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Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 25 — Dec. 6, 2010
  • pp: 25833–25838
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Interplay of four-wave mixing processes with a mixed coherent-incoherent pump

Jochen Schröder, Anne Boucon, Stéphane Coen, and Thibaut Sylvestre  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 25, pp. 25833-25838 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.025833


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Abstract

We experimentally demonstrate the existence of multiple, simultaneous, independent four-wave mixing processes in optical fibers. In particular we observe competition between phase-matched and non-phase-matched processes involving the same mixed coherent-incoherent pump. Further investigation reveals that narrow-band degenerate four-wave mixing with an incoherent pump can lead to efficient wavelength conversion.

© 2010 Optical Society of America

1. Introduction

The nonlinear phenomena of four-wave mixing (FWM) and parametric interactions in optical fibers have attracted considerable research interest for several decades. Investigations started as early as 1974 when Stolen et al first observed FWM in a glass fiber [1

1. R. H. Stolen, J. E. Bjorkholm, and A. Ashkin, “Phase-matched three-wave mixing in silica fiber optical waveguides,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 24, 308–310 (1974). [CrossRef]

], initially referring to it as three-wave mixing. The efficiency of FWM in generating waves at new optical frequencies has then led to an enormous amount of research [2

2. A. C. Sodre, J. M. C. Boggio, A. A. Rieznik, H. E. Hernandez-Figueroa, H. L. Fragnito, and J. C. Knight, “Highly efficient generation of broadband cascaded four-wave mixing products,” Opt. Express 16, 2816–2828 (2008). [CrossRef]

9

9. R. Stolen and J. Bjorkholm, “Parametric amplification and frequency conversion in optical fibers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 18, 1062–1072 (1982). [CrossRef]

]. Today, FWM is the underlying process of a large number of applications ranging from parametric amplification [9

9. R. Stolen and J. Bjorkholm, “Parametric amplification and frequency conversion in optical fibers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 18, 1062–1072 (1982). [CrossRef]

, 10

10. J. Hansryd, P. Andrekson, M. Westlund, J. Li, and P.-O. Hedekvist, “Fiber-based optical parametric amplifiers and their applications,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 8, 506–520 (2002). [CrossRef]

] to wavelength conversion [11

11. M. Islam and O. Boyraz, “Fiber parametric amplifiers for wavelength band conversion,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 8, 527–537 (2002). [CrossRef]

, 12

12. M. E. Marhic, Y. Park, F. S. Yang, and L. G. Kazovsky, “Broadband fiber-optical parametric amplifiers and wavelength converters with low-ripple Chebyshev gain spectra,” Opt. Lett. 21, 1354 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] or high repetition rate pulsed light sources [13

13. S. Coen and M. Haelterman, “Continuous-wave ultrahigh-repetition-rate pulse-train generation through modulational instability in a passive fiber cavity,” Opt. Lett. 26, 39–41 (2001). [CrossRef]

15

15. J. Schröder, S. Coen, F. Vanholsbeeck, and T. Sylvestre, “Passively mode-locked Raman fiber laser with 100 GHz repetition rate,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3489–3491 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

Here we focus on two lesser known aspects of FWM, namely the interplay of multiple FWM processes and FWM based on an incoherent pump. Early theoretical and experimental studies considered only one FWM process at a time [5

5. G. Cappellini and S. Trillo, “Third-order three-wave mixing in single-mode fibers: exact solutions and spatial instability effects,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 824–838 (1991). [CrossRef]

,8

8. Y. Chen and A. W. Snyder, “Four-photon parametric mixing in optical fibers: effect of pump depletion,” Opt. Lett. 14, 87–89 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

,16

16. R. K. Jain and K. Stenersen, “Phase-matched four-photon mixing processes in birefringent fibers,” Appl. Phys. B 35, 49–57 (1984). [CrossRef]

]. In 1991, however, Thompson et al demonstrated FWM with two pump waves, which leads to a cascaded generation of sidebands [17

17. J. R. Thompson and R. Roy, “Multiple four-wave mixing process in an optical fiber,” Opt. Lett. 16, 557–559 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], and theoretically described the interplay between the multiple FWM processes involved [18

18. J. R. Thompson and R. Roy, “Nonlinear dynamics of multiple four-wave mixing processes in a single-mode fiber,” Phys. Rev. A 43, 4987–4996 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. Since then, several authors have expanded these results, predicting instabilities such as sideband oscillations along the fiber propagation [3

3. D. L. Hart, A. F. Judy, R. Roy, and J. W. Beletic, “Dynamical evolution of multiple four-wave-mixing processes in an optical fiber,” Phys. Rev. E 57, 4757–4774 (1998). [CrossRef]

, 19

19. S. Trillo, S. Wabnitz, and T. A. B. Kennedy, “Nonlinear dynamics of dual-frequency-pumped multiwave mixing in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 50, 1732–1747 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] as well as a self-stabilization effect [20

20. X. Liu, X. Zhou, and C. Lu, “Multiple four-wave mixing self-stability in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 72, 013811 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. The concept of two pump FWM was also recently expanded to very broadband cascaded FWM products [2

2. A. C. Sodre, J. M. C. Boggio, A. A. Rieznik, H. E. Hernandez-Figueroa, H. L. Fragnito, and J. C. Knight, “Highly efficient generation of broadband cascaded four-wave mixing products,” Opt. Express 16, 2816–2828 (2008). [CrossRef]

, 21

21. C. J. McKinstrie and M. G. Raymer, “Four-wave-mixing cascades near the zero-dispersion frequency,” Opt. Express 14, 9600–9610 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. In contrast to the cascaded generation of FWM sidebands, we demonstrate the simultaneous occurrence of largely independent FWM processes. Two processes stand out in particular: a non-phase-matched interaction between three wavelengths and the wavelength conversion of a signal with a broadband incoherent pump beam comprised of an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source.

2. Experiment

The experimental setup is depicted in Fig. 1. It is based on a continuous-wave (cw) Raman fiber laser (RFL) with a fixed wavelength of 1455 nm and a cw Erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL), wavelength tunable between 1535 and 1565 nm. The EDFL is followed by an Erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) generating up to 33 dBm of output power, including some amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. The ASE noise appears around 1550 nm with a spectral width of approximately 50 nm (at −10 dB level). The two light sources are combined into 3.1 km of dispersion-shifted fiber (DSF) by a wavelength division multiplexer (WDM). The fiber has a nonlinear parameter γ = 2 W−1 km−1, a zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of 1550 nm (right within the tuning range of the EDFL and the bandwidth of the ASE), and dispersion coefficients β2 = −0.473 ps2/km, β3 = 0.119 ps3/km, β4 = −5.66 × 10−4 ps4/km (at 1555 nm). The output spectrum is recorded using an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA).

Fig. 1 Experimental setup. RFL: Raman fiber laser, EDFL and EDFA: Erbium-doped fiber laser and amplifier, WDM: wavelength division multiplexer, DSF: dispersion shifted fiber, OSA: optical spectrum analyzer.

Figure 2 depicts the spectra at the output of the DSF when scanning the EDFL wavelength from 1536 to 1554 nm, both as (a) a line and (b) a color plot. Here the power of the RFL was set to 1.3 W and the EDFA was adjusted to yield approximately 500 mW of output power. The spectra reveal a number of new frequency components created by independent FWM processes. The individual processes are easily distinguishable and this is to the best of our knowledge the first observation of such a large number of independent, simultaneous FWM processes. In the following we will discuss each of these in more details.

Fig. 2 Output spectra for EDFL wavelengths 1536 to 1554 nm: (a) line plot, (b) color plot.

For long EDFL wavelengths, the most obvious feature in the spectra are the two sidebands created by the spontaneous scalar modulation instability (MI) of the EDFL. These sidebands are symmetrically located around the EDFL frequency. The lower and upper limits delineating the frequency region of positive MI gain are given by the two inequalities [30

30. J. D. Harvey, R. Leonhardt, S. Coen, G. K. L. Wong, J. C. Knight, W. J. Wadsworth, and P. St. J. Russell, “Scalar modulation instability in the normal dispersion regime by use of a photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 28, 2225–2227 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]:
β2+β4Ω2/12<0
(1)
|β2+β4Ω2/12|Ω2<4γP
(2)
where Ω is the angular frequency detuning of the sidebands from the pump wave (here the EDFL). The frequency region defined by these inequalities is very narrow for large normal dispersion while it gets significantly wider around the ZDW [30

30. J. D. Harvey, R. Leonhardt, S. Coen, G. K. L. Wong, J. C. Knight, W. J. Wadsworth, and P. St. J. Russell, “Scalar modulation instability in the normal dispersion regime by use of a photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 28, 2225–2227 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

]. This is well reproduced in our experiment, as highlighted by Fig. 3 that shows an enlargement of the relevant part of the spectra of Fig. 2, again both as (a) a line and (b) a color plot. In the color plot of Fig. 3(b) [which is plotted versus the detuning Ω rather than the wavelength], the dashed and solid lines correspond to the boundaries of the theoretical MI gain region defined by the two inequalities, Eqs. (1) and (2), respectively. We can see that theoretical and experimental results agree well, and that the generated sidebands lie within the expected bandwidth. We would like to point out the structure of the MI gain bands. When the pump is well within the anomalous dispersion regime (λEDFL > 1550 nm) we observe a single wide gain region extending on both sides of the pump. However, when the EDFL experiences normal dispersion, the gain structure changes significantly into two sidebands that are detached from the pump. This behavior results from the contribution of fourth-order dispersion [31

31. M. Marhic, K.-Y. Wong, and L. Kazovsky, “Wide-band tuning of the gain spectra of one-pump fiber optical parametric amplifiers,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 10, 1133–1141 (2004). [CrossRef]

] and it is essential that this contribution is included in Eqs. (1) and (2).

Fig. 3 (a), (b) Enlargement of Figs. 2(a) and (b) around the MI region respectively. In (b), the solid and dashed lines correspond to the boundaries of the MI gain band, i.e. solutions of Eqs. (1) and (2) respectively. The dotted vertical and horizontal lines indicate the ZDW.

We now examine the long wavelength side of the spectra shown in Fig. 2. Two Stokes peaks are observed above 1600 nm: one (S1) remains stationary at 1651.5 nm upon tuning of the EDFL, while the wavelength of the other (S2) varies. Figures 4(a) and 4(b) show details of the relevant part of the spectra both as line and color plots. In Fig. 4(b), we have also superimposed as a black line the idler wavelength calculated from the energy conservation condition of a degenerate FWM process involving the EDFL and the RFL respectively acting as pump and signal, ωS2 = 2ωEDFLωRFL. As it perfectly overlaps with the observed peak S2 for all EDFL wavelengths, we can safely assume that this is the likely origin of S2. It must be clear however that this process cannot be phase-matched for all EDFL wavelengths (it is only phase-matched when S2 matches S1). In the general case, we therefore interpret it as resulting from a combination of non-phase-matched parametric FWM and SRS, i.e., Raman-assisted FWM [23

23. T. Sylvestre, H. Maillotte, E. Lantz, and P. T. Dinda, “Raman-assisted parametric frequency conversion in a normally dispersive single-mode fiber,” Opt. Lett. 24, 1561–1563 (1999). [CrossRef]

]. The SRS gain from the EDFL pump overcomes the strict limitations imposed by the phase-matching condition and we observe the generated Stokes wave even with a relatively large phase-mismatch.

Fig. 4 Enlargement of Fig. 2 around the two Stokes waves, S1 (fixed) and S2 (variable). (a) Line plot, (b) color plot. In (b), the theoretical wavelength of S2 calculated from energy conservation considerations (2ωEDFL = ωRFL + ωS2) is superimposed as a black line.

As regards the fixed peak S1, as it does not vary with the EDFL wavelength, it is clear that the EDFL is not involved in its generation. Presuming a would-be degenerate FWM process involving S1 and the RFL laser yields a pump wavelength at ωp = (ωS1 + ωRFL)/2 = 1547.0 nm. This wavelength generally lies within the low spectral power ASE pedestal generated by the EDFA. A phase-matching analysis using the fiber parameters given above yields a phase-matched wavelength of 1651 nm very close to the experimentally observed position of S1 at 1651.5 nm (the discrepancy is probably due to uncertainties in the dispersion values). S1 thus results from phase-matched narrow-band degenerate FWM with an incoherent pump seeded by the RFL laser, i.e., induced MI. Note we have also considered the possibility of a non-degenerate FWM process with the RFL and a ASE slice acting as pump waves coupled with a lower order emission line of the RFL around 1.3 μm acting as a seed. However this process is associated with a very large phase-mismatch and thus is highly unlikely. The simultaneous generation of the two waves S1 and S2 is rather remarkable. It demonstrates the co-existence of a phase-matched and a non-phase-matched FWM process sharing the same RFL seed and mixed coherent-incoherent pump. The two waves only merge when the EDFL wavelength matches with the 1547.0 nm ASE slice involved in the generation of S1, as seen in the center of Fig. 4. It should be noted that the phase-matched process generating wave S1 seems less effective than the process generating S2. This can be attributed to the relatively low spectral power of the ASE slice at 1547.0 nm [PEDFLPASE(λ = 1547.0 nm) > 20 dB]. Furthermore the two gaps with no power in S1 seen in figure 4 are due to the spectral power of the ASE slice at 1547.0 nm dropping further when the EDFL wavlength is close [PEDFLPASE(λ = 1547.0 nm) > 40 dB]. In this case the spectral power in the ASE slice is not sufficient for significant conversion of light to wave S1.

We have investigated further the mechanism leading to the generation of S1 by conducting an additional experiment in which the EDFL was switched off. In this way, we studied the FWM interactions between the RFL and the ASE noise of the EDFA without the influence of the coherent EDFL signal. Figure 5(a) depicts output spectra for two different ASE power levels. Notice the efficiency with which the 1651.5 nm Stokes wave is generated. For the highest ASE power we considered (33 dBm), the power of the generated Stokes is significantly higher than the residual power of the RFL, the latter one appearing severely depleted. The level of depletion of the RFL at the fiber end actually increases with increasing ASE input power. This behavior is partly due to SRS which induces an asymmetry between the Stokes and anti-Stokes sides of the ASE pump by causing a net-energy transfer from lower to higher wavelengths [23

23. T. Sylvestre, H. Maillotte, E. Lantz, and P. T. Dinda, “Raman-assisted parametric frequency conversion in a normally dispersive single-mode fiber,” Opt. Lett. 24, 1561–1563 (1999). [CrossRef]

]. In terms of efficiency, we must stress that we have also performed an experiment with a constant ASE power of 30 dBm while varying the power of the RFL. The Stokes wave was still generated quite efficiently (−20 dB with respect to the RFL output) with only 50 mW from the RFL.

Fig. 5 (a) Output spectra demonstrating FWM between the RFL and the ASE pump for a constant RFL power of 1 W and ASE powers of 28 dBm (solid) and 33 dBm (dotted). (b) Output spectra for constant ASE pump power of 30 dBm and RFL power of 100 mW (solid) and 900 mW (dotted).

3. Conclusion

In conclusion we have demonstrated that multiple independent FWM processes can co-exist inside optical fibers. In particular, we have revealed a competition between phase-matched FWM with an incoherent pump and non-phase-matched FWM with a coherent pump. Additionally, we examined induced MI with an incoherent pump which surprisingly leads to a quite high conversion efficiency. Clearly, FWM with incoherent pumps leads to surprising new features and deserves more investigation.

Acknowledgments

Thibaut Sylvestre thanks the programme de coopération territoriale européen france-suisse INTERREG IV and the Conseil Régional de Franche-Comté for financial support. The work of Stéphane Coen is supported by a New Economy Research Fund (NERF) grant from The Foundation for Research, Science and Technology of the New Zealand government.

References and links

1.

R. H. Stolen, J. E. Bjorkholm, and A. Ashkin, “Phase-matched three-wave mixing in silica fiber optical waveguides,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 24, 308–310 (1974). [CrossRef]

2.

A. C. Sodre, J. M. C. Boggio, A. A. Rieznik, H. E. Hernandez-Figueroa, H. L. Fragnito, and J. C. Knight, “Highly efficient generation of broadband cascaded four-wave mixing products,” Opt. Express 16, 2816–2828 (2008). [CrossRef]

3.

D. L. Hart, A. F. Judy, R. Roy, and J. W. Beletic, “Dynamical evolution of multiple four-wave-mixing processes in an optical fiber,” Phys. Rev. E 57, 4757–4774 (1998). [CrossRef]

4.

G. Millot, “Multiple four-wave mixing-induced modulational instability in highly birefringent fibers,” Opt. Lett. 26, 1391–1393 (2001). [CrossRef]

5.

G. Cappellini and S. Trillo, “Third-order three-wave mixing in single-mode fibers: exact solutions and spatial instability effects,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 824–838 (1991). [CrossRef]

6.

A. S. Y. Hsieh, G. K. L. Wong, S. G. Murdoch, S. Coen, F. Vanholsbeeck, R. Leonhardt, and J. D. Harvey, “Combined effect of Raman and parametric gain on single-pump parametric amplifiers,” Opt. Express 15, 8104–8114 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

S. Coen, D. A. Wardle, and J. D. Harvey, “Observation of non-phase-matched parametric amplification in resonant nonlinear optics,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 273901 (2002). [CrossRef]

8.

Y. Chen and A. W. Snyder, “Four-photon parametric mixing in optical fibers: effect of pump depletion,” Opt. Lett. 14, 87–89 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

9.

R. Stolen and J. Bjorkholm, “Parametric amplification and frequency conversion in optical fibers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 18, 1062–1072 (1982). [CrossRef]

10.

J. Hansryd, P. Andrekson, M. Westlund, J. Li, and P.-O. Hedekvist, “Fiber-based optical parametric amplifiers and their applications,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 8, 506–520 (2002). [CrossRef]

11.

M. Islam and O. Boyraz, “Fiber parametric amplifiers for wavelength band conversion,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 8, 527–537 (2002). [CrossRef]

12.

M. E. Marhic, Y. Park, F. S. Yang, and L. G. Kazovsky, “Broadband fiber-optical parametric amplifiers and wavelength converters with low-ripple Chebyshev gain spectra,” Opt. Lett. 21, 1354 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

S. Coen and M. Haelterman, “Continuous-wave ultrahigh-repetition-rate pulse-train generation through modulational instability in a passive fiber cavity,” Opt. Lett. 26, 39–41 (2001). [CrossRef]

14.

J. Fatome, S. Pitois, and G. Millot, “20-GHz-to-1-THz repetition rate pulse sources based on multiple four-wave mixing in optical fibers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 42, 1038–1046 (2006). [CrossRef]

15.

J. Schröder, S. Coen, F. Vanholsbeeck, and T. Sylvestre, “Passively mode-locked Raman fiber laser with 100 GHz repetition rate,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3489–3491 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

16.

R. K. Jain and K. Stenersen, “Phase-matched four-photon mixing processes in birefringent fibers,” Appl. Phys. B 35, 49–57 (1984). [CrossRef]

17.

J. R. Thompson and R. Roy, “Multiple four-wave mixing process in an optical fiber,” Opt. Lett. 16, 557–559 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

18.

J. R. Thompson and R. Roy, “Nonlinear dynamics of multiple four-wave mixing processes in a single-mode fiber,” Phys. Rev. A 43, 4987–4996 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

19.

S. Trillo, S. Wabnitz, and T. A. B. Kennedy, “Nonlinear dynamics of dual-frequency-pumped multiwave mixing in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 50, 1732–1747 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

20.

X. Liu, X. Zhou, and C. Lu, “Multiple four-wave mixing self-stability in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 72, 013811 (2005). [CrossRef]

21.

C. J. McKinstrie and M. G. Raymer, “Four-wave-mixing cascades near the zero-dispersion frequency,” Opt. Express 14, 9600–9610 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

22.

E. Lantz, D. Gindre, H. Maillotte, and J. Monneret, “Phase matching for parametric amplification in a single-mode birefringent fiber: influence of the non-phase-matched waves,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 14, 116–125 (1997). [CrossRef]

23.

T. Sylvestre, H. Maillotte, E. Lantz, and P. T. Dinda, “Raman-assisted parametric frequency conversion in a normally dispersive single-mode fiber,” Opt. Lett. 24, 1561–1563 (1999). [CrossRef]

24.

Y. S. Jang and Y. C. Chung, “Four-wave mixing of incoherent light in a dispersion-shifted fiber using a spectrum-sliced fiber amplifier light source,” IEEE Photon. Technol. Lett. 10, 218–220 (1998). [CrossRef]

25.

A. Sauter, S. Pitois, G. Millot, and A. Picozzi, “Incoherent modulation instability in instantaneous nonlinear Kerr media,” Opt. Lett. 30, 2143–2145 (2005). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

26.

S. Gao, C. Yang, X. Xiao, Y. Tian, Z. You, and G. Jin, “Wavelength conversion of spectrum-sliced broadband amplified spontaneous emission light by hybrid four-wave mixing in highly nonlinear, dispersion-shifted fibers,” Opt. Express 14, 2873–2879 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

27.

J. M. Chávez Boggio and H. L. Fragnito, “Simple four-wave-mixing-based method for measuring the ratio between the third- and fourth-order dispersion in optical fibers,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 24, 2046–2054 (2007). [CrossRef]

28.

Y. Q. Xu and S. G. Murdoch, “Gain spectrum of an optical parametric amplifier with a temporally incoherent pump,” Opt. Lett , 35, 169–171 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

29.

Y. Q. Xu and S. G. Murdoch, “Gain statistics of a fiber optical parametric amplifier with a temporally incoherent pump,” Opt. Lett. , 35, 826–829 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

30.

J. D. Harvey, R. Leonhardt, S. Coen, G. K. L. Wong, J. C. Knight, W. J. Wadsworth, and P. St. J. Russell, “Scalar modulation instability in the normal dispersion regime by use of a photonic crystal fiber,” Opt. Lett. 28, 2225–2227 (2003). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

31.

M. Marhic, K.-Y. Wong, and L. Kazovsky, “Wide-band tuning of the gain spectra of one-pump fiber optical parametric amplifiers,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 10, 1133–1141 (2004). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(190.4370) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics, fibers
(190.4380) Nonlinear optics : Nonlinear optics, four-wave mixing

ToC Category:
Nonlinear Optics

History
Original Manuscript: September 20, 2010
Revised Manuscript: November 10, 2010
Manuscript Accepted: November 16, 2010
Published: November 24, 2010

Citation
Jochen Schroder, Anne Boucon, Stephane Coen, and Thibaut Sylvestre, "Interplay of four-wave mixing processes with a mixed coherent-incoherent pump," Opt. Express 18, 25833-25838 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-25-25833


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References

  1. R. H. Stolen, J. E. Bjorkholm, and A. Ashkin, “Phase-matched three-wave mixing in silica fiber optical waveguides,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 24, 308–310 (1974). [CrossRef]
  2. A. C. Sodre, J. M. C. Boggio, A. A. Rieznik, H. E. Hernandez-Figueroa, H. L. Fragnito, and J. C. Knight, “Highly efficient generation of broadband cascaded four-wave mixing products,” Opt. Express 16, 2816–2828 (2008). [CrossRef]
  3. D. L. Hart, A. F. Judy, R. Roy, and J. W. Beletic, “Dynamical evolution of multiple four-wave-mixing processes in an optical fiber,” Phys. Rev. E Stat. Phys. Plasmas Fluids Relat. Interdiscip. Topics 57, 4757–4774 (1998). [CrossRef]
  4. G. Millot, “Multiple four-wave mixing-induced modulational instability in highly birefringent fibers,” Opt. Lett. 26, 1391–1393 (2001). [CrossRef]
  5. G. Cappellini, and S. Trillo, “Third-order three-wave mixing in single-mode fibers: exact solutions and spatial instability effects,” J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 8, 824–838 (1991). [CrossRef]
  6. A. S. Y. Hsieh, G. K. L. Wong, S. G. Murdoch, S. Coen, F. Vanholsbeeck, R. Leonhardt, and J. D. Harvey, “Combined effect of Raman and parametric gain on single-pump parametric amplifiers,” Opt. Express 15, 8104–8114 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. S. Coen, D. A. Wardle, and J. D. Harvey, “Observation of non-phase-matched parametric amplification in resonant nonlinear optics,” Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 273901 (2002). [CrossRef]
  8. Y. Chen, and A. W. Snyder, “Four-photon parametric mixing in optical fibers: effect of pump depletion,” Opt. Lett. 14, 87–89 (1989). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  9. R. Stolen, and J. Bjorkholm, “Parametric amplification and frequency conversion in optical fibers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 18, 1062–1072 (1982). [CrossRef]
  10. J. Hansryd, P. Andrekson, M. Westlund, J. Li, and P.-O. Hedekvist, “Fiber-based optical parametric amplifiers and their applications,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 8, 506–520 (2002). [CrossRef]
  11. M. Islam, and O. Boyraz, “Fiber parametric amplifiers for wavelength band conversion,” IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 8, 527–537 (2002). [CrossRef]
  12. M. E. Marhic, Y. Park, F. S. Yang, and L. G. Kazovsky, “Broadband fiber-optical parametric amplifiers and wavelength converters with low-ripple Chebyshev gain spectra,” Opt. Lett. 21, 1354 (1996). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. S. Coen, and M. Haelterman, “Continuous-wave ultrahigh-repetition-rate pulse-train generation through modulational instability in a passive fiber cavity,” Opt. Lett. 26, 39–41 (2001). [CrossRef]
  14. J. Fatome, S. Pitois, and G. Millot, “20-GHz-to-1-THz repetition rate pulse sources based on multiple four-wave mixing in optical fibers,” IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 42, 1038–1046 (2006). [CrossRef]
  15. J. Schr¨oder, S. Coen, F. Vanholsbeeck, and T. Sylvestre, “Passively mode-locked Raman fiber laser with 100 GHz repetition rate,” Opt. Lett. 31, 3489–3491 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  16. R. K. Jain, and K. Stenersen, “Phase-matched four-photon mixing processes in birefringent fibers,” Appl. Phys. B 35, 49–57 (1984). [CrossRef]
  17. J. R. Thompson, and R. Roy, “Multiple four-wave mixing process in an optical fiber,” Opt. Lett. 16, 557–559 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  18. J. R. Thompson, and R. Roy, “Nonlinear dynamics of multiple four-wave mixing processes in a single-mode fiber,” Phys. Rev. A 43, 4987–4996 (1991). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  19. S. Trillo, S. Wabnitz, and T. A. B. Kennedy, “Nonlinear dynamics of dual-frequency-pumped multiwave mixing in optical fibers,” Phys. Rev. A 50, 1732–1747 (1994). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
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