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Optics Express

Optics Express

  • Editor: C. Martijn de Sterke
  • Vol. 18, Iss. 5 — Mar. 1, 2010
  • pp: 4557–4563
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Polarized infrared emission using frequency selective surfaces

James Ginn, David Shelton, Peter Krenz, Brian Lail, and Glenn Boreman  »View Author Affiliations


Optics Express, Vol. 18, Issue 5, pp. 4557-4563 (2010)
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.004557


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Abstract

An emission frequency selective surface, or eFSS, is made up of a periodic arrangement of resonant antenna structures above a ground plane. By exploiting the coupling and symmetry properties of an eFSS, it is possible to introduce polarization sensitive thermal emission and, subsequently, coherent emission. Two surfaces are considered: a linearly polarized emission surface and a circularly polarized emission surface. The linearly polarized surface consisted of an array of dipole elements and measurements demonstrate these surfaces can be fabricated into high polarization contrast patterns. The circularly polarized surface required the use of an asymmetrical tripole element to maintain coherence between orthogonal current modes and introduce the necessary phase delay to realize circularly polarized radiation.

© 2010 OSA

1. Introduction

In this paper, two frequency selective surfaces (FSS) [8

8. B. A. Munk, Frequency Selective Surfaces: Theory and Design, (Wiley, 2000).

] are analyzed for their potential as coherent-polarized-emission surfaces. Polarized emitting materials have been demonstrated previously in lasers and chiral materials [9

9. H. Ruthanne, E. Swaim, N. Hammer, E. Richards, D. Venkataraman, and M. Barnes, “Robust Circular Polarized Emission from Nanoscopic Single-Molecule Sources: Application to Solid State Devices,” in Organic Electronics — Materials, Devices and Applications, F. So, G.B. Blanchet, Y. Ohmori, eds. (Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 965E, Warrendale, PA, 2007), pp. 0965–S12–08.

]. The issue with all of these approaches is that they require non-planar structures or structures secondary to the emission surface (such as a linear polarizer) to achieve polarization. Planar infrared emission FSS (eFSS) are an excellent alternative to these surfaces and can be significantly easier to fabricate and tailor to meet specific emission needs. Similar surfaces have already been developed in the infrared for a variety of applications including spectral filtering [10

10. Y. Tang, J. A. Bossard, D. H. Werner, and T. S. Mayer, “Single-layer metallodielectric nanostructures as dual-band midinfrared filters,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(26), 263106 (2008). [CrossRef]

], negative refraction [11

11. V. M. Shalaev, W. Cai, U. K. Chettiar, H.-K. Yuan, A. K. Sarychev, V. P. Drachev, and A. V. Kildishev, “Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials,” Opt. Lett. 30(24), 3356–3358 (2005). [CrossRef]

], planar focusing [12

12. J. Ginn, B. Lail, J. Alda, and G. Boreman, “Planar infrared binary phase reflectarray,” Opt. Lett. 33(8), 779–781 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

], and selective absorption [13

13. I. Pusçasu, W. Schaich, and G. Boreman, “Resonant enhancement of emission and absorption using frequency selective surfaces in the infrared,” Infrared Phys. Technol. 43(2), 101–107 (2002). [CrossRef]

]. Specifically, an eFSS consists of an array of passive, resonant antenna elements fabricated above a ground plane. The array will emit when in physical contact with a thermal source and does not require localized excitation. The basic concepts of these surfaces are further outlined in [14

14. B. Monacelli, J. Pryor, B. Munk, D. Kotter, and G. Boreman, “Infrared frequency selective surface based on circuit-analog square loop design,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 53(2), 745–752 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. Because eFSS require a ground plane to function, these structures do not rely on transparent substrates like many emissive diffractive grating designs [15

15. J. Tharp, D. Shelton, S. Wadsworth, and G. Boreman, “Electron-Beam Lithography of Multiple Layer Sub-micrometer Periodic Arrays on a Barium Fluoride Substrate,” J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 26, 1821–1823 (2008). [CrossRef]

]. This allows for direct control of the spectral emissivity independent of the surface of the thermal source. Furthermore, these surfaces enjoy the possibility of dual band operation and robust design using well-established computational electromagnetic techniques.

2. eFSS polarization theory

One limitation to studying polarization sensitivity through simulation is that frequency-domain modeling inherently assumes a high degree of coherence in the excitation which is not present during thermal emission. Any phase values calculated by modeling for these surfaces are meaningless unless coherence is present between the randomly generated thermal current sources. Furthermore, if the eFSS element is symmetric about two or more planes and allows for orthogonal current modes to exist at resonance, then no field mechanisms are present to ensure temporal coherence between the two resonant modes, so emission from this array must be un-polarized. The lack of coherence between orthogonal current modes precludes the use of many reflective polarizer designs, such as elliptically polarized reflectarrays [17

17. Z. Wu, W. Zhang, Z. Liu, and W. Shen, “Circularly polarised reflectarray with linearly polarised feed,” Electron. Lett. 41(7), 387–388 (2005). [CrossRef]

]. Instead, the only way to achieve elliptically polarized emission is to utilize a resonant element with strong cross-polarization. In this case a single thermal current can excite emission in both orthogonal linear states. The self correlation of the thermal current is sufficient to achieve ellipitically polarized emission.

It is also important to recognize that if the elements making up the eFSS are not shorted to the ground plane, they will experience some degree of coupling to neighboring elements [18

18. R. Jedlicka, M. Poe, and K. Carver, “Measured mutual coupling between microstrip antennas,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 29(1), 147–149 (1981). [CrossRef]

]. This coupling will serve as a capacitive load and directly influences the resonance properties of the array. Given that the spectral reflection and emission performance of an FSS element are directly related, then the thermally excited currents in an emitting eFSS must also be influenced by this coupling. Thus, thermally generated currents excited on a single eFSS element will excite coherent currents on any coupled neighboring elements. Barring local defects or loss within the array that would significantly diminish coupling, spatially coherent emission should exist across a large portion of the entire structure. This distance can also be larger than what is achievable in some bulk materials where coupling is not present between all neighboring atoms.

3. Linearly polarized emission

A linearly polarized eFSS was initially developed using a dual band resonant element to verify that polarized emission using an eFSS is feasible. The simplest dual-band emitter element is the dipole microstrip patch. By ensuring the width of the dipole is small enough that it will not resonate in the same band as the dipole itself, the element will only emit linearly polarized light at its primary resonance. It should be noted that the dipole element is not the only eFSS geometry with dual-band behavior. More complicated designs could be developed depending on the spectral properties desired.

The ground plane and supporting structure for the proposed dipole structure consisted of a 380 µm thick silicon wafer with an 85 nm thick film of aluminum deposited directly on the wafer. A 1.2 µm film of Dow Corporations benzocyclobutene (BCB) was spun-on to isolate the elements from the ground plane and the eFSS elements were made of a lossy 100 nm film of titanium, to increase the bandwidth of the surface [19

19. J. Ginn, D. Shelton, P. Krenz, B. Lail, and G. Boreman, “Altering infrared metamaterial performance through metal resonance damping,” J. Appl. Phys. 105(7), 074304 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. The dipole antenna elements were 2.9 µm by 0.5 µm and the square unit cell spacing was 5 µm. A schematic and SEM image of the designed dipole array is shown in Fig. 1
Fig. 1 Schematic of a unit cell of the dipole array and a scanning electron micrograph of the fabricated array with array dimensions labeled. The width of the dipoles is 0.5 µm.
. Modeled emissivity data, from the commercially available modeling package Ansoft Designer, is presented in Fig. 2
Fig. 2 Modeled emission spectrum of the microstrip dipole. The dark line is the polarization state along the length of the dipole and the dotted line is the polarization state along the width of the dipole.
. The modeling approach used is identical to the one developed in [16

16. J. Ginn, B. Lail, D. Shelton, J. Tharp, W. Folks, and G. Boreman, “Characterizing Infrared Frequency Selective Surfaces on Dispersive Media,” Appl. Comput. Electromagn. Soc. J. 22, 184–188 (2007).

] except that the optical properties of the thin-films were fixed to their measured values at 28.3 THz. This approach is valid because of the wide spectral range of the measurement techniques employed minimizes the impact of spectral damping [19

19. J. Ginn, D. Shelton, P. Krenz, B. Lail, and G. Boreman, “Altering infrared metamaterial performance through metal resonance damping,” J. Appl. Phys. 105(7), 074304 (2009). [CrossRef]

]. Only the polarization of the measured emission is of interest, not the absolute magnitude of the emission. Future studies could utilize a spectral radiometer [14

14. B. Monacelli, J. Pryor, B. Munk, D. Kotter, and G. Boreman, “Infrared frequency selective surface based on circuit-analog square loop design,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 53(2), 745–752 (2005). [CrossRef]

] to measure the magnitude of the radiated emission.

For visual verification of the linear nature of the emission surface, a pattern using the University of Central Florida’s emblem, the Pegasus, was fabricated using orthogonally orientated dipoles. Fabrication of the linearly polarized eFSS was carried out using a standard electron-beam lithography process. The Pegasus was 27.5 mm in diameter. Images of this device produced using an 8-12 µm camera and a linear polarizer (Fig. 3
Fig. 3 Linearly polarized Pegasus (black regions correspond to vertically orientated dipoles and gray regions correspond to horizontally orientated dipoles). Thermal images of the linearly polarized Pegasus with the camera’s linear polarized (a) horizontally oriented and (b) vertically oriented.
) demonstrate the high contrast response of the dipole over a large bandwidth. When the array is imaged without a polarizer present in the optical train of the Pegasus both orthogonal dipoles emit equally and the emblem could not be resolved.

5. Multi-layer, circularly polarized emission

All of these limitations can be overcome by replacing the wire-grid polarizer with a linearly polarized emission surface (Fig. 4
Fig. 4 Compact, multi-layer circular polarizer for emitted radiation.
). The linearly polarized surface will allow for more emitted energy in the band of interest than the wire-grid. This is because the undesired polarization emission path is not supported by the surface and all emission from the heated surface must occur in the desired polarization state only. Control of spectral emissivity is readily available by altering the geometry and metal of the eFSS. The system is also significantly more compact than the wire-grid design with the substrate of the discrete design replaced with an electrically thin, thermal insulation layer. As long as the quarter-wave plate and the linearly polarized surface do not couple, they will behave identically to the meanderline structure measured in [4

4. J. S. Tharp, J. M. López-Alonso, J. C. Ginn, C. F. Middleton, B. A. Lail, B. A. Munk, and G. D. Boreman, “Demonstration of a single-layer meanderline phase retarder at infrared,” Opt. Lett. 31(18), 2687–2689 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

].

6. Single element circularly polarized emission

The asymmetric tripole, as shown in Fig. 5, was fabricated into a four-square checkerboard pattern with two squares having right-handed emission and the other two having left-handed emission. The piece was then mounted on a hot plate and imaged twice with a linear polarizer present. It was aligned once in the horizontal direction and once in the vertical direction. The arrays were seen to exhibit a degree of linearly polarized emission which is consistent with the model (Δε is not equal to zero over the entire 8 to 12 μm band). Next, a quarter-wave plate was introduced in front of the polarizer and the array was re-imaged in the two orthogonal circularly polarized states (Fig. 7
Fig. 7 Two thermal images (side by side) of checkerboard asymmetric tripole with circular polarizer in front of the camera and in two orthogonal directions.
). The images show that the arrays exhibit circularly polarized emission as only the quarter-wave plate was rotated when taking the pictures. A limitation in this measurement was that a meanderline polarizer [4

4. J. S. Tharp, J. M. López-Alonso, J. C. Ginn, C. F. Middleton, B. A. Lail, B. A. Munk, and G. D. Boreman, “Demonstration of a single-layer meanderline phase retarder at infrared,” Opt. Lett. 31(18), 2687–2689 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

] was used as the quarter-wave plate. While more broadband than a conventional crystal quarter-wave plate, the meanderline exhibits some chromatism and a preference towards one linear polarization state. Nevertheless, these initial results are promising and suggest the need for additional investigation and optimization.

7. Summary

Both linear and circularly polarized emission using a planar eFSS has been demonstrated for the first time. These surfaces are especially interesting due to their design flexibility and compactness when compared to similar grating based polarized emitters. The results also indicate a high degree of local coherence in emission which may be exploited to give rise to robust directional or focusing emission surfaces employing eFSS.

References and links

1.

B. Lee and Z. Zhang, “Coherent Thermal Emission From Modified Periodic Multilayer Structures,” J. Heat Transfer 129(1), 17–26 (2007). [CrossRef]

2.

J. J. Greffet, R. Carminati, K. Joulain, J. P. Mulet, S. Mainguy, and Y. Chen, “Coherent emission of light by thermal sources,” Nature 416(6876), 61–64 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

3.

E. Hasman, N. Dahan, A. Niv, G. Biener, and V. Kleiner, “Space-Variant Polarization Manipulation of a Thermal Emission by a SiO2 Subwavelength Grating Supporting Surface Phonon-Polariton,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CTuL6.

4.

J. S. Tharp, J. M. López-Alonso, J. C. Ginn, C. F. Middleton, B. A. Lail, B. A. Munk, and G. D. Boreman, “Demonstration of a single-layer meanderline phase retarder at infrared,” Opt. Lett. 31(18), 2687–2689 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

5.

L. Klein, H. Hamann, Y. Au, and S. Ingvarsson, “Coherence properties of infrared thermal emission from heated metallic nanowires,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(21), 213102 (2008). [CrossRef]

6.

S. Ingvarsson, L. Klein, Y. Y. Au, J. A. Lacey, and H. F. Hamann, “Enhanced thermal emission from individual antenna-like nanoheaters,” Opt. Express 15(18), 11249–11254 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

7.

C. M. Wang, Y. C. Chang, M. W. Tsai, Y. H. Ye, C. Y. Chen, Y. W. Jiang, Y. T. Chang, S. C. Lee, and D. P. Tsai, “Reflection and emission properties of an infrared emitter,” Opt. Express 15(22), 14673–14678 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

8.

B. A. Munk, Frequency Selective Surfaces: Theory and Design, (Wiley, 2000).

9.

H. Ruthanne, E. Swaim, N. Hammer, E. Richards, D. Venkataraman, and M. Barnes, “Robust Circular Polarized Emission from Nanoscopic Single-Molecule Sources: Application to Solid State Devices,” in Organic Electronics — Materials, Devices and Applications, F. So, G.B. Blanchet, Y. Ohmori, eds. (Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 965E, Warrendale, PA, 2007), pp. 0965–S12–08.

10.

Y. Tang, J. A. Bossard, D. H. Werner, and T. S. Mayer, “Single-layer metallodielectric nanostructures as dual-band midinfrared filters,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(26), 263106 (2008). [CrossRef]

11.

V. M. Shalaev, W. Cai, U. K. Chettiar, H.-K. Yuan, A. K. Sarychev, V. P. Drachev, and A. V. Kildishev, “Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials,” Opt. Lett. 30(24), 3356–3358 (2005). [CrossRef]

12.

J. Ginn, B. Lail, J. Alda, and G. Boreman, “Planar infrared binary phase reflectarray,” Opt. Lett. 33(8), 779–781 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]

13.

I. Pusçasu, W. Schaich, and G. Boreman, “Resonant enhancement of emission and absorption using frequency selective surfaces in the infrared,” Infrared Phys. Technol. 43(2), 101–107 (2002). [CrossRef]

14.

B. Monacelli, J. Pryor, B. Munk, D. Kotter, and G. Boreman, “Infrared frequency selective surface based on circuit-analog square loop design,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 53(2), 745–752 (2005). [CrossRef]

15.

J. Tharp, D. Shelton, S. Wadsworth, and G. Boreman, “Electron-Beam Lithography of Multiple Layer Sub-micrometer Periodic Arrays on a Barium Fluoride Substrate,” J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 26, 1821–1823 (2008). [CrossRef]

16.

J. Ginn, B. Lail, D. Shelton, J. Tharp, W. Folks, and G. Boreman, “Characterizing Infrared Frequency Selective Surfaces on Dispersive Media,” Appl. Comput. Electromagn. Soc. J. 22, 184–188 (2007).

17.

Z. Wu, W. Zhang, Z. Liu, and W. Shen, “Circularly polarised reflectarray with linearly polarised feed,” Electron. Lett. 41(7), 387–388 (2005). [CrossRef]

18.

R. Jedlicka, M. Poe, and K. Carver, “Measured mutual coupling between microstrip antennas,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 29(1), 147–149 (1981). [CrossRef]

19.

J. Ginn, D. Shelton, P. Krenz, B. Lail, and G. Boreman, “Altering infrared metamaterial performance through metal resonance damping,” J. Appl. Phys. 105(7), 074304 (2009). [CrossRef]

20.

J. Vardaxoglou and E. Parker, “Performance of two tripole arrays as frequency selective surfaces,” Electron. Lett. 19(18), 709–710 (1983). [CrossRef]

21.

D. Pozar, S. Targonski, and H. Syrigos, “Design of Millimeter Wave Microstrip Reflectarrays,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 45(2), 287–296 (1997). [CrossRef]

OCIS Codes
(230.5440) Optical devices : Polarization-selective devices
(160.3918) Materials : Metamaterials
(290.6815) Scattering : Thermal emission

ToC Category:
Optical Devices

History
Original Manuscript: November 5, 2009
Revised Manuscript: December 21, 2009
Manuscript Accepted: February 10, 2010
Published: February 19, 2010

Citation
James Ginn, David Shelton, Peter Krenz, Brian Lail, and Glenn Boreman, "Polarized infrared emission using frequency selective surfaces," Opt. Express 18, 4557-4563 (2010)
http://www.opticsinfobase.org/oe/abstract.cfm?URI=oe-18-5-4557


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References

  1. B. Lee and Z. Zhang, “Coherent Thermal Emission From Modified Periodic Multilayer Structures,” J. Heat Transfer 129(1), 17–26 (2007). [CrossRef]
  2. J. J. Greffet, R. Carminati, K. Joulain, J. P. Mulet, S. Mainguy, and Y. Chen, “Coherent emission of light by thermal sources,” Nature 416(6876), 61–64 (2002). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  3. E. Hasman, N. Dahan, A. Niv, G. Biener, and V. Kleiner, “Space-Variant Polarization Manipulation of a Thermal Emission by a SiO2 Subwavelength Grating Supporting Surface Phonon-Polariton,” in Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics, (Optical Society of America, 2005), paper CTuL6.
  4. J. S. Tharp, J. M. López-Alonso, J. C. Ginn, C. F. Middleton, B. A. Lail, B. A. Munk, and G. D. Boreman, “Demonstration of a single-layer meanderline phase retarder at infrared,” Opt. Lett. 31(18), 2687–2689 (2006). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  5. L. Klein, H. Hamann, Y. Au, and S. Ingvarsson, “Coherence properties of infrared thermal emission from heated metallic nanowires,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(21), 213102 (2008). [CrossRef]
  6. S. Ingvarsson, L. Klein, Y. Y. Au, J. A. Lacey, and H. F. Hamann, “Enhanced thermal emission from individual antenna-like nanoheaters,” Opt. Express 15(18), 11249–11254 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  7. C. M. Wang, Y. C. Chang, M. W. Tsai, Y. H. Ye, C. Y. Chen, Y. W. Jiang, Y. T. Chang, S. C. Lee, and D. P. Tsai, “Reflection and emission properties of an infrared emitter,” Opt. Express 15(22), 14673–14678 (2007). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  8. B. A. Munk, Frequency Selective Surfaces: Theory and Design, (Wiley, 2000).
  9. H. Ruthanne, E. Swaim, N. Hammer, E. Richards, D. Venkataraman, and M. Barnes, “Robust Circular Polarized Emission from Nanoscopic Single-Molecule Sources: Application to Solid State Devices,” in Organic Electronics — Materials, Devices and Applications, F. So, G.B. Blanchet, Y. Ohmori, eds. (Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 965E, Warrendale, PA, 2007), pp. 0965–S12–08.
  10. Y. Tang, J. A. Bossard, D. H. Werner, and T. S. Mayer, “Single-layer metallodielectric nanostructures as dual-band midinfrared filters,” Appl. Phys. Lett. 92(26), 263106 (2008). [CrossRef]
  11. V. M. Shalaev, W. Cai, U. K. Chettiar, H.-K. Yuan, A. K. Sarychev, V. P. Drachev, and A. V. Kildishev, “Negative index of refraction in optical metamaterials,” Opt. Lett. 30(24), 3356–3358 (2005). [CrossRef]
  12. J. Ginn, B. Lail, J. Alda, and G. Boreman, “Planar infrared binary phase reflectarray,” Opt. Lett. 33(8), 779–781 (2008). [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  13. I. Pusçasu, W. Schaich, and G. Boreman, “Resonant enhancement of emission and absorption using frequency selective surfaces in the infrared,” Infrared Phys. Technol. 43(2), 101–107 (2002). [CrossRef]
  14. B. Monacelli, J. Pryor, B. Munk, D. Kotter, and G. Boreman, “Infrared frequency selective surface based on circuit-analog square loop design,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 53(2), 745–752 (2005). [CrossRef]
  15. J. Tharp, D. Shelton, S. Wadsworth, and G. Boreman, “Electron-Beam Lithography of Multiple Layer Sub-micrometer Periodic Arrays on a Barium Fluoride Substrate,” J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 26, 1821–1823 (2008). [CrossRef]
  16. J. Ginn, B. Lail, D. Shelton, J. Tharp, W. Folks, and G. Boreman, “Characterizing Infrared Frequency Selective Surfaces on Dispersive Media,” Appl. Comput. Electromagn. Soc. J. 22, 184–188 (2007).
  17. Z. Wu, W. Zhang, Z. Liu, and W. Shen, “Circularly polarised reflectarray with linearly polarised feed,” Electron. Lett. 41(7), 387–388 (2005). [CrossRef]
  18. R. Jedlicka, M. Poe, and K. Carver, “Measured mutual coupling between microstrip antennas,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 29(1), 147–149 (1981). [CrossRef]
  19. J. Ginn, D. Shelton, P. Krenz, B. Lail, and G. Boreman, “Altering infrared metamaterial performance through metal resonance damping,” J. Appl. Phys. 105(7), 074304 (2009). [CrossRef]
  20. J. Vardaxoglou and E. Parker, “Performance of two tripole arrays as frequency selective surfaces,” Electron. Lett. 19(18), 709–710 (1983). [CrossRef]
  21. D. Pozar, S. Targonski, and H. Syrigos, “Design of Millimeter Wave Microstrip Reflectarrays,” IEEE Trans. Antenn. Propag. 45(2), 287–296 (1997). [CrossRef]

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