Im[εr](= −0.05) and Im[εt](= 0.008) (Re[εt] is chosen by the formula Re[εt] = −2.62 + 0.608Re[εr] − 0.110Re[εr]2 + 0.008Re[εr]3)(A), the scattering amplitude Log[|b1e|] as a function of Re[εr] and q with fixed Im[εr](= 0.001) and Im[εt](= −0.02) (Re[εt] is chosen by the formula Re[εt] = 0.389 – 0.154Re[εr])(B), the maximal value of scattering amplitude Log[|b1e|] as a function of f(Im[εr]) and Im[εt] with εr = 3 – f(Im[εt])Im[εt] i and Re[εt] = −1.5604 (C) and the maximal value of scattering amplitude Log[|b1e|] as a function of f(Im[εr]) and Im[εr] with Re[εr] = −12 and εt = 2.237 – f(Im[εr])Im[εr]i (D).
Fig. 8 High scattering efficiencies with huge radar backscattering cross section. Qrbs as the function of size q for εr with the property of energy-gain (A and B) and for εt with the property of energy-gain (C and D).

4. Conclusion

With the expanded Mie theory, the Maxwell’s equations are solved by the Debye’s scalar potentials and the electromagnetic fields are expressed in terms of Bessel functions with Legendre functions. Thus, the light scattering of spherical structure with anisotropic permittivity can be analyzed effectively. For metal particle, small dissipative damping will result in the rapid decrease of resonance scattering cross section. Furthermore, the resonance cross section of higher order scattering mode deceases more quickly than that of dipole mode. This explains that why the electric dipole approximation is an effective method for small metal particle, and it also implies that the dipole mode may be an effective way to control light energy into nanometer scale.

With designing the transverse permittivity εt and the longitudinal permittivity εr, we can introduce an active mechanism to compensate the damping dissipation of plasmons and even enhance the resonance of plasmons. With the analysis of extinction, scattering, absorption and radar cross section, the electric anisotropy effects on scattering efficiency are studied systematically for small partial. Following the change of the transverse permittivity εt, the longitudinal permittivity εr and the particle size q, the huge scattering cross sections are found at the regions with special parameters. The huge cross sections are considered to be due to the coupling between the surface plasmon with electric dipole mode and the active medium. This coupling results in the strong light emitting and scattering.

References and links

1.

M. L. Brongersma and P. G. Kik, Surface plasmon nanophotonics (Springer Series in Optical Sciences, Springer, 2007), Vol. 131. [CrossRef]

2.

S. A. Maier, Plasmonics: fundamentals and applications (Springer, 2007).

3.

B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater. 9, 707–715 (2010). [CrossRef]

4.

P. Muhlschlegel, H.-J. Eisler, O. J. F. Martin, B. Hecht, and D. W. Pohl, “Resonant optical antennas,” Science 308, 1607–1608 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

J. A. Gordon and R. W. Ziolkowski, “The design and simulated performance of a coated nano-particle laser,” Opt. Express 15, 2622–2653 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

6.

S. Noda, “Seeking the ultimate nanolaser,” Science 314, 260–261 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

M. T. Hill, “Lasing in metallic-coated nanocavities,” Nature Photon. 1, 589–594 (2007). [CrossRef]

8.

C. Genet and T. W. Ebbesen, “Light in tiny holes,” Nature 445, 39–46 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

B. Liedberg, C. Nylander, and I. Lundstrom, “Surface plasmon resonance for gas detection and biosensing,” Sens. Actuators 4, 299–304 (1983). [CrossRef]

10.

C. A. Mirkin, R. L. Letsinger, R. C. Mucic, and J.J. Storhoff, “A DNA-based method for rationally assembling nanoparticles into macroscopic materials,” Nature 382, 607–609 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

11.

A. J. Haes, L. Chang, W. L. Klein, and R. P. Van Duyne, “Detection of a biomarker for alzheimer’s disease from synthetic and clinical samples using a nanoscale optical biosensor,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2264–2271(2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

12.

T. Rindzevicius, Y. Alaverdyan, A. Dahlin, F. Hook, D. S. Sutherland, and M. Kall, “Plasmonic sensing characteristics of single nanometric holes,” Nano Lett. 5, 2335–2339 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

S. Nie and S. R. Emony, “Probing single molecules and single nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman scattering,” Science 275, 1102–1106 (1997). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

14.

J. P. Kottmann and O. J. F. Martin, “Plasmon resonant coupling in metallic nanowires,” Opt. Express 8, 655–663 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

15.

P. Bharadwaj, P. Anger, and L. Novotny, “Nanoplasmonic enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence,” Nanotechnology 18, 044017 (2007). [CrossRef]

16.

Y. Fu, J. Zhang, and J.R. Lakowicz, “Plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from single fluorophores end-linked to gold nanorods,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 5540–5541 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

17.

P. Andrew and W. L. Barnes, “Energy transfer across a metal film mediated by surface plasmon polaritons,” Science 306, 1002–1005 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

P. Andrew and W.L. Barnes, “Förster energy transfer in an optical microcavity,” Science 290, 785–788 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

E. Prodan, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, and P. Nordlander, “A hybridization model for the plasmon response of complex nanostructures,” Science 302419–422, (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

H. Liu and P. Lalanne, “Microscopic theory of the extraordinary optical transmission,” Nature 452, 728–731 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

21.

R. F. Oulton, V. J. Sorger, D. A. Genov, D. F. P. Pile, and X. Zhang, “A hybrid plasmonic waveguide for sub-wavelength confinement and long-range propagation,” Nat. Photonics 2, 496–500 (2008) [CrossRef]

22.

M. Nezhad, K. Tetz, and Y. Fainman, “Gain assisted propagation of surface plasmon polaritons on planar metallic waveguides,” Opt. Express 12, 4072–4079 (2004) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

23.

N. M. Lawandy, “Localized surface plasmon singularities in amplifying media,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 5040–5042 (2004). [CrossRef]

24.

M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, M. Bahoura, J. Adegoke, C. E. Small, B. A. Ritzo, V. P. Drachev, and V. M. Shalaev, “Enhancement of surface plasmons in an Ag aggregate by optical gain in a dielectric medium,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3022–3024 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

25.

J. Seidel, S. Grafstroum, and L. Eng, “Stimulated emission of surface plasmons at the interface between a silver film and an optically pumped dye solution,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 177401 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

M. A. Noginov, V. A. Podolskiy, G. Zhu, M. Mayy, M. Bahoura, J. A. Adegoke, B. A. Ritzo, and K. Reynolds, “Compensation of loss in propagating surface plasmon polariton by gain in adjacent dielectric medium,” Opt. Express 16, 1385–1392 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

27.

D. J. Bergman and M. I. Stockman, “Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation: quantum generation of coherent surface plasmons in nanosystems,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 027402 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

28.

M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, A. M. Belgrave, R. Bakker, V. M. Shalaev, E. E. Narimanov, S. Stout, E. Herz, T. Suteewong, and U. Wiesner, “Demonstration of a spaser-based nanolaser,” Nature 460, 1110–1112 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

29.

M.I. Stockman, “Spasers explained,” Nat. Photonics 2, 327–329 (2008). [CrossRef]

30.

J. B. Pendry, “Negative refraction makes a perfect lens,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3966–3969 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

31.

E. Prodan and P. Nordlander, “Plasmon hybridization in spherical nanoparticles,” J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5444–5454 (2004) [CrossRef] [PubMed]

32.

R. D. Graglia, P. L. E. Uslenghi, and R. S. Zich, “Moment method with isoparametric elements for three-dimensional anisotropic scatterers,” Proc. IEEE 77, 750–760 (1989). [CrossRef]

33.

J. I. Dadap, J. Shan, K. B. Eisenthal, and T. F. Heinz, “Second-Harmonic Rayleigh scattering from a sphere of centrosymmetric material,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4045–4048 (1999). [CrossRef]

34.

V. V. Varadan, A. Lakhtakia, and V. K. Varadan, “Scattering by three-dimensional anisotropic scatterers,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 37, 800–802 (1989). [CrossRef]

35.

Y. L. Geng, X. B. Wu, L. W. Li, and B. R. Guan, “Mie scattering by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere,” Phys. Rev. E 70, 056609 (2004). [CrossRef]

36.

B. Stout, M. Neviere, and E. Popov, “Mie scattering by an anisotropic object. Part I: Homogeneous sphere,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 1111–1123 (2006). [CrossRef]

37.

B. Stout, M. Neviere, and E. Popov, “Mie scattering by an anisotropic object. Part II: Arbitrary-shaped object differential theory,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 1124–1134 (2006). [CrossRef]

38.

C.-W. Qiu, L. W. Li, T.-S. Yeo, and S. Zouhdi, “Scattering by rotationally symmetric anisotropic spheres: Potential formulation and parametric studies,” Phys. Rev. E 75, 026609 (2007). [CrossRef]

39.

B. S. Luk’yanchuk and C.-W. Qiu, “Enhanced scattering efficiencies in spherical particles with weakly dissipating anisotropic materials,” Appl. Phys. A 92,773 (2008) [CrossRef]

40.

M. Born and E. Wolf, Principles of optics, 7th ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999).

41.

Edward J. Rothwell and Michael J. Cloud, Electromagnetics, 2nd ed. (CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2009).

42.

W. C. Chew, Waves and fields in inhomogeneous media (Van Nostrand, New York, 1990).

43.

W. Ren, “Contributions to the electromagnetic wave theory of bounded homogeneous anisotropic media,” Phys. Rev. E 47, 664–673 (1993). [CrossRef]

44.

C. T. Tai, Dyadic Green’s functions in electromagnetic theory, 2nd ed. (IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, 1994). [PubMed]

45.

A. L. Aden and M. Kerker, “Scattering of electromagnetic waves from two concentric spheres,” J. Appl. Phys. 22, 12421246 (1951). [CrossRef]

46.

Z. S. Wu and Y. P. Wang, “Electromagnetic scattering for multilayered sphere: Recursive algorithms,” Radio Sci. 26, 13931401(1991). [CrossRef]

47.

R. J. Tarento, K. H. Bennemann, P. Joyes, and J. Van de Walle, “Mie scattering of magnetic spheres,” Phys. Rev. E 69, 026606 (2004). [CrossRef]

48.

P. W. Barber and S. C. Hill, Light scattering by particles: computational methods (World Scientific, Singapore, 1990). [CrossRef]

49.

C. F. Bohren and D. R. Huffman, Absorption and scattering of light by small particles (Wiley, New York, 1983).

50.

M. I. Tribelsky and B. S. Luk’yanchuk, “Anomalous light scattering by small particles,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 263902 (2006). [CrossRef]

51.

B. S. Luk’yanchuk, M. I. Tribelsky, Z. B. Wang, Y. Zhou, M. H. Hong, L. P. Shi, and T. C. Chong, “Extraordinary scattering diagram for nanoparticles near plasmon resonance frequencies,” Appl. Phys. A 89, 259–264 (2007). [CrossRef]

52.

M. I. Tribelsky, “Anomalous light absorption by small particles,” arXiv:0912.3644v1.

OCIS Codes
(140.3380) Lasers and laser optics : Laser materials
(240.6680) Optics at surfaces : Surface plasmons
(260.3910) Physical optics : Metal optics
(290.4020) Scattering : Mie theory

ToC Category:
Scattering

History
Original Manuscript: October 4, 2010
Revised Manuscript: October 28, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: October 28, 2010
Published: November 12, 2010

Citation
Xiaofeng Fan, Zexiang Shen, and Boris Luk'yanchuk, "Huge light scattering from active anisotropic spherical particles," Opt. Express 18, 24868-24880 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-24-24868


Sort:  Author  |  Year  |  Journal  |  Reset  

References

  1. M. L. Brongersma, and P. G. Kik, Surface plasmon nanophotonics (Springer Series in Optical Sciences, Springer, 2007), Vol. 131. [CrossRef]
  2. S. A. Maier, Plasmonics: fundamentals and applications (Springer, 2007).
  3. B. Luk’yanchuk, N. I. Zheludev, S. A. Maier, N. J. Halas, P. Nordlander, H. Giessen, and C. T. Chong, “The Fano resonance in plasmonic nanostructures and metamaterials,” Nat. Mater. 9, 707–715 (2010). [CrossRef]
  4. P. Muhlschlegel, H.-J. Eisler, O. J. F. Martin, B. Hecht, and D. W. Pohl, “Resonant optical antennas,” Science 308, 1607–1608 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. J. A. Gordon, and R. W. Ziolkowski, “The design and simulated performance of a coated nano-particle laser,” Opt. Express 15, 2622–2653 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  6. S. Noda, “Seeking the ultimate nanolaser,” Science 314, 260–261 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. M. T. Hill,  et al., “Lasing in metallic-coated nanocavities,” Nat. Photonics 1, 589–594 (2007). [CrossRef]
  8. C. Genet, and T. W. Ebbesen, “Light in tiny holes,” Nature 445, 39–46 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. B. Liedberg, C. Nylander, and I. Lundstrom, “Surface plasmon resonance for gas detection and biosensing,” Sens. Actuators 4, 299–304 (1983). [CrossRef]
  10. C. A. Mirkin, R. L. Letsinger, R. C. Mucic, and J. J. Storhoff, “A DNA-based method for rationally assembling nanoparticles into macroscopic materials,” Nature 382, 607–609 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  11. A. J. Haes, L. Chang, W. L. Klein, and R. P. Van Duyne, “Detection of a biomarker for alzheimer’s disease from synthetic and clinical samples using a nanoscale optical biosensor,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127, 2264–2271 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  12. T. Rindzevicius, Y. Alaverdyan, A. Dahlin, F. Hook, D. S. Sutherland, and M. Kall, “Plasmonic sensing characteristics of single nanometric holes,” Nano Lett. 5, 2335–2339 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. S. Nie, and S. R. Emony, “Probing single molecules and single nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman scattering,” Science 275, 1102–1106 (1997). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  14. J. P. Kottmann, and O. J. F. Martin, “Plasmon resonant coupling in metallic nanowires,” Opt. Express 8, 655–663 (2001). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  15. P. Bharadwaj, P. Anger, and L. Novotny, “Nanoplasmonic enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence,” Nanotechnology 18, 044017 (2007). [CrossRef]
  16. Y. Fu, J. Zhang, and J. R. Lakowicz, “Plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from single fluorophores end-linked to gold nanorods,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 5540–5541 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  17. P. Andrew, and W. L. Barnes, “Energy transfer across a metal film mediated by surface plasmon polaritons,” Science 306, 1002–1005 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. P. Andrew, and W. L. Barnes, “F¨orster energy transfer in an optical microcavity,” Science 290, 785–788 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  19. E. Prodan, C. Radloff, N. J. Halas, and P. Nordlander, “A hybridization model for the plasmon response of complex nanostructures,” Science 302, 419–422 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. H. Liu, and P. Lalanne, “Microscopic theory of the extraordinary optical transmission,” Nature 452, 728–731 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  21. R. F. Oulton, V. J. Sorger, D. A. Genov, D. F. P. Pile, and X. Zhang, “A hybrid plasmonic waveguide for subwavelength confinement and long-range propagation,” Nat. Photonics 2, 496–500 (2008). [CrossRef]
  22. M. Nezhad, K. Tetz, and Y. Fainman, “Gain assisted propagation of surface plasmon polaritons on planar metallic waveguides,” Opt. Express 12, 4072–4079 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  23. N. M. Lawandy, “Localized surface plasmon singularities in amplifying media,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 85, 5040–5042 (2004). [CrossRef]
  24. M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, M. Bahoura, J. Adegoke, C. E. Small, B. A. Ritzo, V. P. Drachev, and V. M. Shalaev, “Enhancement of surface plasmons in an Ag aggregate by optical gain in a dielectric medium,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3022–3024 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  25. J. Seidel, S. Grafstroum, and L. Eng, “Stimulated emission of surface plasmons at the interface between a silver film and an optically pumped dye solution,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 177401 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  26. M. A. Noginov, V. A. Podolskiy, G. Zhu, M. Mayy, M. Bahoura, J. A. Adegoke, B. A. Ritzo, and K. Reynolds, “Compensation of loss in propagating surface plasmon polariton by gain in adjacent dielectric medium,” Opt. Express 16, 1385–1392 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  27. D. J. Bergman, and M. I. Stockman, “Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation: quantum generation of coherent surface plasmons in nanosystems,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 027402 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  28. M. A. Noginov, G. Zhu, A. M. Belgrave, R. Bakker, V. M. Shalaev, E. E. Narimanov, S. Stout, E. Herz, T. Suteewong, and U. Wiesner, “Demonstration of a spaser-based nanolaser,” Nature 460, 1110–1112 (2009). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  29. M. I. Stockman, “Spasers explained,” Nat. Photonics 2, 327–329 (2008). [CrossRef]
  30. J. B. Pendry, “Negative refraction makes a perfect lens,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3966–3969 (2000). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  31. E. Prodan, and P. Nordlander, “Plasmon hybridization in spherical nanoparticles,” J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5444–5454 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  32. R. D. Graglia, P. L. E. Uslenghi, and R. S. Zich, “Moment method with isoparametric elements for threedimensional anisotropic scatterers,” Proc. IEEE 77, 750–760 (1989). [CrossRef]
  33. J. I. Dadap, J. Shan, K. B. Eisenthal, and T. F. Heinz, “Second-Harmonic Rayleigh scattering from a sphere of centrosymmetric material,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4045–4048 (1999). [CrossRef]
  34. V. V. Varadan, A. Lakhtakia, and V. K. Varadan, “Scattering by three-dimensional anisotropic scatterers,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 37, 800–802 (1989). [CrossRef]
  35. Y. L. Geng, X. B. Wu, L. W. Li, and B. R. Guan, “Mie scattering by a uniaxial anisotropic sphere,” Phys. Rev. E Stat. Nonlin. Soft Matter Phys. 70, 056609 (2004). [CrossRef]
  36. B. Stout, M. Neviere, and E. Popov, “Mie scattering by an anisotropic object. Part I: Homogeneous sphere,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 1111–1123 (2006). [CrossRef]
  37. B. Stout, M. Neviere, and E. Popov, “Mie scattering by an anisotropic object. Part II: Arbitrary-shaped object differential theory,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 23, 1124–1134 (2006). [CrossRef]
  38. C.-W. Qiu, L. W. Li, T.-S. Yeo, and S. Zouhdi, “Scattering by rotationally symmetric anisotropic spheres: Potential formulation and parametric studies,” Phys. Rev. E Stat. Nonlin. Soft Matter Phys. 75, 026609 (2007). [CrossRef]
  39. B. S. Luk’yanchuk, and C.-W. Qiu, “Enhanced scattering efficiencies in spherical particles with weakly dissipating anisotropic materials,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process. 92, 773 (2008). [CrossRef]
  40. M. Born, and E. Wolf, Principles of optics, 7th ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1999).
  41. E. J. Rothwell, and M. J. Cloud, Electromagnetics, 2nd ed. (CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, 2009).
  42. W. C. Chew, Waves and fields in inhomogeneous media (Van Nostrand, New York, 1990).
  43. W. Ren, “Contributions to the electromagnetic wave theory of bounded homogeneous anisotropic media,” Phys. Rev. E Stat. Phys. Plasmas Fluids Relat. Interdiscip. Topics 47, 664–673 (1993). [CrossRef]
  44. C. T. Tai, Dyadic Green’s functions in electromagnetic theory, 2nd ed.(IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, 1994). [PubMed]
  45. A. L. Aden, and M. Kerker, “Scattering of electromagnetic waves from two concentric spheres,” J. Appl. Phys. 22, 12421246 (1951). [CrossRef]
  46. Z. S. Wu, and Y. P. Wang, “Electromagnetic scattering for multilayered sphere: Recursive algorithms,” Radio Sci. 26, 13931401 (1991). [CrossRef]
  47. R. J. Tarento, K. H. Bennemann, P. Joyes, and J. Van de Walle, “Mie scattering of magnetic spheres,” Phys. Rev. E Stat. Nonlin. Soft Matter Phys. 69, 026606 (2004). [CrossRef]
  48. P. W. Barber, and S. C. Hill, Light scattering by particles: computational methods (World Scientific, Singapore, 1990). [CrossRef]
  49. C. F. Bohren, and D. R. Huffman, Absorption and scattering of light by small particles (Wiley, New York, 1983).
  50. M. I. Tribelsky, and B. S. Luk’yanchuk, “Anomalous light scattering by small particles,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 263902 (2006). [CrossRef]
  51. B. S. Luk’yanchuk, M. I. Tribelsky, Z. B. Wang, Y. Zhou, M. H. Hong, L. P. Shi, and T. C. Chong, “Extraordinary scattering diagram for nanoparticles near plasmon resonance frequencies,” Appl. Phys., A Mater. Sci. Process. 89, 259–264 (2007). [CrossRef]
  52. M. I. Tribelsky, “Anomalous light absorption by small particles,” arXiv:0912.3644v1.

Cited By

Alert me when this paper is cited

OSA is able to provide readers links to articles that cite this paper by participating in CrossRef's Cited-By Linking service. CrossRef includes content from more than 3000 publishers and societies. In addition to listing OSA journal articles that cite this paper, citing articles from other participating publishers will also be listed.


« Previous Article  |  Next Article »

OSA is a member of CrossRef.

CrossCheck Deposited